Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Shelving anomalies (updated August 2012)
Shelving anomalies (updated August 2012)
Shelving anomalies (updated August 2012)
Shelving anomalies (updated August 2012)
Shelving anomalies (updated August 2012)
Shelving anomalies (updated August 2012)
Shelving anomalies (updated August 2012)
Shelving anomalies (updated August 2012)
Shelving anomalies (updated August 2012)
Shelving anomalies (updated August 2012)
Shelving anomalies (updated August 2012)
Shelving anomalies (updated August 2012)
Shelving anomalies (updated August 2012)
Shelving anomalies (updated August 2012)
Shelving anomalies (updated August 2012)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Shelving anomalies (updated August 2012)

701

Published on

Published in: Education, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
701
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. ShelvingAnomalies:therefore often Cataloguing anomalies!
  • 2. Fiction Anomalies
  • 3. Mac OR Mc: that is the question.Often “Mc” is treated as though spelt “Mac”. Namessuch as “Mace” and “Mack” are sorted with thosenames which commence with “Mc” and “Mac”. McDonald, Cary MacDonald, Cary MacDonald, G MacDonald, G Mace, Henry (Mace) Mace, Henry Macey, Peter Macey, Peter McFarlane, Kathleen MacFarlane, Kathleen Mack, W. D. Mack, W. D. McKay, L. J. MacKay, L. J. MacKay, Martha MacKay, Martha
  • 4. Mac OR Mc: that is the question.Depending on the model chosen, bothshelving lists below are correct. MacDonald, G Mace, Henry Mace, Henry Macey, Peter Macey, Peter Mack, L. J. McFarlane, Kathleen MacKay, Martha Mack, W. D. McDonald, Cary McKay, L. J. McFarlane, Kathleen MacKay, Martha McKay, L. J.
  • 5. Hyphens: stuck with glueNames which contain a hyphen are treated as one word, and are sorted accordingly. Cassar-Daley, Troy King-Smith, Dick Miller-Heike, Kate
  • 6. Prefixes: not always stuck with glueA prefix is not always included as part of thesurname of an author. Beauvoir, Simone de De Burgh, Chris Le Carre, John Le Guin, Ursula O’Neill, Mary le duc
  • 7. Author Pseudonyms: alias or notSome authors write in different genres and styles, and when they do this they use a pseudonym.Krentz, Jayne Ann Castle, Jayne (fantasy) James, Stephanie Krentz, Jayne Ann (modern day) Quick, Amanda (historical)Rendell, Ruth Rendell, Ruth Vine, BarbaraRoberts, Nora Roberts, Nora (romance) Robb, J.D. (murder)
  • 8. Author Pseudonyms: alias or notSome libraries choose to catalogue to thePseudonym (as the author wanted); otherschoose to catalogue all works by one name,so customers can find everything by thatauthor.
  • 9. Shelving to the END of an authors surname and 1st nameEven though a call number has 3 or 4 letters, when shelving you shouldshelve to the end of an authors surname and then if required their 1stname.Patterson, JamesPatterson, MichaelPattinson, JamesSmith, AnnSmith, AnneSmith-Jones, Anne
  • 10. Series: together or notSometimes a series title is used to “market” books. For example:Star Trek, once again some libraries choose to catalogue underthe author’s name and others under the series title.Where would you put it?Star Trek Aftermath Bennett, Christopher L.Star Trek After the fall David, PeterStar Trek Demands of honor Ryan, KevinStar Trek Burning dreams Shatner, William
  • 11. Non-Fiction (Dewey) Anomalies
  • 12. A 820s and NZ 820sMost libraries identify Australian (A) and New Zealand (NZ) literature.However, some inter-file the Dewey numbers and others shelve these“runs” of numbers separately (between 828 and 829). Examples are: 820/ HUTC 820/ HUTC A820.803995/ GROW 820.809282/ COLE 820.809282/COLE 821.008035/ FORW 821.008035/ FORW 823.8/ DICK A821.3/ MACD A820.803995/ GROW 823.8/ DICK A821.3/ MACD 829/ AAAA 829/ AAAA
  • 13. ShakespeareShakespeare has his own special place in the Dewey system(DDC23, Vol. 3, p. 802-803). Different titles of his works havedifferent Dewey numbers.All’s well that ends well 822.33/ O1/ SHAKAnthony and Cleopatra 822.33/ S1/ SHAKHamlet 822.33/ S7/ SHAKKing Lear 822.33/ T3/ SHAKMacbeth 822.33/ T5/ SHAKRomeo and Juliet 822.33/ U3/ SHAK
  • 14. Different “runs”As you know from using the library, there are many different “runs” of Deweynumbers. The prefix depends on the type of collection or the target audience. J Junior REF or R Reference CH Chinese JQ Junior AV Audio-Visual CHJ Chinese Junior Q Quarto DVD DVD CHAV Chinese AV Y Youth Video or V Video CHDJ Chinese DVD Junior YQ Youth quarto PTC Parent Teacher CHD Chinese DVD Coll’ F Folio TMW Tell me why CH Chinese Talking TB Book P Periodical TB Talking book ++++ many, many more
  • 15. Want to practice Dewey (DDC) shelving Dewey practice online http://monarchlibrary.wikispaces.com/OrderInTheLibrary http://frank.mtsu.edu/~vvesper/dewey2.htm Pictures from © Kazmierz Szmauz Bookman, 2001. www.anyamountofbooks.com © S.Byers – August 2012 Version 2

×