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D4DLpres_oct2013
D4DLpres_oct2013
D4DLpres_oct2013
D4DLpres_oct2013
D4DLpres_oct2013
D4DLpres_oct2013
D4DLpres_oct2013
D4DLpres_oct2013
D4DLpres_oct2013
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D4DLpres_oct2013

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My work with scenarios in researching and teaching about mobile learning

My work with scenarios in researching and teaching about mobile learning

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  • 1. Who am I? Jocelyn Wishart University of Bristol, UK University researcher and teacher specialising in the use of new technologies to support education, especially science education What am I going to present? Draw on your students work and your own to tell us what should be in a scenario so that it communicates to (1) teachers, (2) other researchers.
  • 2. Scenarios, or simulated case studies, are a means of articulating issues from real-world experiences and of providing a vision or way forward for the future (Kamtsiou, Koskien, Naeve, Pappa & Stergioulas, 2006). Such an approach supports contextualisation of issues, exploration of multiple perspectives, reflection, and opportunities to develop collaborative solutions (Herrington, Oliver & Reeves, 2003). Their use in an ethics workshop (adapted from Howard, Lothen-Kline and Boekeloo (2004)) implies need for three elements: • The scenario. • An ethics framework, set of principles or ethical decision-making strategy in the context of which the scenario is to be considered. • A set of questions to stimulate ethical discussion of the scenario.
  • 3. Scenario: Where do you stop? Key Issue: Boundaries between formal-informal, public-private, home- school, real-virtual etc. Research question: What use can undergraduate university students make of social networks to support their formal learning? Description: This is a project funded by a National Teaching Innovation Grant and run by a university lecturer who is concerned that their topic is perceived by students to be a particularly ‘dry’ one. They are interested in developing their teaching to make more use of collaborative learning opportunities enabled by students using mobile phones to access social networking sites at a time and place convenient to them. They have set a task to be completed on line through, say, Facebook, where students work with each other on a set task.
  • 4. Scenario: Where do you stop? Questions to be considered: • Who should be asked for consent and how should they be informed? • When is a discussion ‘on task’ and thereby included and when is it ‘off- task’? • What are the pros and cons of having the lecturer as a ‘friend’? • What are they to do on coming across unexpectedly personal information? • How to anonymise the data? Other similar situations: Any research involving a mobile device that is used in personal as well as work contexts is likely to lead to access, wittingly or unwittingly, of personal information unrelated to the project. A participant may be unaware when giving consent to the research of the extent of the personal data stored on the phone.
  • 5. Each scenario to cover: • Sector • Subject • Pedagogy (teaching strategy and planned learning outcome) • Technology (device and apps) • Organisational/logistical issues with focus on practicalities (charging, coverage, replacement...) • Acceptance/attitudes • Sustainability/scalability issues • Ethical accessibility or m-safety concerns • Outcomes evaluation and • Acceptable use guidelines NB Currently rare to find scenarios of what didn’t work
  • 6. A Current Scenario: Handheld rather than mobile learning? James asked school students to use a school supplied PDA for four science learning activities in a Year 10 class: • Quick response (QR) codes linked to resources that allow students to find supporting information for the set task, • Camera to record stages in a chemistry experiment linking photos to appropriate equations, • E-book on Global Warming and • Data logging software and light gates to record velocity in an experiment exploring momentum. Students found data logging app difficult to understand and use but the other activities showed how e-books, mobile cameras and QR codes can empower learners to have increased choice and independence in how they approach their learning.
  • 7. References: Herrington, J., Oliver, R. & Reeves, T. ( 2003). Patterns of engagement in authentic online learning environments, Australian Journal of Educational Technology, 19(1). 59-71. Howard, D.E., Lothen-Kline, C., & Boekeloo, B.O. (2004). Using the case-study methodology to teach ethics to public health students. Health Promotion Practice, 5, 151-159. Kamtsiou, V., Koskinen, T., Naeve, A., Pappa, D., & Stergioulas, L. (2006). A glimpse at the future of technology enhanced-professional learning: Trends, scenarios and visions. In European Networking and Learning for the Future, Eden conference. Wishart , J. (2013) Ethical Issues in Mobile Learning: scenarios to aid research planning. Available at http://www.iamlearn.org/ethical-issues-mobile- learning/research-planning Traxler, J. & Wishart, J. (2011) Making Mobile Learning Work: Case Studies of Practice, Bristol: ESCalate: HEA Subject Centre for Education. Available at http://escalate.ac.uk/downloads/8250.pdf

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