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(MinneBar) Experience Curating: Filter, Organize, and Share Your Way to Insane Value and Kicking Butt (April 6, 2013)

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How does that awesome person on Twitter or Facebook keep linking to all those valuable resources every freakin’ day? ...

How does that awesome person on Twitter or Facebook keep linking to all those valuable resources every freakin’ day?

Why is one friend your single source for design and development and another buddy your go-to startup and hardware dude?

And what the heck drives certain people to rock their physical and digital landscape with intentional filtering, simple organizing, and the instant ability to share what’s relevant to you?

It’s called curating, and this isn’t your grandma’s version like arranging museum artifacts.

“Content curation” has become a buzzword and is used in everything from clever marketing strategies to next-gen websites solving the Google search results crap trap. But why limit your curating to online content? And more importantly, how can you cultivate a curator’s mindset to turn your weaknesses into superpowers?

This interactive session will get you curating like a pro and dazzling your friends, family, and business peers like a magician with a turbocharged wand.

Find out the secret of people who filter their experiences with intention – while seamlessly archiving, categorizing, and adding context for the best stuff – and make those experiences accessible and sharable for their future benefit and the use of others. Develop new skills and add all these things to your personal toolkit in less time than it takes to eat lunch:

1) What topics and experiences you could curate to become everyone’s best friend
2) How to capture any moment and make it insanely valuable for years to come
3) How to set up a curating system and the best practices in customizing one
4) The practical and emotional benefits pulsing through the world’s best curators
5) How providing context turns a “meh” interaction into an “oh yeah!” engagement
6) Who can help burst the filter and algorithm bubble you don’t even know you’re in
7) Why curating is beautiful self-expression…and builds sweet problem-solving skills
8) How you’re already curating and why poor technique might be holding back your potential

If it happened or will happen, you can curate it. Yes folks, this is the thing that helps you with all the other important things.

It’s not about what you consume. It’s about how you experience the world and the value you generate from it. So if it’s health, money, amazing relationships, and overcoming being overwhelmed you seek, curating is your Swiss Army Knife. It’s about time that something so unsexy unlocked benefits that are so…frickin’…sizzling.

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  • How many individual moments do you have each day? A thousand? Ten thousand? And how many of those tiny moments converge into something that you’d say is as an “experience?”
  • Well, I guess that depends on how you define a moment and an experience. Does each time you blink your eyes or move from one thought to the next count as a moment? Does lunch count as one experience, or does each piece of food or each bite you take constitute an experience of its own?
  • Regardless of how you quantify and define moments and experiences, we all have a freakin’ ton of them each day, each week, each month, and each year. But what do we do with these millions or billions of individual experiences? None of them have equal weight and some are much more relevant than others to us and everyone around us.
  • If you curate your existence, you know exactly what do – or not to do – with all these small and large experiences. According to an eyeball-bulging report by the Global Information Industry Center, you and I each consume over 100,000 words a day on average. That’s 12 hours’ worth of words every day– from TV, the Internet, the radio, ads, books, and more – that have the potential to transform us…or deprive us. What are we going to do with those 12 hours’ worth of words every day? Something amazing…or nothing useful. This is what’s at stake.
  • Transforming our past experiences into something insanely valuable in the future is not all sunshine, lollipops, and rainbows.Quick show of hands. Who here has tried to stand in front of the fire hose of the Internet, tell your electronic device, “Let ‘er rip!” and then do something useful with the deluge of data and information? Go ahead, raise your hand.
  • And who here is overwhelmed with “stuff” – physical, digital, emotional stuff – the kind that prevents you from experiencing happiness, or serenity, confidence, and the efficient use of your time? Raise your hand again.
  • You know… There are a lot of challenges that we face on a daily basis. Some of them we enter into willingly and some of them we can’t avoid. Many of them relate to the primal fear that what we’re doing, why we exist, doesn’t matter.
  • One of my favorite quotes is from a man namedHenry Adams when he said, “Chaos was the law of nature; Order was the dream of man.”We exist in an inherently crazy, chaotic world. And it’s only through the systems that we use – flexible and long-lasting systems – that we can generate and maintain that order. Curating can be one of those systems. It brings order to chaos. And it does it in stirring, unpredictable, and most likely unsexy ways. But the results of a great curating system are really frickin’ sizzling. Curating all your experiences - or Experience Curating as I like to call it - is the thing that helps you with all the other important things.Your experiences are not something that happened to you. They are the things that make something happen for you.You’ll see why shortly. But for a moment, I’m gonna get a little personal.
  • Would you like to know a not-so-dirty secret about me? As soon as I was old enough to remember a name or a birthday, I was ready to forget a name or a birthday. The day my mom first trusted me to keep track of my winter gloves was the day I started losing those gloves. I had and still have a leaky brain and I used to be OK with it.
  • Fast forward a number of years and now I’m an intentionalcurator. Every important experience I’ve had in the past couple of years since I started curating seriously – from the great meal I ate at the restaurant El Norteño in the Longfellow neighborhood of Minneapolis on October 16, 2010 with my wife Melinda to the crazy infographic called “Sitting is Killing You” I saw on March 14th, 2012 on Medical Billing and Coding.org – these experiences are all filtered, organized, accessible, and sharable in a series of spreadsheets I created to be my external memory.
  • Let’s talk a little about what curating is and isn’t, at least in my view.Curating isn’t:Sorting your books in alphabetical order is not curating.A text file or notebook with random jottings about what you ate, read, saw, or smelledUnstructured bookmarks or spreadsheets… Post It Notes scattered all over the office… Scrapbooking without rhyme or reasonSo what the heck is this experience curating thing? Well, I define it as:
  • Step 1: Filter all your experiences and what you consume with intentionThe act of filtering all your experiences and what you consume with intention
  • Step 2: Archive, categorize, and provide context for the experiences you consider the best of the bestArchiving, categorizing, and providing context for the best stuff
  • Step 3: Make those experiences accessible and sharable for your future benefit and the use of othersAnd making those experiences accessible and sharable for your future benefit and the use of others. I’ll cover each of these steps and their components in more details in a little bit.
  • Main example:Going to the library: Libraries don’t give you access to every book and video ever created. That would be a waste of their time and yours. They have a system: The library system filters through the crap, picks out the best of the best creations, and archives and presents it in a way that’s useful to you. When you try 100 recipes, determine that 2 of them blow everyone’s mind, and then modify that recipe – also known as adding and preserving context – so that you can share it with whomever requests it or you need to pass it along to… that’s experience curating.Reading travel guides – which are already curated – and taking the most relevant stuff to archive and prep for a trip… that’s experience curating.Using PinterestUsing Evernote or SpringpadInstapaper, Storify, FlipboardReading The Huffington PostDoing an exercise from Nerd FitnessUsing websites like Goodreads, Etsy, Scoop.it, BundlrGetting the Next Draft or Brain Pickings newsletters
  • What’s curating and what’s not curating is subjective… so don’t take my word for it.Robin Good: ...the ultimate quality of the curator is like the one for a DJ. I mean, what's the difference between putting on a mix tape or having a live DJ?
  • Ask the audience: I’m going to turn it over to you now. What do you curate? what does curating look like to you?
  • I already read that book but forgot where and what the key information was. I don't want to have to read it all over again.I want to email my friend that awesome article in that one place I saw that one time. But where…and when?
  • Curating solved so many problems for me. It made the puzzle of my memory and of life much easier to deal with. I’d say it was even the catalyst for turning a weakness – my memory – into a superpower of an external memories within spreadsheets.(Don’t actually comment on the quote): “Each piece of life is like a puzzle, can you solve ‘em. Stress’ll drive you crazy when you’re dealing with these problems. Problems, problems, how you gonna solve ‘em. Man, I’m going crazy trying to deal with these problems.” - Rappin' 4-Tay
  • Everyone wants to feel important. Everyone wants to feel like what they do and did matters. You can take everything that you’ve done and expect to do and make sure that it matters by curating. It can validate your existence. Not just to you, but to everyone around you. People hate feeling like what they’re doing is irrelevant and not useful. Curating allows you to be useful – oftentimes insanely so – it allows other people to give you what you need. Love, trust, respect, and admiration for you and with you for what your curating mindset and system gives to them. They don’t even have to do any work. You do it all for them. You help fulfill their emotional needs by being a curator.
  • I have a friend who described curating as a journey about how you express yourself. I love that thinking. Curation can also be this amazing opportunity to express who you are and why it is you’ve come to be this way.
  • Information and “stuff” overwhelmExperience curating can be the lens through which past and future experiences are assessed to determine if they were worth it or will be worth it. If you couldn’t or didn’t curate anything from a past experience, or don’t expect to be able to curate anything from an optional future experience, why risk being overwhelmed with stuff and commitments?Example: Reading the same blog religiously for two years that publishes twice a week. That’s 200 blog posts and if you’re not curating anything from them – assuming it’s not your brother or mom that’s publishing them – it might be a sign you need to stop following that blog and reduce your risk of being overwhelmed with all the other stuff you follow.Choose not to experience the future moments that aren’t ripe for curating and you’ll be on a path to avoiding or defeating the feeling of being overwhelmed.
  • Want to write a blog post about the top ten places that you’ve eaten in the past 5 years? Go to your spreadsheet or your curating system. Crank it out. It’s as simple as that when you keep track and add context to your experiences.
  • Maybe you’re a freelancer who needs a stash of inspirational material or proven resources for new projects that are thrown your way. Again, dip into your curated experiences and easily pull out the relevant ones for the job.
  • From the Lifestyle Information Survey 2011, "I Consider Myself A Curator of Content" Section:“I consider the content I share part of who I am" (61.3%)“My friends on Facebook count on me to share interesting things” (58.4%)Conclusion: People are engaged in Social Curation and see content publishing, linking, and re‐tweeting as a key part of their emerging Digital Identity
  • What do you see as the benefits of curating?
  • Takes too much timeWill cost me moneyI have a great memory so what’s the point? "No man has a good enough memory to make a successful liar." Abraham LincolnBenefits aren’t worth it
  • Too much time
  • Spending money
  • Every time you remember an event from the past, your brain networks change in ways that can alter the later recall of the event. Thus, the next time you remember it, you might recall not the original event but what you remembered the previous time. The Northwestern study is the first to show this. “A memory is not simply an image produced by time traveling back to the original event -- it can be an image that is somewhat distorted because of the prior times you remembered it,” said Donna Bridge, a postdoctoral fellow at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and lead author of the paper on the study recently published in the Journal of Neuroscience. “Your memory of an event can grow less precise even to the point of being totally false with each retrieval.” “Memories aren’t static,” she noted. “If you remember something in the context of a new environment and time, or if you are even in a different mood, your memories might integrate the new information.”
  • The benefits aren’t worth it“Hey, the benefits just don’t seem worth it.”It’s about at that point when I pose a question to them. I say, “Would you like to be the go-to resource for everything related to your industry? To your local community? Isn’t it worth something to you to be known as a thought leader for design, development, bootstrapping your business, hardware and software? Because all these things are within reach just by curating. Do you like it when people swing the door wide open for you because they see just how amazing and relevant the stuff you share on Facebook and Twitter is? Then curate. It’s worth it. I haven’t met anyone who started curating with intention and later told me, “Joel. You were wrong. It’s not worth it.”
  • Too complexTakes too much timeWill cost me moneyI have a great memory so what’s the point? "No man has a good enough memory to make a successful liar." Abraham LincolnBenefits aren’t worth itWhy are you doing all this curation when you don't know how and when it will be useful to you, me or anyone else in the future?You’ve tried it before and failed to create a worthwhile system: You tried and you failed. The moral of the story is...never try. - Homer Simpson. If you tried to curate before and failed, ignore Homer...just this one time
  • Ask the audience what their obstacles are to curating or doing it with an intentional system.
  • “As to methods there may be a million and then some, but principles are few. The man who grasps principles can successfully select his own methods. The man who tries methods, ignoring principles, is sure to have trouble.” - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • Physical Options:Your own Dewey Decimal SystemAnything you can think of, as long as it adheres to some or all of the curating best practices I’ll talk about in a moment
  • The detailed steps of curating
  • Filtering:The art of being intentional. It can be objective or subjective. Mine’s subjective, it’s just a feeling I have. But other people create formulas or more scientific methods of evaluating whether something should be curated. Each system and each person is inherently personal and subjective (and that’s not a bad thing). Your critical thinking is different than everyone else which provides the human element of curating (and it's why artificial intelligence and algorithms can't curate...they can only aggregate)
  • Archiving:Garbage in, garbage out
  • Categorize:Categories. An example is simplicity and minimalism. However, this could be the primary thing you sort and filter on, so this is insanely important.Talk about sub-categories and tags too.
  • Adding and Preserving Context:You always have to put things into the context of the person who’s going to be benefiting from your curating system. That could be you…or you could design your system to benefit someone or some group of people besides yourself. Start with the people who will be helped by this in mind and design your system always keeping them in mind.Scarecrow Fox by David Wilcoxson: Sculpture In Context 2012 at the National Botanic GardensSculpture In Context 2012 at the National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin, Dublin 9.
  • Accessing:
  • Sharing / Distribution:
  • Personal evolution as a curator:Sports cardsAdopting the “put it in a spreadsheet mantra”Puttytribe huddle and creating the Curious Curators group: Collaboration. Don’t just consume, collaborate and be part of the curating ecosystem.Following awesome curatorsWhat you can curate:The 40 hours spent watching all the episodes of The Wire if you think that’s important to you, will be important to you, or could be important for other people who want to watch the show and have the “friend’s notes” version (kinda like the director’s notes that are voice over overlaid in some DVDs)
  • Now it’s time for you to make a decision:Will you leave behind the belief that you can’t curate or that you shouldn’t curate? Do you want constant validation that what you’re doing matters – why you exist matters? This validation can be amplified 100 times over with clever curation. Prove that your experiences have meaning, but you can only prove it with action.Final slide in call to action section is Raam Dev quote:Ideas give action hope. Vision gives action direction. Intention gives action focus. Inspiration gives action strength. Thoughts give action structure. Experience gives action validation. All contribute to the instigation of action, but they are not action. - Raam Dev
  • Doers: Create or improve upon your own curating system and really dig deep into the reasons why it can be so valuable to youSupplier: Share this message – or this presentation itself – So you can show the world just how awesome you are through curatingInfluencer: Talk to your family, friends, co-workers, neighbors, and even strangers about how you curate and why it’s so importantInnovator: And if you’re feeling charged and inspired, invent your own curating platform or create your own presentation about curating with your unique spin on itCurating can save you time by instantly being able to access your best experiences. There are thousands of curators online now making money from their influence and systems that they sell to other people. You could be one of them. When you also rely on other people to curate for you, you can tap the power of other curators to eat better, work out smarter, and live healthier. And yes, curating can even make you more and better friends. Who doesn’t want to be friends with somebody that has superpowers, right?!
  • Remind people about their 100,000 words a day and ask how they’re going to convert them into something useful.Are you going to passively let them wash over you and resist their transformative power? Or are you going to actively curate them and unleash the dormant energy inside you to filter, organize, and share your way to some of your biggest goals?Imagine a world of intentional curators. Imagine this community, determined to leverage the past for enormous future gain. How amazing would this be?! I’ve already seen the promise, and I can’t tell you how excited I am because of it.This curator’s mindset - and landscape - isn’t just possible, but it’s inevitable with your help.
  • Last slide:If we don’t curate, then the exploding amount of data, words, information, and experiences that we have… will overwhelm us. We can do better.Because the currency of the curator is not content. It’s not information. It's the richness of experiences and how that transfers to other people.This is the thing that helps you with all the other important things.Your experiences are not something that happened to you. They are the things that make something happen for you.Curate your existence through experience curating, because nobody else can and will do it as awesomely as you.

(MinneBar) Experience Curating: Filter, Organize, and Share Your Way to Insane Value and Kicking Butt (April 6, 2013) (MinneBar) Experience Curating: Filter, Organize, and Share Your Way to Insane Value and Kicking Butt (April 6, 2013) Presentation Transcript

  • Experience Curating: Filter, Organize, andShare Your Way to Insane Value and Kicking Butt Joel Zaslofsky Founder: ValueOfSimple.com Twitter: @joelzaslofsky Slideshare: valueofsimple.com/MinneBar2013 Hashtag: #ExperienceCurating and #MinneBar
  • We’re all overwhelmed with some kind of “stuff”
  • “Chaos was the law of nature; Order was the dream of man.” - Henry B Adams
  • (That’s young Joelbeing OK with a leaky brain)
  • Yes, This is Curating
  • (This is not curating)
  • Experience Curating step #1: Filter your experiences with intention
  • Experience Curating step #2: Archive, categorize, and provide context for the best experiences
  • Experience Curating step #3: Access and share your experiences
  • What Does Curating Look Like?
  • “The ultimate quality of the curator is like the one for a DJ.” – Robin Good
  • This Guy Curates. What Do You Curate?
  • What’s the key information and where I can find it?
  • Can curating be a form of self-expression?
  • Overwhelmed OverwhelmedOverwhelmed OverwhelmedOverwhelmed Overwhelmed
  • Magnify.net Lifestyle Information Survey“I consider the content I share part of who I am" (61.3%)“My friends on Facebook count on me to share interesting things” (58.4%)Conclusion: People are engaged in social curation andsee content publishing, linking, and re‐tweeting as a key part of their digital identity
  • What Are the Benefits to YOU?
  • Pop Quiz: You Don’t Want to or Could Never Curate Because…A. It takes too much timeB. It requires spending money to do it rightC. You have a great memoryD. The benefits don’t seem worth it
  • Now that would take too much time
  • It’s gotta cost me money. Right?
  • So…to Recap:A. It takes too much timeB. It requires spending money to do it rightC. You have a great memoryD. The benefits don’t seem worth it
  • What Are Your Obstacles?
  • “The man who grasps principles can successfully select his own methods. The man who tries methods, ignoring principles, is sure to have trouble.” - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • There are physical options… with major drawbacks
  • The steps of Experience Curating
  • Filtering and the art of being intentional
  • Archiving: Garbage in, garbage out
  • Oh… categorizing.
  • What’s the Context?
  • Accessing
  • Sharing is only caring when done right
  • Curating tion Evolu
  • Ideas, intention, and inspiration ≠ Action
  • Your weaknesses could be superpowers
  • What Are You Going to Do With Your 100,000 Words?
  • Curate Your Existence
  • Experience Curating: Filter, Organize, andShare Your Way to Insane Value and Kicking Butt Joel Zaslofsky Founder: ValueOfSimple.com Twitter: @joelzaslofsky Slideshare: valueofsimple.com/MinneBar2013 Hashtag: #ExperienceCurating and #MinneBar