Faculty Learning Community Perspectives on Blended Course Development
10th Annual SloanConsortium Blended LearningConferen...
What is the role of ‘community’ in
the design of blended learning?
#blended27063 #blend 13 @sloancblended
FLC One:
Collaborative course development and
feedback while implementing.
FLCTwo:
Create a useful online resource for tho...
What new pedagogies
are required for blended
course design?
What are the effects of
blended learning on
faculty teaching l...
Showcase the:
 impact of PD from faculty perspective
 support while engaging in a FLC
 variety of design approaches
 w...
Impact
Learning / Application
Campus-Wide Innovation
Support
F2F Meetings
Portal - Sharing
Emails/Communication
Blended Ap...
Weekly instructor videos
Blackboard
Individualized study
Blackboard and other resources of
choice
Building group project
p...
Impact
Core course for unit
Support
Emails/Communication
Blended Approach
Asynchronous Online
Blackboard
SoftChalk tutoria...
Impact
More than Blackboard
Satellite program
Support
Sustained engagement
Faculty flexibility
Program growth
Blended Appr...
Impact
More than Blackboard
Satellite program
Support
Sustained engagement
Faculty flexibility
Program growth
Blended Appr...
Impact
More than Blackboard
Satellite program
Support
Sustained engagement
Faculty flexibility
Program growth
Blended Appr...
Impact
More than Blackboard
Satellite program
Support
Sustained engagement
Faculty flexibility
Program growth
Blended Appr...
Impact
More than Blackboard
Satellite program
Support
Sustained engagement
Faculty flexibility
Program growth
Blended Appr...
Impact
More than Blackboard
Satellite program
Support
Sustained engagement
Faculty flexibility
Program growth
Blended Appr...
Impact
• Campus-wide
innovation
Support
• Network of
educator/learners
Blended Approach
• Asynchronous
online
supplementat...
Source: Blended Learning Model Definitions
(Clayton Christensen Institute, 2013)
http://www.christenseninstitute.org/blend...
Business
Marketing
Cinema
and
Language
Elementary
Teacher
Education
What is the role of ‘community’ in
the design of blended learning?
wp.vcu.edu/blendedlearningflc
From the CTE:
Dr. Joyce Kincannon,Online Instructional Designer
jmkincannon@vcu.edu (804) 828-1605
BrittWattwood. Senior F...
FLCDirectVCU_sloan_cblended2013
FLCDirectVCU_sloan_cblended2013
FLCDirectVCU_sloan_cblended2013
FLCDirectVCU_sloan_cblended2013
FLCDirectVCU_sloan_cblended2013
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  • Focus: Teaching effectiveness and student learning through faculty developmentCommunity of teacher-scholarsLeadership in discussion, development, and implementationAttention to varied perspectives/multidisciplinaryGrounded in learning theory, supportive of varying degrees of “blending”
  • Small GrantsNew Faculty OrientationOnline Course Development InitiativePreparing to Teach OnlineMentorship GroupEd Tech CollectiveLearning PathsOnline Learning SummitBrown Bag Lunch SeriesFaculty Learning Communities
  • Driving Question – How can I best facilitate the group learning experience in an asynchronous online environment WITH learners that have a wide range of proficiency using technology toolsDecision-making process – teacher as learner, content, 3 sessions into 8 weeks (without overload), KISS, mentoring, reviewing/testing with othersCourse components:Google-based collaboration (3 ways)Self, peer, instructor feedbackWeekly reflectionEvolving group project portfolio
  • BBSuggested weekly scheduleWeekly videos from instructorTutorials / formative assessmentGoogleIndividualized studyFormative assessmentExtension links / resource documentsStudent response – 2 pilot cohorts, one that starts with F2F (first), one that does not / seeking a pilot ‘lurker’
  • Driving Question – Provide means for interacting with peers and instructor but also with content, beyond reading and listeningDecision-making process – Started with concept of flipped classroom then added elements around it for more learner engagementCourse format – Met face-to-face 1 day a week (50% of scheduled class time)
  • Course components:Blackboard course site: Suggested weekly schedule, some flexibility within the week, weekly online quizzesTextbook, supplemental readings, videos as case studiesDiscussion forums used to explore and apply concepts learned
  • Course components:Online tutorials:multimedia as advance organizer for main conceptsinstructor video intronarrated presentationsformative assessmentsflashcard appblog feed with topics related to content of unit
  • [example of unit opener]Face to face: Individual presentations and group reports, Student response – positive reception to tutorials and forums; desire for more time face-to-face for discussion
  • Explain BRIEFLY what we do and how we operate (Center for Sport Leadership)Masters only12 month program1 class per week (5 classes per semester)Students have to have an assistantship in sport (20 hours per week)VERY much focused on practicality (Hands-on learning)Students want to be athletic directors, front office management, and/or coachesMy initial proposal was to answer this question… How can I further incorporate online components to my face-to-face classes?
  • Specifically, I want to emphasize the “P” (preparation) in the PIE model. The above picture is of Rhubarb pie. My favorite and native to Western Wisconsin. I wanted my students to be engaged over the entire week not just the few hours before class and during class. How can I keep them actively engaged? Through what portal can I do this beyond Blackboard?
  • Well…. Things changed. My chair wanted me to focus on starting a satellite campus (international or domestic) where we would combine a face-to-face format with online components. Thus, my charge changed from a course level focus to program development. The premise behind the satellite format was to export our current model to a different locale with as little overhead and new hiring as possible. Our current faculty would travel once or twice per semester to teach face-to-face. The rest of the meeting would occur online through Wimba or Collaborate.
  • Well, then my boss quit in Mid-October. That is me. Notice the hair.
  • Instead of going back to the drawing board, I went forward with the satellite proposal. I got to work with Joyce’s happy students and they helped me tackle the issues of starting a satellite campus. I was provided three unique proposals, and had some great conversations with my colleagues as we discussed future possibilities, growth, and the realizations associated with a satellite campus.
  • In the end, our Dean was somewhat supportive, yet wants us to wait until we hire a new Director before we move forward. Thus, we are still in a holding pattern. However, I evolved through the process and the CTE continues to be an excellent resource/sounding board/etcetc etc. I am not sure if I am program-level thinker as it relates to educational policy, but I am sure I now understand how hard it is.
  • 1. Blended listening course increases the amount of time learners spend processing and using the target language. Benefits: Self-paced (with some limits) yielding improved comprehension F2F meetings can focus on “mechanics” of note-taking, study skills, discrete and blended critical thinking skills (with concomitant discourse structures)“Course in a box” Last-minute course assignments are common practice in Intensive English Programs. These preclude the preparation typical in other, academic courses. Benefits: Using a familiar platform, Blackboard, instructors have the course content they will need and also the ability to adapt the content to the particular needs of the students in their section. More administrative options in scheduling classes.3. Important lesson learned: Base online component on curriculum so that it is independent of course text which can change.
  • Rotation model: rotate among modalities, at least one of which is online learningClassroom (station) rotation: rotate on a fixed schedule among learning modalitiesLab rotation: rotate on a fixed schedules among locations at VCUFlipped classroom: repurposing time: individual inquiry and collaboration in class (invite speakers)Individual rotation: rotation schedule individualizedA La Carte model (Self Blend model)More online learning than in rotation modelone or more topics entirely online (at the same time continue to have bricks and mortar educational experiencesEnriched Virtual Program More online learning than in either Rotation Model or A La CarteModel whole course experience (not topic by topic approach)Source: Modified from Blended Learning Model Definitions (Clayton Christensen Institute, 2013)
  • FLCDirectVCU_sloan_cblended2013

    1. 1. Faculty Learning Community Perspectives on Blended Course Development 10th Annual SloanConsortium Blended LearningConference &Workshop July 8-9, 2013
    2. 2. What is the role of ‘community’ in the design of blended learning? #blended27063 #blend 13 @sloancblended
    3. 3. FLC One: Collaborative course development and feedback while implementing. FLCTwo: Create a useful online resource for thoughtful development of blended courses.
    4. 4. What new pedagogies are required for blended course design? What are the effects of blended learning on faculty teaching load? What tools best support cohesion, collaboration, communication, feedback, and assessment? What does research tell us that will inform the next generation of blended course development? How can we inform and change attitudes and perspectives of faculty and students to support learning through technology?
    5. 5. Showcase the:  impact of PD from faculty perspective  support while engaging in a FLC  variety of design approaches  web-based faculty resource guide
    6. 6. Impact Learning / Application Campus-Wide Innovation Support F2F Meetings Portal - Sharing Emails/Communication Blended Approach Asynchronous Online GoogleTools CTE Programs OCDI Mentorship Summit Preparing toTeach Brown Bags
    7. 7. Weekly instructor videos Blackboard Individualized study Blackboard and other resources of choice Building group project portfolio Google Sites (Google Drive and Google Forms) Google-based collaboration and conversations Google Sites and Google Drive / Google +Extension links / support documents Blackboard,Google Drive / Google + Personal reflection Google Sites / Google + Self, peer, instructor feedback and assessment Google Forms and Google Sites CONNECTED LEARNING
    8. 8. Impact Core course for unit Support Emails/Communication Blended Approach Asynchronous Online Blackboard SoftChalk tutorials CTE Programs OCDI Mentorship Brown Bags  Blackboard site: Suggested weekly schedule, quizzes  Online tutorials  Multimedia as advance organizer for main concepts,  Instructor video intro,  Narrated presentations,  Formative assessments,  Flashcard app,  Blog feed with topics related to content of unit
    9. 9. Impact More than Blackboard Satellite program Support Sustained engagement Faculty flexibility Program growth Blended Approach Synchronous Online/ On-Campus Wimba/Collaborate CTE Programs OCDI (x 2) Summit Mentoring Brown Bags
    10. 10. Impact More than Blackboard Satellite program Support Sustained engagement Faculty flexibility Program growth Blended Approach Synchronous Online/ On-Campus Wimba/Collaborate CTE Programs OCDI (x 2) Summit Mentoring Brown Bags
    11. 11. Impact More than Blackboard Satellite program Support Sustained engagement Faculty flexibility Program growth Blended Approach Synchronous Online/ On-Campus Wimba/Collaborate CTE Programs OCDI (x 2) Summit Mentoring Brown Bags
    12. 12. Impact More than Blackboard Satellite program Support Sustained engagement Faculty flexibility Program growth Blended Approach Synchronous Online/ On-Campus Wimba/Collaborate CTE Programs OCDI (x 2) Summit Mentoring Brown Bags
    13. 13. Impact More than Blackboard Satellite program Support Sustained engagement Faculty flexibility Program growth Blended Approach Synchronous Online/ On-Campus Wimba/Collaborate CTE Programs OCDI (x 2) Summit Mentoring Brown Bags
    14. 14. Impact More than Blackboard Satellite program Support Sustained engagement Faculty flexibility Program growth Blended Approach Synchronous Online/ On-Campus Wimba/Collaborate CTE Programs OCDI (x 2) Summit Mentoring Brown Bags
    15. 15. Impact • Campus-wide innovation Support • Network of educator/learners Blended Approach • Asynchronous online supplementation via Blackboard CTE Programs • OCDI  How can a blended course optimize and enhance the acquisition of academic listening skills?  Faculty-friendly and easily adaptable content  Design linked to curricular objectives rather than text- specific
    16. 16. Source: Blended Learning Model Definitions (Clayton Christensen Institute, 2013) http://www.christenseninstitute.org/blended- learning-model-definitions/ Rotation Model A La Carte Model (Self Blend) EnrichedVirtual Program
    17. 17. Business Marketing Cinema and Language Elementary Teacher Education
    18. 18. What is the role of ‘community’ in the design of blended learning? wp.vcu.edu/blendedlearningflc
    19. 19. From the CTE: Dr. Joyce Kincannon,Online Instructional Designer jmkincannon@vcu.edu (804) 828-1605 BrittWattwood. Senior FacultyConsultant bwatwood@vcu.edu (804) 828-1896 Blended Learning FLC: Deborah Cowles, Business Marketing dcowles@vcu.edu (804) 828-1618 Brendan Dwyer, Center for Sports Leadership bdwyer@vcu.edu (804) 827-5131 Lisa Flemming, ElementaryTeacher Education lmfleming@vcu.edu (804) 828-1898 RobertGodwin-Jones, Intercultural Communication rgjones@vcu.edu (804) 827-1111 Lisse Hildebrandt, English as a Second Language lhildebr@vcu.edu (804) 828-2551 Joanne Huebner, Adult Learning Resource Center huebnerjm@vcu.edu (804) 828-7537 Jason Levy, Emergency Management jklevy@vcu.edu (804) 828-8040 Oliver Speck, Cinema and Language ocspeck@vcu.edu (804) 827-0910

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