Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Introduction to Computer Crime - John Bambenek talk to Champaign Seniors Policy Academy
Introduction to Computer Crime - John Bambenek talk to Champaign Seniors Policy Academy
Introduction to Computer Crime - John Bambenek talk to Champaign Seniors Policy Academy
Introduction to Computer Crime - John Bambenek talk to Champaign Seniors Policy Academy
Introduction to Computer Crime - John Bambenek talk to Champaign Seniors Policy Academy
Introduction to Computer Crime - John Bambenek talk to Champaign Seniors Policy Academy
Introduction to Computer Crime - John Bambenek talk to Champaign Seniors Policy Academy
Introduction to Computer Crime - John Bambenek talk to Champaign Seniors Policy Academy
Introduction to Computer Crime - John Bambenek talk to Champaign Seniors Policy Academy
Introduction to Computer Crime - John Bambenek talk to Champaign Seniors Policy Academy
Introduction to Computer Crime - John Bambenek talk to Champaign Seniors Policy Academy
Introduction to Computer Crime - John Bambenek talk to Champaign Seniors Policy Academy
Introduction to Computer Crime - John Bambenek talk to Champaign Seniors Policy Academy
Introduction to Computer Crime - John Bambenek talk to Champaign Seniors Policy Academy
Introduction to Computer Crime - John Bambenek talk to Champaign Seniors Policy Academy
Introduction to Computer Crime - John Bambenek talk to Champaign Seniors Policy Academy
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Introduction to Computer Crime - John Bambenek talk to Champaign Seniors Policy Academy

504

Published on

This talk was an introduction to computer crime to the Champaign County Seniors' Police Academy given on May 30, 2013 at ILEAS.

This talk was an introduction to computer crime to the Champaign County Seniors' Police Academy given on May 30, 2013 at ILEAS.

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
504
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. John Bambenek Bambenek Consulting
  • 2.  14 years experience in computer security  Work as a digital forensic examiner, investigator and researcher  Usually do fraud cases but some other work too  Live here in Champaign with my family
  • 3.  Vandalism (Hacktivism)  Fraud (Various ways to steal money)  Espionage (Stealing information)  Sabotage (Destruction, disgruntled employee)  National Security threats
  • 4.  On the Internet, no one knows you’re a dog.  It is really hard to be sure you are talking to who you are thinking you are talking to on email.  It is easy to “pretend” to be someone else.
  • 5.  Impersonation for fraud: ◦ Common for Facebook / Twitter / Email ◦ “Help, I’m stuck in the UK, can you wire me some money?” ◦ “Someone is saying some real bad stuff about you, click this link XX?” ◦ “I’m from helpdesk, use this to reset your password” ◦ Videos (Go to actual news sites or YouTube instead)
  • 6.  How do you know the website you are at is really legitimate? ◦ Charity fraud  Link may “say” it is going to a legitimate site, but may not be  Google searches are not as reliable as you think
  • 7.  Don’t put confidential information in an email.  Verify information offline.  Use bookmarks to go to commonly used sites for shopping / banking  Look for odd misspellings, e-mail addresses from overseas (.eu, .ru, etc)
  • 8.  We need passwords for everything and it is impossible to remember them all.  Passwords are not terribly difficult to steal.  The more a password looks like a real word, the easier it is to crack.  People tend to use the same password for everything.
  • 9.  The longer a password is, the harder it is to break.  Try to use a “throwaway” password for unimportant sites (i.e. ChicagoBears1995)  For banking/financial sites, ask for two- factor authentication (send text message to your phone)
  • 10.  Your computer is the best resource a criminal can get. If they get that, they get everything, all passwords, your e-mails, etc.  People are constantly attacking.  The are vulnerabilities being found in the software you use every day.
  • 11.  Always keep your computer up-to-date with Microsoft Update  Update your applications too, many will pop up warnings telling you to update. (But be careful)  Use anti-virus software, it costs money but it’s worth it to prevent headaches later ◦ Examples: McAfee, Norton
  • 12.  Avoid clicking on pop-ups from websites.  Avoid clicking on links in e-mails (attackers love this one)  Downloading pirated movies are often infected  Children’s game sites are often infected (stick with known names, Disney, Nick, etc)
  • 13.  People tend to think of the Internet as anonymous (it’s not)  This can lead to people using it as a means to harassment (sometimes just for harassment’s sake)  Worst thing you can do is feed it by responding, use ignore/block liberally
  • 14.  2.4 million cards were stolen  Mostly people “cloned” the cards and started shopping  Nothing consumers could have done to prevent it
  • 15.  Check bank account statements and credit card statements frequently ◦ The sooner your report a problem, the more likely your bank will give you money back and get you a new card  Check credit reports for new items you don’t recognize  Report crime to ic3.gov and/or local law enforcement

×