Joanna anxiety in chinese efl students at different proficiency

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Joanna anxiety in chinese efl students at different proficiency

  1. 1. Anxiety in Chinese EFL students at different proficiency levels<br />1<br />Presenter: Yi-Han Yang<br /> Instructor: Dr. Pi-Ying Teresa Hsu<br /> Date: March 9, 2011<br />
  2. 2. 2<br />Citation<br />Liu, M. (2006). Anxiety in Chinese EFL students at different proficiency levels. An International Journal of Educational and Applied Linguistic, 34, 301-316.<br />
  3. 3. 3<br />Content<br />Introduction<br />I<br />Literature Review<br />II<br />Methodology<br />III<br />Result & Conclusion<br />IV<br />V<br />Reflection<br />
  4. 4. 4<br />Introduction<br />
  5. 5. 5<br />Introduction<br />Reading<br />Listening<br />1970s<br />Writing<br />Speaking<br />
  6. 6. 6<br />Purposes<br />
  7. 7. 7<br />Literature Review<br />
  8. 8. 8<br />Literature Review<br />There were three components of foreign language anxiety: <br />(Horwitz et al., 1986 )<br />Communication apprehension<br />Test anxiety<br />Fear of negative evaluation<br />
  9. 9. 9<br />Literature Review<br />Hortize et al. (1986) developed the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS),which has gained widespread popularity in subsequent research studies on anxiety in language learning situations.<br />(Aida, 1994; Chen, 2002; Cheng et al., 1999; Kitano, 2001; Phillips,<br />1992; Saito et al., 1999; Wang and Ding, 2001; Worde, 2003)<br />
  10. 10. 10<br />Literature Review<br />Experience had a significant effect on anxiety and female students were found to score on the anxiety scale higher than did males.<br /> (Aida, 1994)<br />
  11. 11. 11<br />Research questions<br />1. To what extent do the students experience anxiety in oral <br /> English classroom?<br />2. What is the difference in anxiety among the students at <br /> different proficiency levels?<br />3. In which classroom activity are the students the most <br />anxious?<br />4. Is there any change in student anxiety in different classroom <br />activities over the term?<br />
  12. 12. 12<br />Methodology<br />
  13. 13. 13<br />Methodology<br />Time:<br /> A full term (14 weeks)<br />Participant:<br />547(430male and 117 female) first-year undergraduate non-English majors enrolled in the English Listening & Speaking course.<br />Instruments:<br />Survey, observations, reflective journals and interview<br />
  14. 14. A 36-item survey adapted from the FLCAS developed by Horwitz et al. (1986)<br />ex: It frightens me when I don’t understand what the teacher is <br /> saying in English.<br />14<br />Foreign Language Class Anxiety<br />(FLCAS)<br />
  15. 15. 15<br />Instruments<br />Semi- structured interview<br />
  16. 16. 16<br />Semi-structured interview<br />A semi-structured interview is a method of research used in the social sciences.<br />A semi-structured interview is flexible, allowing new questions to be brought up during the interview as a result of what the interviewee says. <br />The interviewer in a semi-structured interview generally has a framework of themes to be explored.<br />
  17. 17. 17<br />Results and discussion<br />
  18. 18. Achieving a reliability score of 0.92 in the present research.<br />18<br />Result and discussion<br />the real number<br />percentage<br />
  19. 19. 19<br />Result and discussion<br />These numbers indicate that at least one-third of students experienced moderate to high anxiety<br />
  20. 20. 20<br />To what extent do the students experience anxiety in oral English classroom?<br />
  21. 21. 21<br />To what extent do the students experience anxiety in oral English classroom?<br />Anxious students were afraid of making mistakes in the English class.<br />Anxious students feared they would not understand all the language input was also consistent with communication apprehension.<br />Anxious students reported that they were afraid to speak and felt deeply-conscious when asked to risk revealing themselves by speaking English in the present of other people.<br />
  22. 22. 22<br />(2) What is the difference in anxiety among the students at <br /> different proficiency levels?<br />ANOVA<br />The more proficient students tended to be less anxious in English language classrooms, the difference was not significant.<br />The ANOVA results presented that proficiency/level did not play a significant role in distinguishing the students at different proficiency levels.<br />
  23. 23. 23<br />(3) In which classroom activity are the students the most anxious?<br />Most anxious<br />Least anxious<br />Being singled out to answer questions and giving presentations, were the most anxiety-provoking activities in class.<br />
  24. 24. 24<br />(4) Is there any change in student anxiety in different classroom <br /> activities over the term?<br />With increasing exposure to spoken English, many students’ anxiety levels decreased in oral communication in class during the term, a tendency not only reported by the students themselves but observed by the teachers.<br />
  25. 25. 25<br />Reflection<br />
  26. 26. 26<br />Reflection<br />
  27. 27. Thanks for your listening<br />27<br />"Only by coming to grips with difficulty <br /> can you realize your full potential."<br /> -- Charles de Gaulle, president of France <br />

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