The Fashion Design Cluster in Milan, Italy

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  • Patricia As the world ’s 11 th largest economy , Italy is regarded as a high-income country . A peninsula in the Mediterranean Sea covering 301,338 km 2 , Italy currently has a population of over 60.6 million people . While Italy lacks natural resources for industrial use, it benefits from natural endowments such as geography, terrain, climate, and history. Geographically, Italy is part of the Eurasian continent neighboring with France, Switzerland, Austria, and Slovenia . Its diverse terrain and moderate central climate , from the Mountainous Alpes, to the Islands of Elba, Sardinia, and Sicily make it ideal for leisure and agricultural activities. In addition, Italy ’s preservation of rich history still includes reminisce of the Roman Empire spread throughout the country.
  • 1861 constitutional monarchy with a parliament elected under limited suffrage . Following, the northern regions of the new nation quickly adopted the developing industrialization of the early 1900s, while the densely populated south lagged behind. Only wealthy citizens were allowed to vote, leading to an unequal representation between Northern and Southern Italy 1920s & 1930s limited personal liberties, strong government intervention, and an end to multi-party politics
  • 1992 put a stop to Italy ’s over dependence on a continuous devaluation of the lira, high inflation, and high budget deficit. A new accountability to the European Central Bank, forced Italy to rethink its entire economic model, reduce inflation, and fix its exchange rates. Two crucial macroeconomic factors that presently inhibit Italy ’s economic growth, are its outstanding levels of corruption and organized crime. In the 2011 Perceived Corruption Index, with 0 representing “highly corrupt” and 9 representing “very clean,” Italy received a grade of 3.9. While the index marks perception rather than actual levels of corruption, this represents a hindrance to building investor confidence in the nation (figure 10) and consequently a lack of Foreign Direct Investment compared with its EU counterparts.   That being said, between 2010 and 2011 Italy still managed to move up five places to 43 rd on the global competitiveness ranking 9 . Italy ’s impressive market size enables it to take advantage of large economies of scale, coupled with its production of high value-added goods, makes it the 2 nd best business cluster in the world 8 . Transparency International – Corruptions Perception Index 2011
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  • The Fashion Design Cluster in Milan, Italy

    1. 1. THE FASHION DESIGNCLUSTER IN MILAN, ITALYLudovica ConsumanoJo PatroniPatricia SchmiedigenMichelangelo Secchi
    2. 2. COUNTRY PROFILE: NATURALENDOWMENTS Italy World’s 11th largest economy Population: 60.6 million Natural Endowments: • Geography • Terrain • Climate • History
    3. 3. COUNTRY PROFILE: HISTORICAL
    4. 4. COUNTRY PROFILE: ECONOMICPERFORMANCE GDP by Region (Italy) 2008 GDP per capita (PPP) Present Value: 2010 31555 USD Historical High: 2008 33268.85 USD Historical Low: 1980 9209.67 USD
    5. 5. ITALY NATIONAL COMPETITIVENESS:THE NATIONAL DIAMOND
    6. 6. ITALY NATIONAL COMPETITIVENESS:THE NATIONAL DIAMOND
    7. 7. ITALY NATIONAL COMPETITIVENESS:THE NATIONAL DIAMOND
    8. 8. ITALY NATIONAL COMPETITIVENESS:THE NATIONAL DIAMOND
    9. 9. ITALY NATIONAL COMPETITIVENESS:THE NATIONAL DIAMOND
    10. 10. CLUSTER ANALYSIS: HISTORICALFASHION IN ITALY (BEFORE 1970) Late XXVIII - Apparel/Textile Sector at dawn of Industrialization of Italy: first concentrations around smaller town in Northern Italy 1860 - Specialization and technological advancement after Italy unification First fair ground opened in Milan in 1906 Beginning XX – First Haute couture Fashion Houses and related Boutiques (Prada 1913, Gucci 1921) 30’s - Autarchy and sanctions during the Fascism After WWII Economic Boom involved Fashion System in a strong growth 50’s-60’s - Changes in consumptions patterns: differentiation of styles, consumerism.
    11. 11. CLUSTER ANALYSIS: HISTORICALBIRTH OF MILAN FASHION CLUSTER (1970S &1990S) Manufacture process reorganized through specialized districts. Textile/apparel districts in Lombardy. New relation between Design and Manufacture Birth of «Stilismo»: new Fashion House established in Milan. Armani (1975), Versace (1978), Moschino (1983), D&G (1986). Run-ways tradition started in Milan in 1975 (Albini) Growth of specialized fashion fair system Creation of Showcase districts led by new boutiques like Fiorucci (1967) Moschino (1989), Krizia (1984) Milano Capital of Fashion and the International Competition )(analysis of export trends
    12. 12. MILAN FASHION DESIGN CLUSTER MAP Finance Events&Fairs MediaBanks Financial Model Run ways Cinema Television Services Agencies events Specialized Web Exposition Interior Press spaces Design Manifacturing Communication Agencies Fibers Textiles Marketing&Promotion Tourism Notions Fashion Local Hotels Long Distance Transport Apparel Design Retail Local Leather Transport Restaurant Distribution Jewels Travel Agencies Accessories Institutions for Collaborations Retail District Government Fashion Associations National Education&Training Municipality National Development Chamber c GovernmentUniversities c Professional Agencies Related Region Training EU Industry Commercial associations Chambers
    13. 13. CLUSTER ANALYSIS: EXPORTITALY FASHION SYSTEM
    14. 14. CLUSTER ANALYSIS:GLOBAL CHALLENGES (1990S &2000S) trends after 95 Export Competitiveness on Manufacure basis (textile and fibers) from new developing economies Shift on creativity cluster Growth of education supply Retail power and new attractiveness for international brands. FDI The challenges after 2008
    15. 15. MILAN FASHION DESIGN CLUSTER:THE DIAMOND
    16. 16. MILAN FASHION DESIGN CLUSTER:THE DIAMOND GOVERNME NT- Milan City Administration, Assessor for fashion and design;-Lombardy Region: fashion start-up project financing;- Memorandum of Understanding with French Federation forCulture;- Directive 2008/121/EC on textile labelling;- Agreement with the Chamber of Chinese Fashion;- Agreement with Association of Spanish Fashion Creators;
    17. 17. MILAN FASHION DESIGN CLUSTER:THE DIAMOND FACTOR CONDITIONS -Made in Italy concept; -Milan as financial heart and editor heart of Italy; -City-web structure; -Specialized industrial design firms; -Advantageous infrastructure system; DEMAND CONDITIONS -Exports; -Sophisticated domestic demand; -Foreign buyers;
    18. 18. MILAN FASHION DESIGN CLUSTER:THE DIAMOND CONTEXT FOR FIRMS STRATEGY AND RIVALRY
    19. 19. MILAN FASHION DESIGN CLUSTER:THE DIAMOND SUPPORTING INDUSTRIES -Media Industries (TV producers, Magazine editors, Press office, Billboard space providers, Publishing, Printing); -Education (fashion academies, research institutes); -Sales outlets; -Interior design industries (furniture); -Entertainment Industries (Clubs); -Event Organization companies (Showrooms, PR agency, Model agencies, Trainers); -Facilities (Hotel, Restaurant, Travel agencies);
    20. 20. MILAN FASHION DESIGN CLUSTER:THE DIAMOND INSTITUTIONS FOR COLLABORATION - National Chamber of Italian Fashion; -Milan Chamber of Commerce (Promos); -Fiera Milano; -Fashion Museum; -Italian Fashion System; -Via Montenapoleone Association; -Unione Confcommercio; -Federmoda; -Altagamma Foundation; -Chamber of Italian Fashion Buyer; -Trade Fashion Fairs (Anteprima, Milano Unica, Mi-Milano Pret a Porter, Micam); -Fédération Française de la Couture, du Pret-à-Porter des Couturiers et des Créateurs de Mode;

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