William Peacock & Phyllis Hyom
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William Peacock & Phyllis Hyom

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PIONEER HISTORY OF

PIONEER HISTORY OF
William Peacock Jr. (1810 – 1875) &
Phyllis Hyom (1810 – 1890)

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    William Peacock & Phyllis Hyom William Peacock & Phyllis Hyom Document Transcript

    • PIONEER HISTORY OF William Peacock Jr. (1810 – 1875) & Phyllis Hyom (1810 – 1890) Files of: Erma P. Gordon Anderson (additions by Joe Anderson) Joe Anderson: A Great Greatgrandson ====================================================================== William Peacock Jr. Born: 9 May 1810 at Watford, Hertfordshire, England Died: 25 May 1875 at Smithfield, Cache, Utah Phyllis Hyom Peacock Born: 5 Jul 1810 at St.Albans, Hertfordshire, England Died: 12 Oct 1890 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah Buried: Smithfield, Cache Co., Utah Married: 9 Nov 1834, Watford, Hertfordshire, England Saint James, Paddington, London, England https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NV6H-T42 Watford & St. Albans were fairly cosmopolitan towns during the mid 1800’s. But let’s remember life could be rather grueling for middle class working families in England. Children went to work at age 10- 12 and 12 to 14 hour days were common. This being much different than the “wild west” of Northern Utah during mid to late 1800. St James, Paddington, London
    • Watford, Hertfordshire, England St.Albans, Hertfordshire, England http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watford Watford is a town and district in Hertfordshire, England situated 21 miles northwest of London. The borough lies just to the north of Greater London. Watford remained an agricultural community with some cottage industry for many centuries. The Industrial Revolution brought the Grand Junction Canal in 1798 and the London and Birmingham Railway in 1837, both located here for the same reasons the road had followed centuries before, seeking an easy gradient over the Chiltern Hills. Water: Watford is on the main Grand Union Canal route northwards from London. Today there is little commercial use, since the advent of the railway, but the canal is used for recreational purposes. The River Gade and the River Colne also run through Watford. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abbots_Langley Abbots Langley, Hertford or Hertfordshire, England, is listed as William Peacock Jr.’s birthplace in some genealogical reports. Abbots Langley is a village in the English county of Hertfordshire. Economically the village is closely linked to Watford part of the Rural District of Watford., until 1974. Now is included in the Three Rivers district. Hertfordshire, Watford, Canal Locks 1900's - Hertfordshire, Watford, High Street late 1900's
    • Hertfordshire, Watford, Hertfordshire, Watford, Grove Mill Lane Cassiobury Park Canal Locks Watford Horticultural & St Mary's Parish Church Floricultural Show, Cassiobury Park Watford, Hertfordshire, England Illustrated London News, 1855 Navigation Bridge From Britton's Cassiobury, The Canal, Cassiobury Park, Watford published 1837
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Albans St Albans is the main urban area of the City and District of St Albans in southern Hertfordshire, England, around 22 miles north of central London. It was originally named Verlamion by the Ancient British, Catuvellauni tribe. It was the first major town on the old Roman road of Watling Street for travelers heading north and became the Roman city of Verulamium. After the Roman withdrawal, and prior to becoming known as St Albans, the town was called Verlamchester or Wæclingacaester. The mediaeval town grew up on the hill to the east of this around the Benedictine foundation of St Albans Abbey. This at the spot where tradition has it that St Alban, the first British Christian martyr, was beheaded sometime before AD 324. It was, at one time, the principal abbey in England and the first draft of Magna Carta was drawn up there, reflecting its political importance. The Abbey Church, now St Albans Cathedral (formally the Cathedral & Abbey Church of St Alban but still known locally as The Abbey) became the parish church when it was bought by the local people in 1553, soon after the priory was dissolved in 1539. It was made a cathedral in 1877 when the City Charter was granted. The Clock Tower, the only medieval example in the country. From the beginning it had a mechanical clock, a great rarity at that time. As the Abbey also had one, this was probably the reason for having the same. Indeed, the Clock Tower itself seems to have been intended as a visible statement of St. Albans' civic ambitions against the power of the Abbot. It was both a look out as well as a curfew, ringing out the times when people had to be indoors "covering the fire". Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Albans, (22 January 1561 – 9 April 1626) was an English philosopher, statesman, scientist, lawyer, jurist, author and pioneer of the scientific method.
    • St Albans and Watford are about 8 miles apart William Peacock Jr. and Phyllis Hyom Peacock MARRIED 9 Nov 1834 at Watford, Hertfordshire, England, and were sealed 28 Nov 1866, at Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Utah Name/Date Born William Peacock Jr. B: 9 May 1810 Emigrated 1866 Phyllis Hyom B:5 Jul 1810 Emigrated 1866 CHILDREN Their children were all born in Watford, Hertfordshire, England. William John B:14 Sep 1834 Died: 2 May 1849 (drowned) 14 yr. 8 mo. old Harriet Louisa B: 10 Nov 1836 Emigrated 1863 Alfred James B: 4 Mar 1838 Emigrated 1856 John B: 11 Dec 1839 Died: 22 May 1852 - Abt 12 ½ yrs. old. Mary Ann “Annie” B: 19 Mar 1842 Emigrated 1863 Emily Ellen B: 25 Jan 1844 Emigrated 1861 Martha B: 8 Jan 1848 Emigrated 1866 Thomas Joseph B: 13 Apr 1851 Emigrated 1866 Clara Elizabeth Jane B: 19 Jul 1854 Emigrated 1866
    • Perpetual Emigrating Fund The Church inaugurated the Perpetual Emigrating Fund Company (PEF) in 1849. The PEF used Church assets and private contributions to assist poor emigrants from the eastern U.S. and Europe on their journey to the Salt Lake Valley. The funds were extended as a loan rather than as a gift, and sponsored emigrants signed a note obligating themselves to repay the PEF after they arrived in Utah. This obligation could be met through cash, commodities, or labor. It is estimated that prior to its dismantling in 1887, the PEF assisted more than 30,000 people to travel to Utah by wagon, by pulling a handcart or (after 1869) by rail. Peacock, William, 1866, Perpetual Emigration Fund (Book)-Microfilm 25686 Peacock, Phillis, 1866, Perpetual Emigration Fund (Book)-Microfilm 25686 Peacock, Martha, 1866, Perpetual Emigration Fund (Book)-Microfilm 25686 Peacock, Thomas, 1866, Perpetual Emigration Fund (Book)-Microfilm 25686 Peacock, Clara, 1866, Perpetual Emigration Fund (Book)-Microfilm 25686 William Peacock Jr. and Phyllis Hyom Peacock along with their three youngest children: Martha, Thomas Joseph, and Clara Elizabeth Jane. 6 Jun 1866 Departed: Liverpool, England aboard the ship “St Mark” 24 Jul 1866 Arrived: New York, New York, USA 26 Jul 1866 Departed: New York 3 Aug 1866 Arrived: Wyoming, Nebraska 8 Aug-1866 Departed: Wyoming, Nebraska with Scott Co. and Lowery Co. 8 Oct-1866 Scott Co. Arrived: Salt Lake City, Utah, William, and 2 children 22 Oct-1866 Lowery Co. Arrived: Salt Lake City, Utah, Phyllis & Martha (SEE NOTES at end) The family made their home in Smithfield, Cache Co., Utah Smithfield, Cache Co., Utah William and Phyllis Peacock were sealed, 28 Nov 1866, at Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Utah, William Peacock, Jr. Died 25 May 1875, Smithfield, Cache, Utah Phyllis Hyom Peacock Died 12 Oct 1890 at SLC, Utah; buried at Smithfield,Cache Co.,Utah
    • FOLLOWING IS AN ACCOUNT OF THEIR IMMIGRATION FROM ENGLAND TO UTAH. ST MARK PASSENGER LIST MORMON IMMIGRATION INDEX British Mission Registers PEACOCK, William <1810> St.Mark 1866 Age:56 Origin: England Occ:Painter Note:BMR,p.291. PEACOCK, Thomas J. <1851> St.Mark 1866 Age:15 Origin: England Occ:Laborer PEACOCK, Clara E. J.<1855>St.Mark 1866 Age:11 Origin: England PEACOCK, Phillis <1810> St.Mark 1866 Age:56 Origin: England Occ:Wife Note: SMR, p.291; Listed on the St. Mark [6 Jun 1966]"Did not go"(BMR). PEACOCK, Martha <1848> St.Mark 1866 Age:18 Origin: England Occ:Spinster Note: SMR, p. 291; Listed on the St. Mark [6 Jun 1866]"Did not go"(BMR). I believe: Phyllis Hyom Peacock<1810> Age 56 and daughter Martha Peacock<1848> Age 18 DID GO & were aboard the St Mark. Probably as paid passengers. (SEE NOTE AT END). Ship: St. Mark http://mormonmigration.lib.byu.edu/Search/showDetails/db:MM_MII/t:voyage/id:335/keywords:St.+Mark+1866 Date of Departure: 6 Jun 1866 Port of Departure: Liverpool, England LDS Immigrants: 104, Church Leader: Alfred Stevens Date of Arrival: 24 Jul 1866, Port of Arrival: New York, New York The second cabin was occupied by 95 adult passengers, members of the Church of Latter-day Saints. Elder Alfred Stevens, an English sea captain, was appointed president and unanimously sustained by the vote of the Saints. The Saints were suitably instructed in relation to the voyage, and were promised a safe passage on conditions of due diligence to all their duties. . . ." Autobiography and Diary of William Edmund Gooch ". . . On the 6th June 1866 instant the fine packet ship Saint Mark cleared from Liverpool for New York, carrying several hundred emigrants. The second cabin was occupied by 95 adult passengers, members of the Church of Latter- day Saints. Elder Alfred Stevens, an English sea captain, was appointed president and unanimously sustained by the vote of the Saints. The Saints were suitably instructed in relation to the voyage, and were promised a safe passage on conditions of due diligence to all their duties. . . ." Autobiography and Diary of William Edmund Gooch […] 4 June 1866 - Through the wonderful assistance of the Lord I am safe on board the ship St. Mark leaving all I had behind me. Nothing but divine power could have brought me away from my beloved family. 15 June 1866 I have a little work to teach a few boys since the 9th but some seem to care more for play and eating then come an hour to receive instruction. We have many things yet to learn before Zion is perfected 27 June 1866 - I have been poorly for the last 4 days haven taken cold and have stomach disorders. Windy. Brought on bad circulation. The ordinance received and feel better. Lord, strengthen my heart and faith in thee. 29 June 1866 – […] I am in tolerable health this morning.
    • 7 July 1866 - Felt thankful for a wind to deliver us from our prison here and gratitude for my Father's care. I went to the forepart of the ship at bedtime. Felt a whisper to go back to the other side of the vessel for such is the desperate state of the sailors. They would throw any Mormons overboard if they could do it in the dark. 24 July 1866 - Landed at New York on the 24th of July 1866 after a fun, but long, voyage. Got registered at Castle Garden. Left there, passed through Canada by New Haven to Montreal, Toronto up to Point Edward cross the river. St. Clair to Fort Huron, passed on to Quincy, ILL. crossed the Mississippi, then onward to St. Joseph, MO. Embarked on a steamer, got to Wyoming [Nebraska] on the 3rd in the afternoon. Cattle Garden, New York: The customs immigration receiving area . First name Surname Occup, Age Sex Arrived Origin Ship William Peacock Farmer 56 M 24 Jul 1866 England Saint Mark Thomas J. Peacock Child 5 M 24 Jul 1866 England Saint Mark Clara Peacock Child 11 F 24 Jul 1866 England Saint Mark Phyllis Hyom Peacock and Martha Peacock still do not show up at Castle Garden, New York BUT I believe they were there. SEE NOTE at end Castle Gardens  DEPART: FROM NEW YORK TO WYOMING, NEBRASKA "Returned," Deseret News [Weekly], 19 Sept. 1866 “Elder Taylor informs us that the immigration traveled from New York this season by a new route, by New Haven, through Connecticut, into Massachusetts, then to Vermont, and by the Vermont Central line to Canada; thence west. This route, although longer, proved healthier than that usually traveled by our immigration, while the cost of transportation was $5 per head cheaper than by any other line. Br. Taylor speaks in very high terms of Lansing L. Millis, Esq., of the Vermont Central line, who contributed in every way he could to make the passengers comfortable and expedite their progress. Autobiography and Diary of William Edmund Gooch (aboard the St Mark) “Got registered at Castle Garden. Left there, (by train) passed through Canada by New Haven to Montreal, Toronto up to Point Edward cross the river. St. Clair to Fort Huron, passed on to Quincy, ILL crossed the Mississippi, then onward to St. Joseph. Embarked on a steamer, got to Wyoming, Nebraska on the 3 Aug 1866 in the afternoon.”
    • Autobiography and Diary of William Edmund Gooch (aboard the St Mark) “Got registered at Castle Garden. Left there, passed through Canada by New Haven […] on to Quincy, ILL crossed the Mississippi, then onward to St. Joseph., Embarked on a steamer, got to Wyoming, Nebraska on the 3 Aug 1866 in the afternoon.” St. Joseph to Wyoming, Neb = 95 miles Got to Wyoming, Nebraska on the 3 Aug 1866 in the afternoon.” FROM WYOMING, NEBRASKA TO SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH http://www.xmission.com/~nelsonb/company.htm A list of Wagon Companies, not individuals. Pioneer Companies that Crossed the Plains latter part of 1866 Departure Post Departure Date Company Captain - Company Name or No. Number of People Wagons Arrival Date Roster 2 Wyoming, Nebraska 8-Aug-1866 Andrew H. Scott (8) About 300 49 8-Oct-1866 No roster 4 Wyoming, Nebraska 8-Aug-1866 Abner Lowery (10) 300 22-Oct-1866 J.H. 22 Oct 1866 1- The majority of names appearing in the St Mark Roster were with the Andrew H. Scott Co. Including Peacock, William, Thomas & Clara ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2- Phyllis Peacock is listed, with daughter Martha Peacock, as traveling with Abner Lowery Co. It may be that Martha Peacock and her future husband, Martin Luce meet along the way and were becoming “serious toward one another” Mother, Phyllis Peacock, decided to accompany her with the Abner Lowery Co. Martin Luce may have been a teamster with Abner Lowery Co. I can find no reference for him. Martha Peacock and John Martin Luas were married during 1866 – (SEE NOTE at end) http://www.lds.org/churchhistory/library/pioneercompany/0,15797,4017-1-262,00.html Andrew H. Scott Company (1866) Company: Andrew H. Scott Company (1866) Departure: Wyoming, Nebraska 8-9 August 1866 – Arrival in Salt Lake Valley: 7 October 1866 Company Information: About 300 individuals and 49 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post at Wyoming, Nebraska (the west bank of the Missouri River about 40 miles south of Omaha) View a list of individuals known to have traveled in this company. Peacock, William, Birth Date: 9 May 1810, Death Date: 21 May 1876, Gender: Male Age: 56 Peacock, Thomas Joseph, Birth Date: 13 Apr. 1851, Death Date: 15 June 1930 Gender: Male, Age: 15 Peacock, Clara Elizabeth Jane, Birth Date: 19 July 1854, Death Date: 22 June 1935, Gender: Female, Age: 12 Phyllis Peacock was originally included here, but later deleted. SEE NOTE at the end.
    • Autobiography of Andrew Jenson Andrew Jenson, born Anders Jensen, was a Danish immigrant and who became an Assistant Church Historian of LDS Church for much of the early-twentieth century It was the intention that our company should roll out of Wyoming on August 7th, but a terrible rain storm, accompanied by thunder and lightning, such as none of us from Scandinavia had ever experienced, visited the camp. The rain poured down in torrents nearly all day and the following night. The ground was thoroughly soaked by the downpour, and while the storm was at its worst the whole village seemed to be a perfect lake. Such storms occurred frequently in this locality in July and August every year. Wednesday, August 8, 1866, will always remain a red-letter day in my recollection. At 10:00 o'clock in the forenoon, as passengers in Capt. Andrew H. Scott's ox train, we left Wyoming, [Nebraska] to cross the plains. Our teams pulled out slowly, traveled five miles out on the prairie and encamped on the brow of a hill where we remained till the next day. The rations allowed consisted of 1 1/2 pounds of flour and one pound of bacon each day for each adult besides sugar, molasses, dried fruit, and other eatables, all of which we were to cook and prepare ourselves to suit our respective tastes. Some of us found the baking of bread and the cooking of meals in the open air a somewhat difficult task, as we had never done the like before, but after a few days practice we mastered the situation, and life on the plains soon became quite natural and pleasant to those of us who were young and hearty. To the older members of the company, and to those who had large families of children, the case was quite different. At several points on the journey we came in friendly contact with Indians, but we only saw a few buffaloes, for many of these noble animals had been wantonly destroyed by white hunters, thus wasting the food of the Indians, which made them very angry and while the Sioux Indians and other tribes showed hostilities to travelers generally, they usually distinguished between the "Mormon" caravans and others, and would steal from other travelers when they would leave the "Mormons" alone. Quite a number of the people in our company died on the plains, but I failed to make a record of them, as I as yet was an amateur in record-keeping During the early part of our journey we had plenty of food and some to spare, but on reaching the mountain country, where the temperature was colder, our appetites increased and yet our daily rations were cut down until we suffered for the lack of food, owing to the fact that the provisions which Capt. Scott's train had cached at different points on the road to be taken up and used when the train returned with emigrants, had been stolen by Indians, or perhaps renegade whites, so we were put on half rations which made us go hungry at times. Before we reached places where our stock of provisions could be replenished, we suffered considerably, and I, who was a robust and growing boy with a good appetite, could at times think of nothing more desirable than to live long enough to enjoy a square meal, or to have my appetite satisfied.
    • From South Pass on Sept. 21st Captain Scott sent the following telegram to President Brigham Young: "Encountered a very severe snow and wind storm for twelve hours while passing from Sage Creek over the Rocky Ridge. Some cattle were badly frozen, eight head died and fifty more are disabled. The snow was six inches deep, feed covered up, heavy wind from the northwest, very cold. Today fine weather, cattle looking better. Camp in good condition. Shall move from here tomorrow." On the 7th of October 1866 our train emerged from the mouth of Parley's Canyon Abner Lowry Company (1866) Phyllis Hyom & Martha Peacock http://www.lds.org/churchhistory/library/pioneercompany/1,15797,4017-1-22,00.html Company: Abner Lowry Company (1866) Departure: 13 August 1866 , Arrival in Salt Lake Valley: 22 October 1866 Company Information: 300 individuals were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post at Wyoming, Nebraska (the west bank of the Missouri River about 40 miles south of Omaha) View a list of individuals known to have traveled in this company. Peacock, Phyllis Hyom Birth Date: 5 July 1810, Death Date: 12 Oct. 1890 , Gender: Female, Age: 56 Peacock, Martha: Birth Date: 8 Jan 1848, Death Date: 1907, Gender: Female, Age: 19 ------------------------------------------------------------------- Rasmussen, Niels, [Autobiographical sketch], in Andrew Jenson, comp., Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 4 vols. [1971], 1:597. While staying two days at Wyoming, preparing for the journey across the plains, and during the early part of that journey, across the plains, the mortality continued among us at a fearful rate, until about one hundred persons out of a total of between two and three hundred had perished by the wayside. My own brother [Hans Peter] and mother [Rebecca] fell victims to the terrible disease Aug. 16th and 24th respectively, and were, like the other dead, buried without coffins, in shallow graves by the roadside, after being sewn up in sheets. The survivors passed on, never more to behold their lonely resting places again. We traveled in the ill-fated train in charge of Captain Abner Lowry, who was ably assisted by Elder Geo. Farnsworth, of Mount Pleasant, Sanpete County. His name will ever be held in affectionate remembrance by all the survivors from that fearful journey, especially by those who recovered from their sickness through his untiring efforts in alleviating their sufferings, which he did in many instances very successfully. Jensen, Julius, [Interview], in "Utah Pioneer Biographies," 44 vols., 15:98,100. The leader was Abner Lowry, and we traveled by ox team. I recall seeing buffalo while crossing the plains. The leader called a halt. There were fifty wagons in the company. These were stationed thirty to forty feet apart, all facing the oncoming herd. We could see a dust at first but had no more than got lined up as commanded, when the herd was on us. The buffalo went in between the wagons. We were afraid the teams would stampede, but the drivers held them <in> control. We had plenty of buffalo meat for quite a few days
    • A relief mule train, under Captain Arza E. Hinckley (sent out by Pres. Brigham Young), met us about four hundred miles east of Salt Lake City. All the orphans, of which there were many in our company, were taken by that train. This included our family, which now had been reduced to five in number. We arrived in Salt Lake City Oct. 7, 1866, while the main company, which lost nearly half their cattle in the snows in the mountains, reached the valley about two weeks later. The day after our arrival in Salt Lake City the orphan emigrants were all provided with homes. Got Back," Deseret News [Weekly], 10 Oct. 1866 GOT BACK.— Cap. Arza E. Hinckley returned to the city on Sunday night, bringing with him 10 wagons of the 20 he took away to meet the immigration, and 87 passengers brought from Cap. [Abner] Lowry's company. The other 10 wagons he sent back with different trains as they were needed. Cap. Hinckley carried assistance and supplies to all the companies as they might be required. He travelled east 450 miles until he met the last company— Cap. Lowry's— which he did in the midst of a snow storm. His arrival in their camp must have seemed like the visit of an angel. He then started on the return, bringing with him the number of passengers named. Cap. Lowry, he believed, would camp at Ham's fork on Sunday night. This is the last immigrant train [for 1866], and may be looked for about Wednesday 17th. "Got In," Semi-Weekly Telegraph, 11 Oct. 1866, 2. Capt. Arza E. Hinkley got back to the city on Sunday evening with about 70 of the immigrants from Capt. [Abner] Lowry's train— 450 miles east of this. Captain Lowry has probably by this time passed Ham's Fork. The prudential measures of the President in sending out Capt. Hinkley to render assistance to the late trains, have been singularly favored, and much credit is due to Capt. Hinkley, those who accompanied him, and those who fitted out that relief to the poor. We hope they will all get in before a change of weather. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- "Arrived," Semi-Weekly Telegraph, 25 Oct. 1866 :TUESDAY MORNING, 23 Oct. 1866 ARRIVED.—Yesterday evening, Captain [Abner] Lowry's expected train arrived. The company found very acceptable accommodations provided for them within the Immigrant yards, rear of Tithing Office. The company consisted chiefly of Swedes and Danes. Were ten weeks out from Wyoming. Quite a number of persons died on the journey, and a good number of cattle perished. Had severe weather all the way from Laramie: two feet of snow on the Summit, Friday night. Most of the company were on their winding way to find and make homes in Sanpete, before dark last evening.
    • Got In," Deseret News [Weekly], 24 Oct. 1866, 373. GOT IN.—Captain Abner Lowry's train of 60 wagons and about 100 passengers [started with 300 – about 70 “rescued” by Capt. Arza E. Hinkley - about 100 arrived in SLC ] got into the city on Monday, a little before noon. This is the last immigrant train of the season. They encountered some severe weather on the latter part of the trip; but the immigrants stood it very well. We are glad that this train has got in, and that all the immigration is safe in the Territory as early as it is. There was more mortality than ordinary in Cap. Lowry's train, in consequence of a malignant form of dysentery which afflicted many on the first part of the journey across the plains; but the deaths, we are happy to say, were not so numerous as was currently reported some time ago. After arriving in Salt Lake City, Utah the Peacock family moved on to Smithfield, Utah. NOTE: The following is a bit of documented events & speculation. Alfred James Peacock – 1856 * Alfred James Peacock is well documented as a passenger aboard the ship “Thornton” and as being a member of the Willie’s 4th Handcart Co. up to Fort Laramie, where he left. We have no further information about him other than his reported death 15 Jan 1891, Salt Lake City, Utah Emily Ellen Peacock - 1861 * Emily Ellen Peacock with her new husband, Thomas Smith and his daughter, were aboard “Monarch of the Sea” – 1861. * Emily Ellen Peacock is recorded as a passenger. However Thomas Smith obtained employment as a ships cook, to pay for his and his daughter’s passage. Therefore, he and his daughter are not listed as passengers aboard Monarch of the Sea. (SOURCE: Biography from Smithfield Historical Society) * They are all recorded as traveling to Utah with the John R. Murdock Company (1861) Emily Ellen Peacock Smith, Thomas Smith & daughter Sarah Ann Smith. They spent the rest of their life in Smithfield, Utah. Harriet Louisa Peacock - 1863 * 1863, Harriet Louisa Peacock is recorded as a passenger aboard the ship “Amazon” - 1863 * There are no records concerning which wagon train she traveled with, but she is listed as being with an “unknown company” during 1863. Based on PEF record. * SPECULATION: She may have traveled with her sister, Mary Ann “Annie” Peacock who was with the Horton D. Haight Co of 1863, but no documentation can be found to substantiate this. Church Historian looked at the records for me. The biography for Harriet uses the “Unknown Co.”. 6 Jan 2009 Dear Joe, “ I am sorry, but Harriet Louisa Peacock’s name is not listed in any of the church financial records that have been searched. I don’t know if this individual is related to you, but we do have a William Peacock in the Cache Valley church financial records shown as having traveled with the 1866 Andrew H. Scott Company. These church records are confidential and, unfortunately are not available to the general public. Best wishes with your search for your ancestors. Sister W., Church History Library”
    • Harriet Louisa Peacock married James Joseph Meikle and spent the rest of her life in Smithfield, Utah. Mary Ann “Annie” Peacock - 1863 * Harriet’s sister, Mary Ann “Annie” Peacock is identified as traveling with the Horton D. Haight Company (1863). (LDS Church financial records from Smithfield, Utah). On Tue, 12/2/08, Church.History.Library@ldschurch.org wrote: To: "Joe Anderson" Date: Tuesday, December 2, 2008 Dear Joe, I am certain that the Annie Peacock in the 1863 Horton D. Haight Company is yours. The financial records that are noted in connection with her are from Cache Valley, and I noted that your Annie died in Smithfield Many thanks for helping us identify her! Sister W., Church History Library, W.@ldschurch.org * Mary Ann “Annie” Peacock is not listed as a passenger aboard “Amazon” or any LDS chartered ship. * Mary Ann “Annie” Peacock married Thomas Pilgrim. His sister, Susan Pilgrim, and Harriet Louisa Peacock) were both recorded as a passenger aboard the “Amazon” 1863 * SPECULATION: I suspect Mary Ann “Annie” Peacock was also aboard “Amazon” in 1863; along with her sister, Harriet Louisa Peacock and her future sister-in-law, Susan Pilgrim All 3 went to Smithfield, Utah. Susan Elizabeth Pilgrim Died 1 May 1888 at Smithfield, Cache Co, Utah. * SPECULATION: I don’t know if she got employment with the “Amazon” ships crew, was missed (895 listed LDS passengers) when the passengers roll was being recorded, or was just hidden among the passengers, but I suspect she was aboard. Annie Peacock married Thomas Pilgrim.they lived at Smithfield, Utah. Annie Peacock died 5 Jan 1915 Smithfield, Cache, Ut THE REST OF THE FAMILY - 1866 FATHER: William Peacock MOTHER: Phyllis Hyom Peacock DAUGHTER: Martha Peacock, SON: Thomas Joseph Peacock DAUGHTER: Clara Elizabeth Jane Peacock Peacock, William; Peacock, Phillis; Peacock, Martha; Peacock, Thomas; Peacock, Clara; 1866, Perpetual Emigration Fund (Book)-Microfilm 25686 http://mormonmigration.lib.byu.edu/Search/showDetails/db:MM_MII/t:voyage/id:335/keywords:St.+Mark+1866 MORMON IMMIGRATION INDEX British Mission Registers PEACOCK, William <1810> St.Mark 1866 Age:56 Origin:England Occ:Painter Note:BMR,p.291. PEACOCK, Thomas J. <1851> St.Mark 1866 Age:15 Origin:England Occ:Laborer PEACOCK, Clara E. J.<1855>St.Mark 1866 Age:11 Origin:England PEACOCK, Phillis <1810> St.Mark 1866 Age:56 Origin:England Occ:Wife Note: SMR, p.291; Listed on the St. Mark [6 Jun 1966]"Did not go"(BMR). PEACOCK, Martha <1848> St.Mark 1866 Age:18 Origin:England Occ:Spinster Note: SMR, p. 291; Listed on the St. Mark [6 Jun 1866]"Did not go"(BMR).m
    • http://www.lds.org/churchhistory/library/pioneercompany/1,15797,4017-1-262,00.html Andrew H. Scott Company (1866) View a list of individuals known to have traveled in this company. Peacock, William, Birth Date: 9 May 1810, Death Date: 21 May 1876, Gender: Male Age: 56 Peacock, Thomas Joseph, Birth Date: 13 Apr. 1851, Death Date: 15 June 1930 Gender: Male, Age: 15 Peacock, Clara Elizabeth Jane, Birth Date: 19 July 1854, Death Date: 22 June 1935, Gender: Female, Age: 12 Phyllis Peacock was originally listed here, and later deleted. SEE NOTE at end http://www.lds.org/churchhistory/library/pioneercompany/1,15797,4017-1-22,00.html Abner Lowry Company (1866) View a list of individuals known to have traveled in this company. Peacock, Phyllis Hyom Birth Date: 5 July 1810, Death Date: 12 Oct. 1890 , Gender: Female, Age: 56 Peacock, Martha: Birth Date: 8 Jan 1848, Death Date: 1907, Gender: Female, Age: 19 ----------------------------------------------------- SPECULATION Phyllis Hyom & Martha Peacock were aboard the “St Mark” St Marks Passenger List: Phyllis Hyom Peacock and Martha Peacock are shown with a note “DID NOT GO” in Mormon Immigration Index and they are not shown at Castle Garden. They are not aboard any other ships of the period. But they showed up in Wyoming, Nebraska at the same time as the rest of the Peacock family and the rest of the St Mark passengers. MARTHA PEACOCK SPECULATION: As a 19 year old, young lady, I expect Martha was a real handful for her parents. She had friends and “a life” in England and her parents are “dragging her away”. When they arrive at the “St Mark” and she looks at the accommodations, she informs her parents “I AM NOT GOING TO LIVE IN THOSE ACCOMIDATIONS, I AM NOT GOING”. An intense discussion ensues, until an alternative accommodation can be made. Out of concern for the rational behavior of a 19 year old, her mother, Phyllis, accompanies her with the “new accommodations”; probably as paid passengers instead of PEF passengers, aboard the St. Mark. Father and the younger children, Thomas & Clara, continues on as PEF passengers. The St Mark’s carried “several hundred emigrants” but just 95 PEF emigrants. Finally, they are underway and make their way to Wyoming, Nebraska. They are all schedule to travel with the Andrew H. Scott Co. [Round trip teamsters DO NOT appear on the wagon train roster (SLC to Neb and back to SLC) . Hundreds of young men in Utah preformed this work and many meet their brides this way] SPECULATION: Martha meets Martin Luce, possibly a teamster (from SLC) for the Abner Lowry Co. An attraction develops and Martin Luce invites Martha Peacock to travel with him. Mother, Phyllis, says “No Way”, but compromises and decided she will travel with her daughter and the Abner Lowry Co. Father, William and two younger children, continue on with Andrew H. Scott Company. Mother, Phyllis and daughter, Martha, travel with Abner Lowry Co. Both Co.’s are expected to be very close to one another during the journey to Utah. However. they got separated and the Lowry Co. had a much more difficult journey. This is speculation. Family records show Martha Peacock married John Martin Luce in 1866 or 1868 Notice different spellings LUCE & LUAS
    • 1880 United States Census: Household: Marital Birth- Father’s Mother’s Name Relation Status Gender Race Age place Occupation Birthplace Birthplace ----------------- --------- ------ --------- ----- ---- ---------- -------------- ----------- ------------ Martin LUAS Self M Male W 42 UT Teamster ME ME Martha LUAS Wife M Female W 30 ENG Keep House ENG ENG Nelie LUAS Daugh S Female W 12 UT Home UT ENG Frank LUAS Son S Male W 11 UT ---- UT ENG Alfred LUAS Son S Male W 7 UT ---- UT ENG Martha LUAS Daugh S Female W 5 UT ---- UT ENG Hattie LUAS Daugh S Female W 2 UT ---- UT ENG *Phillis PEACOCK,Mother L Widow Female W 69 ENG Keep House ENG --- Thomas PEACOCK Bro L, S Male W 29 ENG Farms --- ENG *Phyllis Hyom Peacock is the mother of Martha Peacock Luas and Thomas Peacock, Mother-in Law to Martin Luas and Grandmother to the children. Phyllis Hyom Peacock's husband was William Peacock Jr.<1810> He died: 1875 at Smithfield, Utah TO: <.W..@ldschurch.org> Dear Sister W. The Peacock branch of my ancestors have given me some interesting investigation challenges. You have been a significant help with this. My last (I hope) Peacock question:. 1- How did Phyllis Hyom Peacock end up being listed with both the Andrew H. Scott Company (1866) and the Abner Lowry Company (1866). 2- Why is daughter Martha Peacock (and her mother Phyllis) shown as being with the Abner Lowry Co (1866) when the rest of the family is shown with the Andrew H. Scott Co. (1866) 3- Was Martin Luce a teamster for the Abner Lowry Co (1866) ?? You may not have anyway of knowing the answer, but I thought I should ask. At least I can add a little information to the names of individuals with the Abner Lowry Co. (1866) (Phyllis & Martha Peacock -This was providing birth, death dates & age for the data base). REPLY FROM <.W..@ldschurch.org> Dear Joe, OK, you stumped us for awhile, but I think we figured it out. Apparently Phyllis Hyom Peacock had been placed in the 1866 Scott company with her husband because when he paid on his PEF indebtedness, he said that he came in the 1866 Scott Company. We assumed that his family was with him. However, we have a hand-written roster for the 1866 Lowry Company that clearly lists Phyllis and her daughter Martha in the Lowry Company. There was no other member of the family with them. We do not have any kind of roster for the 1866 Scott Company, so we cannot confirm names through that. The tithing record for William Peacock is our most reliable source. The two companies left within days of each other—the Scott Company leaving 8-9 August and the Lowry company left 13 August. It is entirely possible that the family members had contact with each other along the way. We can only guess the reason why they did not travel together. Maybe a family history will give some clues.
    • I have deleted Phyllis Hyom Peacock from the 1866 Andrew H. Scott Company and she now only appears only on the 1866 Abner Lowry list with her daughter Martha. There is only one individual in the Lowry Company with the given name of Martin—Martin Lund, a returning missionary, born about 1824. Returning missionaries sometimes served as teamsters for companies going west, but this individual is 20 years older that Martha’s husband. We do not have a John Luce or John Luas in our system. I’m sorry I can’t give you more information on him. Thanks so much, Sister W.. 1841 England Census https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MQYD-TG7 "England and Wales Census, 1841," William Peacock, Watford, Hertfordshire, England name: William Peacock, event: Census, event date: 1841, gender: Male, age: 30 https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MQYD-TGW name: Phillis Peacock , gender: Female, age: 30 https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MQYD-TG4 name: Wm John Peacock, gender: Male, age: 5 https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MQYD-TGH name: Harriett Louisa Peacock, gender: Female, age: 4 https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MQYD-TGC name: Alfred James Peacock, gender: Male, age: 3 https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MQYD-TGZ name: John Peacock, gender: Male, age: 2 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://search.ancestryinstitution.com/cgi- bin/sse.dll?db=uki1851&h=6078630&indiv=try&o_vc=Record:OtherRecord&rhSource=8767 1851 England Census - Citation; Ancestry.com William Peacock age 40 Phillis Peacock age 40 Harriet Peacock age 14 Alfred Peacock age 13 John Peacock age 11 Anne Peacock age 9 Emily Peacock age 7 Martha Peacock age 3 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1870 "United States Census" index and images, FamilySearch, William Peacock in household of William Peacock, Utah, United States. https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MNCR-K2K Name: William Peacock Estimated Birth Year: 1810 Gender: Male Age in 1870: 60y Color: White, Birthplace: England Home in 1870: Smithfield, Utah, United States Household Gender Age Birthplace William Peacock M 60y England Phillis Peacock F 60y England Thomas Peacock M 19y England Clara Peacock F 16y England
    • Your tombstone stands neglected and alone. The name and date are chiseled out on polished, marbled stone. It reaches out to all who care. It is too late to mourn. You did not know that I exist. You died and I was born. Yet each of us are cells of you in flesh, in blood, in bone. Our heart contracts and beats a pulse entirely not our own. Dear Ancestor, the place you filled so many years ago. Spreads out among the ones you left who would have loved you so. I wonder as you lived and loved, I wonder if you knew That someday I would find this spot and come to visit you. Author Unknown FIND A GRAVE http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=181638 <= William Peacock http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=181606 <= Phyllis Hyom Peacock Burial: Smithfield City Cemetery , Smithfield, Cache County, Utah, USA Plot: B_23_2 and Plot: B_23_3