Quality Program Indicators: Academic & Affective Education Jodi Oslund SpEd 478: Educational Interventions MSUM Summer 2009
Quality Program Indicators (QPI): Academic Education <ul><li>Promote academic growth using various techniques that are app...
Tiers of RtI <ul><li>(http://www.rtsd26.org/District/Images/RTI.gif) </li></ul><ul><li>Tier 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Universal:...
Tier 2 Remedial Strategies <ul><li>Intermediate step between general education instruction and intensive individualized in...
Tier 3 Remedial Strategies <ul><li>Individualized intensive interventions delivered to students who have not responded to ...
Remedial Strategies for Reading <ul><li>Collaborative Strategic Reading (CSR) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Preview </li></ul></ul...
Remedial Strategies for Reading <ul><li>SQ3R </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Survey </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Question </li></ul></...
Remedial Strategies for Math <ul><li>4-Step Problem-Solving Approach  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Understand the Problem </li></...
Remedial Strategies for Math <ul><li>‘Real-life’ Assignments </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Link concepts being taught to students’...
Remedial Versus Compensatory Strategies <ul><li>When a student is not quite able to keep up, remedial strategies are used ...
Compensatory Strategies for Reading <ul><li>Reading strip or ruler </li></ul><ul><li>Magnifier or large print </li></ul><u...
Compensatory Strategies for Math <ul><li>Manipulatives for hands-on learning </li></ul><ul><li>Take test away from distrac...
Quality Program Indicators (QPI): Affective Education <ul><li>Help students acquire information, attitudes and skills that...
Seven Survival Skills by Tony Wagner <ul><li>Critical Thinking and Problem Solving </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration and Lea...
Social Skill Strategies  Cooperative/Collaborative Groups <ul><li>Set group goals </li></ul><ul><li>Promote teamwork </li>...
Compensatory Strategies  Study Skills & Organization <ul><li>Color coordinated binder, tabs, notebook folder </li></ul><ul...
Five Key Processes That Motivate by Allen N. Mendler <ul><li>Emphasize Effort </li></ul><ul><li>Create Hope </li></ul><ul>...
References: <ul><li>Burns, M. K., & Gibbons, K. A. (2008).  Implementing response-to-intervention in elementary and second...
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QPI: Academic & Affective Education

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QPI: Academic & Affective Education

  1. 1. Quality Program Indicators: Academic & Affective Education Jodi Oslund SpEd 478: Educational Interventions MSUM Summer 2009
  2. 2. Quality Program Indicators (QPI): Academic Education <ul><li>Promote academic growth using various techniques that are appropriate to individual learning needs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide comprehensive academic curriculum </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide modifications/alternatives to regular curriculum when needed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide systems accommodations to ensure least restrictive environment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide effective instruction </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Tiers of RtI <ul><li>(http://www.rtsd26.org/District/Images/RTI.gif) </li></ul><ul><li>Tier 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Universal: adherence to research-based core curriculum in general education </li></ul><ul><li>Benchmark assessment at least three times per year </li></ul><ul><li>Tier 2 </li></ul><ul><li>Targeted: small group interventions delivered as part of general education </li></ul><ul><li>At least monthly progress reporting </li></ul><ul><li>Tier 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Intensive: individualized interventions based on problem-solving methods </li></ul><ul><li>At least weekly progress reporting </li></ul>
  4. 4. Tier 2 Remedial Strategies <ul><li>Intermediate step between general education instruction and intensive individualized interventions </li></ul><ul><li>Allows for efficient resource allocation while assuring student success </li></ul><ul><li>Delivered through small-group instruction by using standard protocol interventions </li></ul><ul><li>Matches interventions to particular skill deficit(s) </li></ul>
  5. 5. Tier 3 Remedial Strategies <ul><li>Individualized intensive interventions delivered to students who have not responded to Tier 2 interventions </li></ul><ul><li>Problem-solving team (PST) finds effective intervention for individual student by following problem solving process </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify problem </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Analyze problem </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop Hypothesis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop Plan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Implement Plan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Evaluate Plan </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Remedial Strategies for Reading <ul><li>Collaborative Strategic Reading (CSR) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Preview </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Click or Clunk </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Get the Gist </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wrap Up </li></ul></ul><ul><li>This strategy is great because it integrates word identification, reciprocal reading, and cooperative learning to aid in decoding and comprehending. It also allows students to work in small cooperative groups, which helps students to achieve a deeper more complete understanding of the information </li></ul>
  7. 7. Remedial Strategies for Reading <ul><li>SQ3R </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Survey </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Question </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Read </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Recite </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Review </li></ul></ul>Choral and Paired Reading, as well as Repeated Readings are also excellent strategies – Practice, Practice, Practice! This strategy is great because it offers a step-by-step approach so that students are not overwhelmed with too much information at once.
  8. 8. Remedial Strategies for Math <ul><li>4-Step Problem-Solving Approach  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Understand the Problem </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Devise a Plan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Carry Out the Plan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Look Back </li></ul></ul><ul><li>This strategy is great because if offers an efficient step-by-step plan that allows students to perform better on applied math problems </li></ul>
  9. 9. Remedial Strategies for Math <ul><li>‘Real-life’ Assignments </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Link concepts being taught to students’ lives. For example, in a math lesson on estimating area, assign the task of calculating the area of their bedroom and estimating the amount of paint needed to cover the walls. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>This strategy is great because by linking concepts to ‘real life’ it makes math more meaningful to students </li></ul>
  10. 10. Remedial Versus Compensatory Strategies <ul><li>When a student is not quite able to keep up, remedial strategies are used to “nudge” him or her to catch up </li></ul><ul><li>When a student’s gap in learning is so severe that remedial strategies are not effective, compensatory strategies are employed so that the student is not penalized in other areas of learning </li></ul><ul><li>Compensatory strategies are ways to use strengths to compensate for weaknesses, for example: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If there is difficulty interpreting oral language, information can be given in written form </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If there is difficulty with reading, information can be given by audio tape/CD </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Compensatory Strategies for Reading <ul><li>Reading strip or ruler </li></ul><ul><li>Magnifier or large print </li></ul><ul><li>Recorded materials </li></ul><ul><li>Reading assistance </li></ul><ul><li>Pictures </li></ul><ul><li>Braille </li></ul><ul><li>Assistive Technology </li></ul>
  12. 12. Compensatory Strategies for Math <ul><li>Manipulatives for hands-on learning </li></ul><ul><li>Take test away from distractions </li></ul><ul><li>Have tests/assignments read to them </li></ul><ul><li>Lengthen time allotted for tests </li></ul><ul><li>Assistive Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Calculator </li></ul>
  13. 13. Quality Program Indicators (QPI): Affective Education <ul><li>Help students acquire information, attitudes and skills that will encourage appropriate behavior and mental health </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Systematically provide information and skills regarding behavior </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Include personal, relationship, and life skills </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Design curriculum based on individual needs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Employ good instructional practices </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Systematically plan and teach transference and maintenance of skills </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Seven Survival Skills by Tony Wagner <ul><li>Critical Thinking and Problem Solving </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration and Leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Agility and Adaptability </li></ul><ul><li>Initiative and Entrepreneurialism </li></ul><ul><li>Effective Oral and Written Communication </li></ul><ul><li>Accessing and Analyzing Information </li></ul><ul><li>Curiosity and Imagination </li></ul><ul><li> We must ensure that all students master the skills of critical thinking, communication, and collaboration to succeed as lifelong learners, workers, and citizens </li></ul>
  15. 15. Social Skill Strategies Cooperative/Collaborative Groups <ul><li>Set group goals </li></ul><ul><li>Promote teamwork </li></ul><ul><li>Signaling </li></ul><ul><li>Social skills group </li></ul><ul><li>Role-play </li></ul><ul><li>State expectations of behavior </li></ul>
  16. 16. Compensatory Strategies Study Skills & Organization <ul><li>Color coordinated binder, tabs, notebook folder </li></ul><ul><li>Assignment calendar, school planner </li></ul><ul><li>Assignment guideline sheets </li></ul><ul><li>Study buddy, study group </li></ul><ul><li>Time Management Skills </li></ul><ul><li>Test Taking Skills </li></ul>
  17. 17. Five Key Processes That Motivate by Allen N. Mendler <ul><li>Emphasize Effort </li></ul><ul><li>Create Hope </li></ul><ul><li>Respect Power </li></ul><ul><li>Build Relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Express Enthusiasm! </li></ul>
  18. 18. References: <ul><li>Burns, M. K., & Gibbons, K. A. (2008). Implementing response-to-intervention in elementary and secondary schools . New York: Routledge. </li></ul><ul><li>http:// www.ghsdss.com/special_ed/ipp/remed_comp / </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.jimwrightonline.com/php/interventionista/interventionista_intv_list.php?prob_type =mathematics </li></ul><ul><li>http:// www.ldao.ca/aboutLDs/Compensatory_jStrategies.php </li></ul><ul><li>Mendler, A.N. (2000). Motivating Students Who Don’t Care. Bloomington, IN : National Educational Service. </li></ul><ul><li>Neel, R.S., Cessna, K.K., Borock, J., & Bechard, S. Quality Program Indicators for Children with Emotional and Behavior Disorders. </li></ul><ul><li>Singham, M. (2005). Moving away from the authoritarian classroom. Change, 50-57. </li></ul><ul><li>Wagner, Tony (2008). Rigor Redefined . Educational Leadership. </li></ul>

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