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Spreading the Word: Influencing Opinion Leaders Globally
 

Spreading the Word: Influencing Opinion Leaders Globally

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Research conducted by BBC and the Future Foundation into opinion leaders, word of mouth and how it works globally. The research covered 9,000 Opinion Leaders across 9 countries and goes beyond ...

Research conducted by BBC and the Future Foundation into opinion leaders, word of mouth and how it works globally. The research covered 9,000 Opinion Leaders across 9 countries and goes beyond previous Word of Mouth research by its global scope and identification of 3 types of Opinion Leader.
The study looks at how Opinion Leaders spread the word in response to brand activity, news and personal experience. It covers all types of Word of Mouth and all types of channel (online and offline) and by studying the make-up of Opinion Leaders in different countries it explores geographical differences in how Word of Mouth works.

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    Spreading the Word: Influencing Opinion Leaders Globally Spreading the Word: Influencing Opinion Leaders Globally Presentation Transcript

    • SPREADING THE WORDWHO DOES IT?WHAT DRIVES THEM?HOW CAN YOU MARKET TO THEM?
    • MEET THE MESSENGERSHOW DO YOU FIND THE PEOPLESPREADING THE WORD? Anyone can pass on information But there are some people who do so on a regular basis forming an identifiable channel for spreading the word They express themselves through adding opinion to the information they spread And research shows that they recognise and value their role as Messengers We call these people Opinion Leaders:  Some have large networks, some small  Some networks are homogenous, others diverse  Some are specialists, others discuss a vast range of subjects  They do so for different reasons - and in different ways
    • IDENTIFYING OUROPINION LEADERSTHEIR RECOGNITION OF THEIR ROLE ISTHE KEY TO DEFINING THEM RESEARCH FROM FUTURE FOUNDATION SHOWS THAT OPINION LEADERS ROUTINELY AGREE WITH AT LEAST 3 OF THESE 5 STATEMENTS: 1. I’m always on the lookout for new ideas 2. People often come to me for advice in general 3. I pass on recommendations of products/services 4. I forward on links to ads 5. I’m always telling people about new products/services
    • GETTING THE FULL PICTURETHIS IS THE FIRST GLOBAL STUDY OFTHOSE SPREADING WORD OF MOUTH 9,000 Opinion Leaders, 9 countries Goes beyond previous Word of Mouth research (Keller Fay, Guardian) by global scope and definition of 3 types of Opinion Leader Part of the BBC’s ongoing programme of Word of Mouth research Looks at how Opinion Leaders spread the word in response to brand activity, news and personal experience Covers all types of Word of Mouth and all types of channel (online and offline) By studying the make-up of Opinion Leaders in different countries we can explore geographical differences in how Word of Mouth works
    • TODAYS OPINION LEADERSTHREE DISTINCT TYPESUSING DIFFERENT CHANNELS, ACROSS DIFFERENT TYPES OFNETWORK, FOR DIFFERENT REASONSHUB URBANITES I EMAIL EVANGELISTS I OFFLINE INFLUENCERS
    • HUB URBANITES 20% OF OPINION LEADERS HOW DO THEY SHARE?  Social media and Instant Messenger HOW DO THEY HEAR? 63% TRUST THEM  TV and radio plus social media 100 (social networks, wikis, forums) WHY DO THEY MATTER? PEOPLE IN NETWORK  Highly trusted, connected and influential  Talk about more subjects than any other group  Often the first Opinion Leaders to start discussing a story 69% PASS ON INFO AT LEAST DAILY WHY DO THEY DO IT?  For enjoyment  To increase their profile  To spark a reaction / recognition  To advocate for what they believe in
    • EMAIL EVANGELISTS 20% OF OPINION LEADERS HOW DO THEY SHARE?  Email and SMS HOW DO THEY HEAR?  The web (major international news sites, forums, RSS) 47% TRUST THEM WHY DO THEY MATTER?  They have large and diverse networks 82 PEOPLE IN NETWORK  They reach the people hub urbanites can’t - or won’t  They talk less often but to a broader range of people 48% PASS ON INFO AT LEAST DAILY WHY DO THEY DO IT?  To educate and inspire  To pass on messages worthy of debate  To get attention
    • OFFLINE INFLUENCERS 60% OF OPINION FORMERS HOW DO THEY SHARE?  Face to face or over the phone HOW DO THEY HEAR?  Traditional media (TV and radio) 62% TRUST THEM WHY DO THEY MATTER?  Individually they have small networks but together they make 64 PEOPLE IN NETWORK up the majority of opinion leaders  They are often seen as valued specialists in key areas 48%  When offline influencers start talking, Word of Mouth goes PASS ON INFO AT LEAST DAILY mainstream WHY DO THEY DO IT?  To share ideas they they feel can help or benefit others  To enjoy sharing different perspectives  Offline Influencers’ motivation is characteristically altruistic
    • THE GLOBAL BALANCE OF WORD OF MOUTH USA UK GERMANY HONG KONG SPAIN INDIA UAEMEXICO AUSTRALIA In Hong Kong, India and the United Arab Emirates, technology has a greater role shaping Word of Mouth In established markets, Offline Influencers dominate through sheer weight of numbersKEY: Proportion of Hub urbanites, Email evangelists and Offline influencers amongst Opinion Leaders
    • DIFFERENCES REFLECTED IN NETWORKS UK (67) USA (70) GERMANY HONG KONG (71) (100) SPAIN (46) UAE (81) MEXICO (59) INDIA (103) AUSTRALIA (69) In developed economies, national networks predominate Key emerging markets have larger, technology-driven networks that cross international boundaries Technology can define network size KEY: Proportion of international contacts within (in Mexico SMS has a larger role) opinion leaders’ networks (70) Average size of Network
    • WHAT DO THESE OPINIONLEADERS HAVE IN COMMON? They are all trusted - and trust matters (59% of opinion leaders say they seek advice from someone they trust) They spread positive word of mouth (64% of messages passed on about different categories are positive, only 2% are negative, 28% are neutral) Opinion leaders shape stories rather than just passing them on - it is opinions as well as facts that they are keen to share (50% of all Word of Mouth represents stories from the media overlaid by opinion) It is only when all three Opinion Leaders start talking that Word of Mouth enters the mainstream
    • FEELING POSITIVE  66% Positive 2% Negative Most positive on: Food and drink, Luxury goods, Technology science and environment  61% Positive 3% Negative Most positive on: Food and drink. Luxury goods, Sports and health  73% Positive 2% Negative Most positive on: Food and drink, Technology science and environment,, Entertainment
    • WORD OF MOUTH IN ACTIONHub Urbanite:Email Influencers:OfflineEvangelist:“I shareamostnews buff so I have blog information am quite a on Blogger,updating pretty good atguess am it 4-6 times parentswith my husband, my perweek. in the know’...being Most recently IMyand my sister, then my closestpurchased a digital camerafeeling is that if face to facefriend – usually a product isand posted aboutgood, phone.…” it know;or by people should on my ifblog, recommending itit’s not - people shouldandAmazon.com to others.”know.”For Offline Influencers,Word of Mouth is aHub urbanites tendEmail Evangelists havenatural element of to apost information certainstrong sense not arelationships,that wherethey oftypeswill get kudos formission information needtheir circulatedto be knowledge - but theyare selective about whatinformation qualifies
    • MEDIA DRIVE WORD OF MOUTHTHERE ARE THREE KEY POINTS AT WHICH MEDIA CHANNELSINFLUENCE OPINION LEADERS FINDING OUT NEWS RESEARCHING FURTHER - DECISION TO SPREAD THE OR INFORMATION AND FORMING OPINIONS WORD To see the roles played by different media channels, we looked at some real examples
    • THE DEATH OF MICHAEL JACKSONOPINION LEADERSHEARD THE STORYFIRST THROUGH TVWE ASKED OPINION 45% DISCOVEREDLEADERS HOW THEY FIRST THE NEWSLEARNED ABOUT MICHAEL ON TVJACKSON’S DEATH COMPARED TO 23% 15% 12% 2%
    • THE DEATH OF MICHAEL JACKSONYET ONLINE TOOKOVER WHEN IT CAMETO FINDING OUT MORE 85% FOUND OUTAND FORMING MORE ONLINEOPINIONS COMPARED TO 12% 35% 12% 22%
    • WHERE DO OPINIONS COME FROM ONLINE? OPINION LEADERS TURN TO ESTABLISHED MEDIA BRANDS ON THE WEBMAJOR INTERNATIONAL MAJOR INTERNATIONAL MAJOR INTERNATIONALNEWS SITES: 66% NEWS SITES: 61% NEWS SITES: 74%LOCAL NEWS SITES: 69% LOCAL NEWS SITES: 56% LOCAL NEWS SITES: 72%NEWS FORUMS: 9% NEWS FORUMS: 12% NEWS FORUMS: 21%
    • THIS FOCUS ON TRUST BENEFITS THE BBCWhich of the following do you think is a trustworthy source of news? By size of network 70% Smaller network Have personal and private networks of at least 75 each 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% BBC.com BBC World News
    • THE BBC IS PARTICULARLY TRUSTEDBY OPINION LEADERS Why opinion leaders say they trust BBC...In UK, 94% of OLs trust BBC.com or BBC WorldNews “Because of their unbiased opinions and news coverage.” “The rest are typically Indian wishy washy about facts.” “It gives balanced media coverage.”In UAE, 74% of OLs trust BBC.com and 75% trustBBC World News (India focus groups)In India, 72% of OLs trust BBC.com and 71% trustBBC World News
    • DISCOVERY AND OPINION FORMINGMAINSTREAM MEDIA BRANDS DRIVE THE PROCESS Mainstream media dominate when it comes to breaking news: TV was the main source for all 3 groups and radio also played a key role Yet online is increasingly integrated for early-stage Opinion Leaders: 29% of Email Evangelists and 30% of Hub Urbanites discovered the news online Opinion Leaders turn to established media brands online when they come to research a story: 74% of Hub Urbanites, 66% of Offline Influencers and 61% of Email Evangelists use major international news sites Social media users are more not less engaged with mainstream media brands It is mainstream media (not UGC) that triggers Word of Mouth
    • THE STORY:“SPOTIFY MAKES MORE MONEY FOR UNIVERSAL THAN ITUNES”THE TRIGGERMAINSTREAM MEDIA IS REQUIREDTO IGNITE WORD OF MOUTH The point at which a story becomes a Word of Mouth moment is sometimes instantaneous But it sometimes occurs weeks or months after a story appears The trigger is typically an appearance on a mainstream media channel The conversations of Hub urbanites can pre-date the Word of Mouth moment But engaging the interest of Email evangelists may require a mainstream media “push”
    • BRAND STRATEGIES FOR WORD OF MOUTHCHANNELS AND TRIGGERS Opinion Leaders credit advertising and marketing with driving 58% of Word of Mouth Word of Mouth is predominantly positive Embrace it as an opportunity, remove barriers and make it easy to share Opinion forming is important Suggest links and connections, provide channels for sharing opinions Professional media stimulate social media Editorial content and advertising have a crucial role in driving awareness The newest social media channel is not necessarily the most influential An integrated strategy across both media and communications channels is vital
    • ACTING ON WORD OF MOUTH  Patterns show the importance of specialist opinion leaders in certain key categories  Key influencers pass on information, larger numbers of opinion leaders act on it
    • HOW TO ACTIVATEOFFLINE INFLUENCERSKEY CATEGORY RELATIONSHIPS: Luxury They are particularly likely to respond to special promotions Sports and Health Media stories drive Word of Mouth but they are less DRIVEN TO SHARE BY… interested in special promotions in this category - pundits rather than fitness fanatics PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: 56% Food and Drink Big fans - most keen on sharing recent purchases and special STORIES IN THE MEDIA: 44% offers MARKETING/BRAND: 10%MOST INFLUENTIAL ON: Politics, Entertainment, Food and DrinkHOW DO YOU GET THEM INTERESTED? Play to their areas of expertise with positive brand interaction: bespoke offers and tailored information
    • HOW TO ACTIVATEEMAIL EVANGELISTSKEY CATEGORY RELATIONSHIPS Luxury They love recommending products they have bought Entertainment Especially keen to keep networks informed about stories they DRIVEN TO SHARE BY… have heard in the media Finance PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: 46% A strong interest and keen to share advice STORIES IN THE MEDIA: 38%MOST INFLUENTIAL ON: MARKETING/BRAND: 19% Finance, BusinessHOW DO YOU GET THEM INTERESTED? Give them something to talk about. And keep them in the loop on big stories. They love to share content and will spread value propositions and offers if they are compelling enough
    • HOW TO ACTIVATEHUB URBANITESKEY CATEGORY RELATIONSHIPS: Technology They like sharing their expertise through forums but are less interested in special offers in this category Entertainment They love commenting by text while watching TV DRIVEN TO SHARE BY… Finance They are keen to share experience and information, but less PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: 65% likely to share this information through social media STORIES IN THE MEDIA: 57%MOST INFLUENTIAL ON: SPECIAL OFFERS: 49% They are the most likely to discuss any subject: favourite topics are Science and Technology and Entertainment and they over-index particularly highly on Arts and CultureHOW DO YOU GET THEM INTERESTED? They demand relationships and rewards for putting their reputation on the line. Reinforce their position as experts with specialist, exclusive news (and never mass PR)
    • WHAT’S THE MEANING?WORD OF MOUTH, MEDIA ANDMARKETING Word of Mouth has not supplanted mainstream media brands It multiplies their influence Trust is now the essential quality for both brands and media - since trust is the most valued asset of Opinion Leaders Personal experience can initiate Word of Mouth but Word of Mouth rarely becomes large-scale without a push from mainstream media or marketing activity Because of this, Word of Mouth can be understood, predicted and planned