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Attracting International Talent:CSW`s Lessons Learned: How can we take a strategic lead?                                  ...
Attracting International Talent:CSW`s Lessons Learned: How can we take a strategic lead?Contents.. Trends in international...
Attracting International Talent:Trends in International Migration (OECD).International Migration is a trend.          New ...
Attracting International Talent:Labour Market Trends.Occupational change (EU).          In european countries, engineering...
Attracting International Talent:Labour Market Trends.Labour Market Segmentation (EU) -» a R&S challenge.          50% low-...
Attracting International Talent:Employee motivational drivers.Gen Y workforce attitudes (1).          The opportunity: Gen...
Attracting International Talent:Employee motivational drivers.Gen Y workforce attitudes (2).           Generation Y values...
Attracting International Talent:CSW`s Business Case [1].                                   8
Attracting International Talent:CSW`s Business Case [2].                                   9
Attracting International Talent:CSW`s Business Case [3].                                   10
Attracting International Talent:CSW`s Business Case [4].                                   11
Attracting International Talent:CSW`s Business Case [3].                                   12
Attracting International Talent:CSW`s Lessons Learned: How can we take a strategic lead? (1)Lessons Learned (strategic lev...
Attracting International Talent:CSW`s Lessons Learned: How can we take a strategic lead? (2) Lessons Learned (tactical lev...
Attracting International Talent:How can we take a strategic lead?Lessons Learned (operational level).1.Getting Internation...
Contacts@ Critical Software, SA: joao.v.coelho@criticalsoftware.com@ Linkedin: http://pt.linkedin.com/in/joaovascocoelho@ ...
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Attracting international talent_Oct012

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  • I-O psychologists use their training and knowledge of psychological principles in a wide variety of settings. For instance, psychometrics and statistics are used in selecting/hiring employees; learning principles are used in training and motivation; and numerous social psychological concepts come into play when I-O psychologists work in the areas of leadership and job satisfaction. Although I-O psychologists are not lawyers, they often provide consultation to employers in legal matters. Hiring, salary, and promotion practices must follow legal guidelines. A large proportion of I-O psychologists help to develop selection systems. These systems include: 1) identifying the knowledge, skills, abilities, and other qualities that are necessary to perform well, a process called job analysis, 2) identifying and/or designing tests and measures to assess applicants’ levels on those key job requirements, 3) administering the tests, and 4) determining the applicants most suitable for a given position. Ensuring that this process is accurate and fair and doesn’t discriminate against members of protected groups is a key job task of many I-O psychologists. I-O psychologists also design and provide training to employees to ensure that they can perform well on the key job requirements outlined in a job analysis. This requires identifying training needs, determining the most effective training approach, and often conducting the training. The diversity of education levels, languages, and ages of employees influence each step of the training process. In addition to selection and training, I-O psychologists help in designing systems to determine if employees are performing satisfactorily. Again, the key job requirements are the source for the performance appraisal system.
  • I-O psychologists use their training and knowledge of psychological principles in a wide variety of settings. For instance, psychometrics and statistics are used in selecting/hiring employees; learning principles are used in training and motivation; and numerous social psychological concepts come into play when I-O psychologists work in the areas of leadership and job satisfaction. Although I-O psychologists are not lawyers, they often provide consultation to employers in legal matters. Hiring, salary, and promotion practices must follow legal guidelines. A large proportion of I-O psychologists help to develop selection systems. These systems include: 1) identifying the knowledge, skills, abilities, and other qualities that are necessary to perform well, a process called job analysis, 2) identifying and/or designing tests and measures to assess applicants’ levels on those key job requirements, 3) administering the tests, and 4) determining the applicants most suitable for a given position. Ensuring that this process is accurate and fair and doesn’t discriminate against members of protected groups is a key job task of many I-O psychologists. I-O psychologists also design and provide training to employees to ensure that they can perform well on the key job requirements outlined in a job analysis. This requires identifying training needs, determining the most effective training approach, and often conducting the training. The diversity of education levels, languages, and ages of employees influence each step of the training process. In addition to selection and training, I-O psychologists help in designing systems to determine if employees are performing satisfactorily. Again, the key job requirements are the source for the performance appraisal system.
  • I-O psychologists use their training and knowledge of psychological principles in a wide variety of settings. For instance, psychometrics and statistics are used in selecting/hiring employees; learning principles are used in training and motivation; and numerous social psychological concepts come into play when I-O psychologists work in the areas of leadership and job satisfaction. Although I-O psychologists are not lawyers, they often provide consultation to employers in legal matters. Hiring, salary, and promotion practices must follow legal guidelines. A large proportion of I-O psychologists help to develop selection systems. These systems include: 1) identifying the knowledge, skills, abilities, and other qualities that are necessary to perform well, a process called job analysis, 2) identifying and/or designing tests and measures to assess applicants’ levels on those key job requirements, 3) administering the tests, and 4) determining the applicants most suitable for a given position. Ensuring that this process is accurate and fair and doesn’t discriminate against members of protected groups is a key job task of many I-O psychologists. I-O psychologists also design and provide training to employees to ensure that they can perform well on the key job requirements outlined in a job analysis. This requires identifying training needs, determining the most effective training approach, and often conducting the training. The diversity of education levels, languages, and ages of employees influence each step of the training process. In addition to selection and training, I-O psychologists help in designing systems to determine if employees are performing satisfactorily. Again, the key job requirements are the source for the performance appraisal system.
  • I-O psychologists use their training and knowledge of psychological principles in a wide variety of settings. For instance, psychometrics and statistics are used in selecting/hiring employees; learning principles are used in training and motivation; and numerous social psychological concepts come into play when I-O psychologists work in the areas of leadership and job satisfaction. Although I-O psychologists are not lawyers, they often provide consultation to employers in legal matters. Hiring, salary, and promotion practices must follow legal guidelines. A large proportion of I-O psychologists help to develop selection systems. These systems include: 1) identifying the knowledge, skills, abilities, and other qualities that are necessary to perform well, a process called job analysis, 2) identifying and/or designing tests and measures to assess applicants’ levels on those key job requirements, 3) administering the tests, and 4) determining the applicants most suitable for a given position. Ensuring that this process is accurate and fair and doesn’t discriminate against members of protected groups is a key job task of many I-O psychologists. I-O psychologists also design and provide training to employees to ensure that they can perform well on the key job requirements outlined in a job analysis. This requires identifying training needs, determining the most effective training approach, and often conducting the training. The diversity of education levels, languages, and ages of employees influence each step of the training process. In addition to selection and training, I-O psychologists help in designing systems to determine if employees are performing satisfactorily. Again, the key job requirements are the source for the performance appraisal system.
  • I-O psychologists use their training and knowledge of psychological principles in a wide variety of settings. For instance, psychometrics and statistics are used in selecting/hiring employees; learning principles are used in training and motivation; and numerous social psychological concepts come into play when I-O psychologists work in the areas of leadership and job satisfaction. Although I-O psychologists are not lawyers, they often provide consultation to employers in legal matters. Hiring, salary, and promotion practices must follow legal guidelines. A large proportion of I-O psychologists help to develop selection systems. These systems include: 1) identifying the knowledge, skills, abilities, and other qualities that are necessary to perform well, a process called job analysis, 2) identifying and/or designing tests and measures to assess applicants’ levels on those key job requirements, 3) administering the tests, and 4) determining the applicants most suitable for a given position. Ensuring that this process is accurate and fair and doesn’t discriminate against members of protected groups is a key job task of many I-O psychologists. I-O psychologists also design and provide training to employees to ensure that they can perform well on the key job requirements outlined in a job analysis. This requires identifying training needs, determining the most effective training approach, and often conducting the training. The diversity of education levels, languages, and ages of employees influence each step of the training process. In addition to selection and training, I-O psychologists help in designing systems to determine if employees are performing satisfactorily. Again, the key job requirements are the source for the performance appraisal system.
  • I-O psychologists use their training and knowledge of psychological principles in a wide variety of settings. For instance, psychometrics and statistics are used in selecting/hiring employees; learning principles are used in training and motivation; and numerous social psychological concepts come into play when I-O psychologists work in the areas of leadership and job satisfaction. Although I-O psychologists are not lawyers, they often provide consultation to employers in legal matters. Hiring, salary, and promotion practices must follow legal guidelines. A large proportion of I-O psychologists help to develop selection systems. These systems include: 1) identifying the knowledge, skills, abilities, and other qualities that are necessary to perform well, a process called job analysis, 2) identifying and/or designing tests and measures to assess applicants’ levels on those key job requirements, 3) administering the tests, and 4) determining the applicants most suitable for a given position. Ensuring that this process is accurate and fair and doesn’t discriminate against members of protected groups is a key job task of many I-O psychologists. I-O psychologists also design and provide training to employees to ensure that they can perform well on the key job requirements outlined in a job analysis. This requires identifying training needs, determining the most effective training approach, and often conducting the training. The diversity of education levels, languages, and ages of employees influence each step of the training process. In addition to selection and training, I-O psychologists help in designing systems to determine if employees are performing satisfactorily. Again, the key job requirements are the source for the performance appraisal system.
  • I-O psychologists use their training and knowledge of psychological principles in a wide variety of settings. For instance, psychometrics and statistics are used in selecting/hiring employees; learning principles are used in training and motivation; and numerous social psychological concepts come into play when I-O psychologists work in the areas of leadership and job satisfaction. Although I-O psychologists are not lawyers, they often provide consultation to employers in legal matters. Hiring, salary, and promotion practices must follow legal guidelines. A large proportion of I-O psychologists help to develop selection systems. These systems include: 1) identifying the knowledge, skills, abilities, and other qualities that are necessary to perform well, a process called job analysis, 2) identifying and/or designing tests and measures to assess applicants’ levels on those key job requirements, 3) administering the tests, and 4) determining the applicants most suitable for a given position. Ensuring that this process is accurate and fair and doesn’t discriminate against members of protected groups is a key job task of many I-O psychologists. I-O psychologists also design and provide training to employees to ensure that they can perform well on the key job requirements outlined in a job analysis. This requires identifying training needs, determining the most effective training approach, and often conducting the training. The diversity of education levels, languages, and ages of employees influence each step of the training process. In addition to selection and training, I-O psychologists help in designing systems to determine if employees are performing satisfactorily. Again, the key job requirements are the source for the performance appraisal system.
  • I-O psychologists use their training and knowledge of psychological principles in a wide variety of settings. For instance, psychometrics and statistics are used in selecting/hiring employees; learning principles are used in training and motivation; and numerous social psychological concepts come into play when I-O psychologists work in the areas of leadership and job satisfaction. Although I-O psychologists are not lawyers, they often provide consultation to employers in legal matters. Hiring, salary, and promotion practices must follow legal guidelines. A large proportion of I-O psychologists help to develop selection systems. These systems include: 1) identifying the knowledge, skills, abilities, and other qualities that are necessary to perform well, a process called job analysis, 2) identifying and/or designing tests and measures to assess applicants’ levels on those key job requirements, 3) administering the tests, and 4) determining the applicants most suitable for a given position. Ensuring that this process is accurate and fair and doesn’t discriminate against members of protected groups is a key job task of many I-O psychologists. I-O psychologists also design and provide training to employees to ensure that they can perform well on the key job requirements outlined in a job analysis. This requires identifying training needs, determining the most effective training approach, and often conducting the training. The diversity of education levels, languages, and ages of employees influence each step of the training process. In addition to selection and training, I-O psychologists help in designing systems to determine if employees are performing satisfactorily. Again, the key job requirements are the source for the performance appraisal system.
  • I-O psychologists use their training and knowledge of psychological principles in a wide variety of settings. For instance, psychometrics and statistics are used in selecting/hiring employees; learning principles are used in training and motivation; and numerous social psychological concepts come into play when I-O psychologists work in the areas of leadership and job satisfaction. Although I-O psychologists are not lawyers, they often provide consultation to employers in legal matters. Hiring, salary, and promotion practices must follow legal guidelines. A large proportion of I-O psychologists help to develop selection systems. These systems include: 1) identifying the knowledge, skills, abilities, and other qualities that are necessary to perform well, a process called job analysis, 2) identifying and/or designing tests and measures to assess applicants’ levels on those key job requirements, 3) administering the tests, and 4) determining the applicants most suitable for a given position. Ensuring that this process is accurate and fair and doesn’t discriminate against members of protected groups is a key job task of many I-O psychologists. I-O psychologists also design and provide training to employees to ensure that they can perform well on the key job requirements outlined in a job analysis. This requires identifying training needs, determining the most effective training approach, and often conducting the training. The diversity of education levels, languages, and ages of employees influence each step of the training process. In addition to selection and training, I-O psychologists help in designing systems to determine if employees are performing satisfactorily. Again, the key job requirements are the source for the performance appraisal system.
  • I-O psychologists use their training and knowledge of psychological principles in a wide variety of settings. For instance, psychometrics and statistics are used in selecting/hiring employees; learning principles are used in training and motivation; and numerous social psychological concepts come into play when I-O psychologists work in the areas of leadership and job satisfaction. Although I-O psychologists are not lawyers, they often provide consultation to employers in legal matters. Hiring, salary, and promotion practices must follow legal guidelines. A large proportion of I-O psychologists help to develop selection systems. These systems include: 1) identifying the knowledge, skills, abilities, and other qualities that are necessary to perform well, a process called job analysis, 2) identifying and/or designing tests and measures to assess applicants’ levels on those key job requirements, 3) administering the tests, and 4) determining the applicants most suitable for a given position. Ensuring that this process is accurate and fair and doesn’t discriminate against members of protected groups is a key job task of many I-O psychologists. I-O psychologists also design and provide training to employees to ensure that they can perform well on the key job requirements outlined in a job analysis. This requires identifying training needs, determining the most effective training approach, and often conducting the training. The diversity of education levels, languages, and ages of employees influence each step of the training process. In addition to selection and training, I-O psychologists help in designing systems to determine if employees are performing satisfactorily. Again, the key job requirements are the source for the performance appraisal system.
  • I-O psychologists use their training and knowledge of psychological principles in a wide variety of settings. For instance, psychometrics and statistics are used in selecting/hiring employees; learning principles are used in training and motivation; and numerous social psychological concepts come into play when I-O psychologists work in the areas of leadership and job satisfaction. Although I-O psychologists are not lawyers, they often provide consultation to employers in legal matters. Hiring, salary, and promotion practices must follow legal guidelines. A large proportion of I-O psychologists help to develop selection systems. These systems include: 1) identifying the knowledge, skills, abilities, and other qualities that are necessary to perform well, a process called job analysis, 2) identifying and/or designing tests and measures to assess applicants’ levels on those key job requirements, 3) administering the tests, and 4) determining the applicants most suitable for a given position. Ensuring that this process is accurate and fair and doesn’t discriminate against members of protected groups is a key job task of many I-O psychologists. I-O psychologists also design and provide training to employees to ensure that they can perform well on the key job requirements outlined in a job analysis. This requires identifying training needs, determining the most effective training approach, and often conducting the training. The diversity of education levels, languages, and ages of employees influence each step of the training process. In addition to selection and training, I-O psychologists help in designing systems to determine if employees are performing satisfactorily. Again, the key job requirements are the source for the performance appraisal system.
  • I-O psychologists use their training and knowledge of psychological principles in a wide variety of settings. For instance, psychometrics and statistics are used in selecting/hiring employees; learning principles are used in training and motivation; and numerous social psychological concepts come into play when I-O psychologists work in the areas of leadership and job satisfaction. Although I-O psychologists are not lawyers, they often provide consultation to employers in legal matters. Hiring, salary, and promotion practices must follow legal guidelines. A large proportion of I-O psychologists help to develop selection systems. These systems include: 1) identifying the knowledge, skills, abilities, and other qualities that are necessary to perform well, a process called job analysis, 2) identifying and/or designing tests and measures to assess applicants’ levels on those key job requirements, 3) administering the tests, and 4) determining the applicants most suitable for a given position. Ensuring that this process is accurate and fair and doesn’t discriminate against members of protected groups is a key job task of many I-O psychologists. I-O psychologists also design and provide training to employees to ensure that they can perform well on the key job requirements outlined in a job analysis. This requires identifying training needs, determining the most effective training approach, and often conducting the training. The diversity of education levels, languages, and ages of employees influence each step of the training process. In addition to selection and training, I-O psychologists help in designing systems to determine if employees are performing satisfactorily. Again, the key job requirements are the source for the performance appraisal system.
  • I-O psychologists use their training and knowledge of psychological principles in a wide variety of settings. For instance, psychometrics and statistics are used in selecting/hiring employees; learning principles are used in training and motivation; and numerous social psychological concepts come into play when I-O psychologists work in the areas of leadership and job satisfaction. Although I-O psychologists are not lawyers, they often provide consultation to employers in legal matters. Hiring, salary, and promotion practices must follow legal guidelines. A large proportion of I-O psychologists help to develop selection systems. These systems include: 1) identifying the knowledge, skills, abilities, and other qualities that are necessary to perform well, a process called job analysis, 2) identifying and/or designing tests and measures to assess applicants’ levels on those key job requirements, 3) administering the tests, and 4) determining the applicants most suitable for a given position. Ensuring that this process is accurate and fair and doesn’t discriminate against members of protected groups is a key job task of many I-O psychologists. I-O psychologists also design and provide training to employees to ensure that they can perform well on the key job requirements outlined in a job analysis. This requires identifying training needs, determining the most effective training approach, and often conducting the training. The diversity of education levels, languages, and ages of employees influence each step of the training process. In addition to selection and training, I-O psychologists help in designing systems to determine if employees are performing satisfactorily. Again, the key job requirements are the source for the performance appraisal system.
  • I-O psychologists use their training and knowledge of psychological principles in a wide variety of settings. For instance, psychometrics and statistics are used in selecting/hiring employees; learning principles are used in training and motivation; and numerous social psychological concepts come into play when I-O psychologists work in the areas of leadership and job satisfaction. Although I-O psychologists are not lawyers, they often provide consultation to employers in legal matters. Hiring, salary, and promotion practices must follow legal guidelines. A large proportion of I-O psychologists help to develop selection systems. These systems include: 1) identifying the knowledge, skills, abilities, and other qualities that are necessary to perform well, a process called job analysis, 2) identifying and/or designing tests and measures to assess applicants’ levels on those key job requirements, 3) administering the tests, and 4) determining the applicants most suitable for a given position. Ensuring that this process is accurate and fair and doesn’t discriminate against members of protected groups is a key job task of many I-O psychologists. I-O psychologists also design and provide training to employees to ensure that they can perform well on the key job requirements outlined in a job analysis. This requires identifying training needs, determining the most effective training approach, and often conducting the training. The diversity of education levels, languages, and ages of employees influence each step of the training process. In addition to selection and training, I-O psychologists help in designing systems to determine if employees are performing satisfactorily. Again, the key job requirements are the source for the performance appraisal system.
  • Sum-up: In short, the findings of the study indicate that there is a significant difference in the perceived usefulness of a certification, if an employee participates or not in a dedicated certification program. This difference is more significant in more senior, management-related roles, as for junior engineers that don’t participate in a certification program, this participation isn`t seen as a professional development anchor or a valid education driver.
  • Transcript of "Attracting international talent_Oct012"

    1. 1. Attracting International Talent:CSW`s Lessons Learned: How can we take a strategic lead? 2012 João Vasco Coelho (CSW // CIES/ISCTE) [joao.v.coelho@criticalsoftware.com]
    2. 2. Attracting International Talent:CSW`s Lessons Learned: How can we take a strategic lead?Contents.. Trends in international migration (OECD).. Labour market trends.. Employee motivational drivers.. CSW`s Business Case.. CSW`s Lessons Learned: How can we take a strategic lead? 2012 João Vasco Coelho (CSW // CIES/ISCTE) [joao.v.coelho@criticalsoftware.com] 2
    3. 3. Attracting International Talent:Trends in International Migration (OECD).International Migration is a trend. New migrants represented in 2011 15% of entries into strongly growing occupationsin Europe over the decade and 22% in the US (OECD, 2012). OECD countries foreign-born population ( total population) [Source: OECD, 2011] 3
    4. 4. Attracting International Talent:Labour Market Trends.Occupational change (EU). In european countries, engineering science professionals had a 50% rate of averagegrowth for 2000-2010: EU countries growing occupations (%; 2000-2010) [Source: OECD, 2012] 4
    5. 5. Attracting International Talent:Labour Market Trends.Labour Market Segmentation (EU) -» a R&S challenge. 50% low-skilled jobs on average are taken up by immigrants. Only in Hungary, Luxembourg and Switzerland is possible to find more recentmigrants in highly skilled jobs. Distribution of occupational skills of workers entering jobs, by skill level (%; 2000-2010) [Source: OECD, 2012] 5
    6. 6. Attracting International Talent:Employee motivational drivers.Gen Y workforce attitudes (1). The opportunity: Gen Y is more eager to contribute and take on responsibility earlier in their careers than prior generations. The challenge: Most traditional organizations are not set up to recognize talent pool. If Gen Yers don’t have opportunities, they’re likely to move on in search of growth. Characteristics of the iconic generations [Source: Deloitte, 2012] 6
    7. 7. Attracting International Talent:Employee motivational drivers.Gen Y workforce attitudes (2). Generation Y values opportunity over job security. Gen Y key enablers [Source: Deloitte “Generation Y: Powerhouse of the global economy” report, 2012] 7
    8. 8. Attracting International Talent:CSW`s Business Case [1]. 8
    9. 9. Attracting International Talent:CSW`s Business Case [2]. 9
    10. 10. Attracting International Talent:CSW`s Business Case [3]. 10
    11. 11. Attracting International Talent:CSW`s Business Case [4]. 11
    12. 12. Attracting International Talent:CSW`s Business Case [3]. 12
    13. 13. Attracting International Talent:CSW`s Lessons Learned: How can we take a strategic lead? (1)Lessons Learned (strategic level).1. Corporate institutional strategy for international engagement.Increases the intensity of international activities, makes them more central to the corporate missionand culture. Raise international brand profile at sector and institutional level (e.g., CSW has offices in8 countries, across the globe).2. Localized talent.Talent localized as a HR strategy, adapted to the needs of cultural differences in different countries,reduces economic costs. Use of local specialists to engage expat staff. Train local workers (e.g.,ITGrow Academy in Mozambique).3. Strong institutional relationships and partnerships with a limited number ofstrategically relevant universities, governments, and R&S service companies.A base for building a global network of collaborators that provide access, information, and sources fortalented students and faculty. Maintaining links with international alumni (R&D projects, PhDs, MBAs,Summer and short-term internships as possible drivers). Joint appointments with internationalinstitutions (e.g., R&D international consortiums as drivers for talent spotting and network) (e.g., MarieCurie programs; Consórcio OPEras - Agencia Nacional PROALV; AICEP programs, Praktikum). 13
    14. 14. Attracting International Talent:CSW`s Lessons Learned: How can we take a strategic lead? (2) Lessons Learned (tactical level). 1.Internal Communication. Create an internal extensive workers`network to support international activities and create bonds that help institutional and individual success. Maintaining long term links with staff in mobility projects (e.g., “refer a friend” policy; open-door policy). 2. HR Management Integrated Policy. More active staff exchange, integrated with career management policy. “Brain circulation” builds networks, linkages for knowledge – but absorptive capacity and integration with career management policy is essential (e.g., CSW`s International Mobility Policy yearly revisions). 3. Brand awareness. Culturally appropriate and targeted to particular countries and communities of high priority. Clear employee value propositions for foreign candidates (e.g., CSW`s EVP statement -» 5 key value drivers) 4. Social media. Develop a strategic policy platform that enables HR R&S operations and collaboration on a global scale (e.g., Linkedin distributed use between line managers and HR team members). 14
    15. 15. Attracting International Talent:How can we take a strategic lead?Lessons Learned (operational level).1.Getting International Recruiting Right.a)Geographical differences – perceived ones – work against a “perfect market” forinternational talent (it is difficult to attract talent to small countries that are at the margins ofeconomic power or cutting-edge technology, or even to “marginal” cities in economic andtechnological powerhouses);b)Communicate clearly the value drivers of the professional opportunity (explore what thecandidate is likely to learn in the position and how the opportunity can transform his or hercareer);c)Be flexible about corporate culture (consider possible local variations)d)Be prepared to offset real drawbacks (consider tax filling support advisors; local educationsupport package or children; spouse career assistance in the new location).e)Facilitate visits or multiple contacts by the candidate before hiring.f)Help mitigate up front the difficulties of re-entry (e.g., mentoring when the mobility projectends). 2012 João Vasco Coelho (CSW // CIES/ISCTE) [joao.v.coelho@criticalsoftware.com] 15
    16. 16. Contacts@ Critical Software, SA: joao.v.coelho@criticalsoftware.com@ Linkedin: http://pt.linkedin.com/in/joaovascocoelho@ CIES/ISCTE: vasco.jcoelho@gmail.com 2012 João Vasco Coelho (CSW // CIES/ISCTE) [joao.v.coelho@criticalsoftware.com] 16
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