Lavina Noble Aiken Meikle
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Lavina Noble Aiken Meikle

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PIONEER HISTORY OF

PIONEER HISTORY OF
Lavina Noble Aiken Meikle (1839 – 1900)

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Lavina Noble Aiken Meikle Lavina Noble Aiken Meikle Document Transcript

  • PIONEER HISTORY OF Lavina Noble Aiken Meikle (1839 – 1900) 2nd wife of James Joseph Meikle Life sketch by Delva Ewing Kofoed; Typist Elaine Erickson Coleman SOURCES OF INFORMATION: Family History, James Kirkbride’s writings and personal information from her daughter Katie Meikle Ewing. ADDITIONS BY: Joe Anderson, 2007 (Great grandson of James Joseph Meikle and Harriet Louisa Peacock) ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Lavinia Noble Aiken Meikle Birth: Mar. 13, 1839, Irchester, Northamptonshire, England Death: Nov. 25, 1900, Smithfield, Cache County, Utah Lavinia was the 6th child of 11 children born to parents William Goodwin Noble and Mary Ann Harper Noble Irchester It is located about two miles south east of Wellingborough and 2 miles west of Rushden. It is also equidistant from London (65 miles to the south) and Birmingham (65 miles to the west). Included within the civil parish of Irchester are the hamlets of Little Irchester and Knuston Over the years, the village has 'migrated' from its original location upon the River Nene. Finds at the original site have shown traces of a Roman settlement upon a pre-invasion site. In the Middle Ages the village was known as Ernecestre, which by the time of the death of the Middle English tongue had become Archester. Irchester Parish. Historical Society publish a number of books about the history of the village
  • While the family lived in Irchester, Northamptonshire, England, they did their baking in a community bake oven which was in the middle of the town square. On Saturday they would take all their baking, which they did for Sunday, and bake in this community bake oven. All the shoes and clothes for the family were cleaned and prepared for Sunday on a Saturday. Not even a button was sewed on a piece of clothing on the Sabbath day. In 1848 the family moved to Yorkshire, and located at Great Horton, where her farther, William Goodwin Noble, labored in the surrounding towns as a traveling Elder until 1853. He then was called to preside over the Bradford Conference, and still later over Warwickshire and Birmingham Conferences. After a time the family began considering emigration to Utah. Lavinia’s sister, Rachel, died (1833), in England, before the family emigrated. Lavinia’s sister, Jane Ann, married and stayed in England Waterhouse Harper (Lavinia’s brother) came to America in February 22, 1854 aboard the ship “Windermere” Departed Liverpool, England 22 Feb 1854 and Arrived New Orleans, Louisiana 24 Apr 1854. He then traveled to St. Louis, Missouri. From William Aquilla Noble biography: “This brother stopped on his way to Utah at St. Louis, MO. where he received employment in a saw mill. On 22 Jan, while working a slab flew from the saw and killing him.” He was buried: 25 Jan 1856 at St. Louis, MO. Eliza Priscilla (Lavinia’s sister) left Liverpool, England on 28 Mar 1857 aboard the ship “George Washington” which arrived in Boston Harbor 20 Apr 1857. Also aboard the ship “George Washington” was Robert Lemming Fishburn, her future husband. She, along with others, made their way, by train and river boat, to Iowa and crossed the plains. Together with her future husband - Robert Lemming Fishburn, they were part of the 6th Handcart Company - Israel Evans Company – 1857. Eliza Priscilla Noble & Robert Lemming Fishburn were married: 3 Jun 1858, Lehi, Utah Co., Utah. William Goodwin Noble and his wife Mary Ann Harper Noble and their following children sailed on the ship “William Tapascott” on May 11, 1860. Those sailing were: William Goodwin Noble, age 49, a tailor Mary Ann, age 51 – Wife Mary Ann Harper Noble Henrietta, age 22 - Spinster Lavinia, age 20 - Spinster Aquilla, age 18 – Printer ----- William Aquilla Louisa, age 16 – Spinster ---- Louisa Rox Snow Zilpha, age 13 Leonora, age 12 ------- Leonora Triphenia Laura, age 9 --------- Laura Matilda ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Ship: William Tapscott Date of Departure: 11 May 1860 Port of Departure:Liverpool, England LDS Immigrants: 731 Church Leader: Asa Calkin Date of Arrival: 16 Jun 1860 Port of Arrival: New York, New York William Goodwin Noble, upon his arrival at New York was assigned to a two-year missionary service at Williamsburg, NY. The children had to rustle jobs for the home budget. Baby-sitting, house-cleaning, and taking in washing, were some of the things the women did to earn money
  • Eliza Priscilla and her husband Robert Leeming Fishburn, had moved to Smithfield, Utah and were planning on being merchants so Priscilla’s two sisters, Lavinia and Henrietta, came west earlier, during 1860; and the rest of the family came west in 1862. While crossing the plains LaVinia became good friends with Amelia Folsom, who became Brigham Young's last wife. Lavina and Amelia became lifelong friends. LaVinia said that she didn't have to walk too much because the young fellows would let them ride on their horses. Though the Noble family biographies do not indicate it, the “pioneer records” show that Harriet Amelia Folsom and family crossed the plains & mountains with Joseph W. Young Freight Train (1860) - REFER TO NOTE AT THE END OF THIS BIOBRAPHY CONCERNING HARRIET AMELIA FOLSOM YOUNG http://www.lds.org/churchhistory/library/pioneercompany/0,15797,4017-1-334,00.html Joseph W. Young Freight Train (1860) Departure Florence, Nebraska: 23 July 1860 Arrival in Salt Lake Valley: 3 October 1860 Company Information: About 100 individuals and 50 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post at Florence, Nebraska (now Omaha) Arrivals from the Plains," Deseret News [Weekly], 10 Oct. 1860, 249. On the evening of the 3d instant (3 October 1860), Captain Joseph W. Young arrived with his freight train, consisting of some thirty wagons, with ox teams, which have made the trip to the Missouri river and back this season. The cattle, which we did not see, are said to have returned in good order and condition, looking better than some that have only been driven from the States this year. Capt. E. D. Woolley, with a train of nine mule wagons, with which he went to the east from this city last spring for merchandize, was also in company, and several others, increasing the number of wagons that came in with Capt. Young to fifty one. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Lavinia and Henrietta, after arriving in Salt Lake City, Utah, made their way to Smithfield, Utah. It is assumed they lived, for a time, with their sister Eliza Priscilla and her husband Robert Leeming Fishburn. Lavinia’s brother, William Aquilla Noble, 1st left Williamsburg, NY for Utah one year before the rest of his family. He arrived at Smithfield, Cache County, Utah in 1861. After William Aquilla Noble’s arrival at Smithfield, he found a home with the Austin Shepherd Merrill family in the fort which had been established in Smithfield, Utah. He also found employment. While living with the Merrill family, he met and fell in love with their daughter, Sarah Cornelia, and they were married April 6, 1862, by Smithfield’s first bishop, John Glover Smith About a year after arriving in Smithfield, Utah, Lavinia married first husband Benjamin Burke Aiken. They were married 6 Nov 1861. Lavinia’s sister, Henrietta, Married George Henery Gilbert on 10 Feb. 1862 In the Spring of 1862, William Goodwin Noble and his family made their way by rail and river boat to Florence, Nebraska, where a company was being equipped to cross the plains by ox team. Father, William Goodwin Noble and wife Mary Ann Harper Noble and four children: (Louisa Rox Snow (18), Zilpha (18), Leonora Triphena (14) and Laura Matilda (12)) came across the plains with the Henry W. Miller Company.
  • Henry W. Miller Company (1862) Departure, Florence, Neb: 5 or 8 August 1862 Arrival in Salt Lake Valley: 17-18 October 1862 Company Information: 665 individuals and 60 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post at Florence, Nebraska (now Omaha). In Salt Lake City they were met by Robert Leeming Fishburn (daughter Eliza Priscilla’s husband) and George Henry Gilbert (daughter Henrietta’s husband). By ox team they were brought to Brigham City, Utah and then on to Smithfield, Utah. When they arrived in Smithfield in October of 1862, the family acquired a home (log cabin with a dirt roof), in the fort, from a family that was leaving. So, the family life went on in a work a day, God fearing way. This family had a great desire to serve God and build for themselves a good standing in the fort community to which they had become a part. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Lavinia’s first husband was Benjamin Burke Aiken. They were married 6 Nov 1861, about one year after Lavinia arrived in Smithfield, Utah. Three girls and one boy were born to them. CHILDREN Surbina Almeda, married William Scrowther; Fannie Lazelle, married John Roberts; Rachael Mary Ann, married Edwin Huntsberry; Harper Waterhouse, who never married. Benjamin Burke Aiken was a good man, born near Salem, Massachusetts, on February 29, 1829. The Aikens joined the Church around 1843 or 1844. They crossed from Massachusetts to get some free ($1.25 an acre) land in New York, Indiana and Illinois, and came on from Nauvoo to Utah. Benjamin was a body-guard for the prophet Joseph Smith. (His dagger is now in the possession of a great grandson, David Roberts of Logan, Utah.) He also made trips across the plains to help others. In 1860 he came to Smithfield and built a log house on the east line of the Summit Fort. Three years later, at the abandonment of the Fort, Uncle Ben moved across the road and built an adobe, two-room house. In 1872 Benjamin Aiken and Lavinia Noble Aiken were divorced. In the decree of divorce Mr. Aiken gave up the home to his children and to Mr. Meikle, and in the south west part of town built a small room for himself, and out buildings for his animals and poultry. He worked his small farm and did farm work for others to get means to help his children who were with their mother. The oldest being about 10 years of age. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • Lavinia became the 2nd wife of James Joseph Meikle. They were married: 11 Oct 1872. On 17 Oct 1872 they were Sealed in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Utah Lavinia had six daughters born to her during her second marriage. They were: CHILDREN LaVinia Priscilla Meikle, born in 1873, married James Kirby in 1898; Kate Violetta Meikle, born August 15, 1875, married Wickliff Anderson Ewing, June 15, 1904; Jessie Margaret, who died when she was 18 months old; Zelphia Meikle, born June 3, 1879, married Lindsay Lightfoot, January 12, 1899; Mamie Rebecca Meikle, born April 7, 1882, married Carl Nilson, June 5, 1902; Birdie Meikle, born September 11, 1884, married Frank Covey, September 1902. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Lavinia Noble Meikle was a kind, good homemaker. She gave great care to her children and was always very pleasant and personable. She had a great challenge to provide the needs and comfort for 10 children. She was a very good mid-wife and each summer she collected Herbs of all kinds and dryed them. When someone needed some medical aids she could mix a portion. People from all over Smithfield came for her medicine. They would bring a bottle filled with sugar as payment and she would empty out the sugar and fill the bottle with her remedy. The following are a few of her remedies: Canker medicine was made by the bread pan full. She used Kinniekinic gathered from the mountains, wild grape root, raspberry bark and leaves, burnt alum sugar and much more. Salve for sores made from balm-a- Gillaird buds and lard or some powder. She also made cough medicine. Lavinia also pierced ears. Children even brought their broken toys, especially dolls to her to be repaired. She (Lavinia) sang in the Noble choir and had a very sweet voice. She always had some dried corn nuts or something in her pocket to chew upon. She carried a small cup with her so that she could get a drink of water whenever she passed a ditch. Laivinia Noble Aiken Meikle died, 25 Nov 1900, when she was 61 of diabetes. My mother Kate Meikle Ewing thought she was a very old woman. Now that Kate Ewing is 91 ½ she can’t understand why she thought 61 was so old. Lavinia was buried in a plot in Smithfield Cemetery. It was one of the first with grass. Her daughters carried water from a block away to keep it green.
  • FIND A GRAVE http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=18098903 Lavinia Noble Meikle Birth: Mar. 13, 1839 Irchester, Northamptonshire, England Death: Nov. 25, 1900 Smithfield, Cache County, Utah, USA Burial: Smithfield City Cemetery , Smithfield, Cache County, Utah, USA Plot: C_42_4 Your tombstone stands neglected and alone. The name and date are chiseled out on polished, marbled stone. It reaches out to all who care. It is too late to mourn. You did not know that I exist. You died and I was born. Yet each of us are cells of you in flesh, in blood, in bone. Our heart contracts and beats a pulse entirely not our own. Dear Ancestor, the place you filled those many years ago. Spreads out among the ones you left who would have loved you so. I wonder as you lived and loved, I wonder if you knew That someday I would find this spot and come to visit you. Author Unknown
  • PARENTS William Goodwin Noble Born: 29 Mar 1811, Irchester, Northamptonshire, England Died: 14 Mar 1893, Smithfield,Cache Co,Utah Married: 7 or 13 Dec 1830, Irchester, Northamptonshire, England Mary Ann Harper Born: 16 Dec 1806, Pudsey, Yorkshire, England Died: 30 Nov 1881, Smithfield, Cache Co., Utah CHILDREN 1- Jane Ann B: 21 Jun 1831 Irchester, Northamptonshire, England D: 4 Jan 1919 Bradford, Horton, York, England 2- Rachel B: 28 Aug 1833 Irchester, Northamptonshire, England D: 1 Oct 1833 Irchester, Northampton, England 3- Harper Waterhouse B: 17 Sep 1834 Irchester, Northampton, England D: 22 Jan 1856 St. Louis, St. Louis, Mo 4- Eliza Priscilla B: 3 Apr 1836 Irchester, Northampton, England D: 30 Jun 1905 Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah 5- Henrietta B:10 Aug 1837 Irchester, Northamptonshire, England D: 10 Nov 1921 Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah 6- Lavinia B: 13 Mar 1839 Irchester, Northampton, England D: 25 Nov 1900 Smithfield, Cache, Utah 7- William Aquilla B: 4 May 1841 Irchester, Northampton, England D: 12 Dec 1880 Smithfield, Cache, Utah 8- Louisa Rox Snow B: 21 Oct 1843 Wellingborough, Northampton, England D:23 Oct 1876 Smithfield, Cache, Utah 9- Zilpha B: 6 Apr 1844 Irchester, Northampton, England D: 16 Jan 1923 Smithfield, Cache, Utah 10- Leonora Triphenia B: 12 Jan 1848, Irchester, Northampton, England D: 20 Jul 1929 Smithfield, Cache, Utah 11- Laura Matilda B: 17 Feb 1850 Great Horton, Yorkshire, England D: 14 Jan 1929 Smithfield, Cache, Utah . . . .
  • Lavina Noble Aiken Meikle friend, Harriet Amelia Folsom There were widespread rumors that the Gardo House was being built for Folsom's daughter, Harriet Amelia Folsom Young, who was allegedly Brigham Young's favorite wife. It was indeed Young's intent that Amelia would serve there as his official hostess. According to his daughter Susa Young Gates, family members agreed that Amelia, who was young, childless, refined, and talented, was the ideal wife to assume such large social responsibilities. Amelia had first become acquainted with President Young on October 3, 1860, when he welcomed the Folsoms' wagon company to Salt Lake City. Tall and graceful, with blue eyes and light brown hair, Amelia was intelligent and charming. She was also an accomplished pianist and vocalist. Young began courting her almost immediately; they married on January 24, 1863 Brigham Young and his wife Amelia Folsom Young in what is probably a composite photo. Gossip about this "favorite wife" has fueled popular interest in the Gardo House. There are several articles on the internet concerning Amelia Folsom and Brigham Young.