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Different endangered species
Different endangered species
Different endangered species
Different endangered species
Different endangered species
Different endangered species
Different endangered species
Different endangered species
Different endangered species
Different endangered species
Different endangered species
Different endangered species
Different endangered species
Different endangered species
Different endangered species
Different endangered species
Different endangered species
Different endangered species
Different endangered species
Different endangered species
Different endangered species
Different endangered species
Different endangered species
Different endangered species
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Different endangered species

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All about different Endagered Species .... …

All about different Endagered Species ....



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  • 1.  
  • 2.  
  • 3.
    • The Monkey-eating Eagle,  Pithecophaga jefferyi , is a fine forest eagle of the Philippines. It has remarkably strong legs and an extremely deep and compressed bill. It is about 3 feet tall with a 6-1/2 foot wingspan. It weighs about 14 pounds. The average life expectancy is anywhere from 30 to 60 years.
  • 4.  
  • 5.
    • The Philippine tarsier, tarsius Syrichta, has soft gray fur, a body length of about 5 inches (13 centimeters), and a tail length that is twice as long (9 inches, or 23 centimeters). It weighs about 4 to 5 ounces (113 to 142 grams). The head is round and the snout is short. The enormous eyes that seem too big for the sockets are immobile. The tarsier swivels its head, sometimes almost a full circle. The large, thinly textured ears move like giant antennas to track sounds made by crawling insects and other prey. The nearly naked tail has a sandy coloration, with a tuft of hair at the tip.
  • 6.  
  • 7.
    • The sea cow, Hydrodamalis gigas, grew to at least 8 meters (26 ft) to 9 meters (30 ft) in length as an adult, [3]  much larger than the  manatee  or  dugong ; however, concerning their weight, Steller's work contains two contradictory estimates:4 and 24.3 metric tons. The true value is estimated to lie between these figures, at around 8 to 10 t. [4] It looked somewhat like a large  seal , but had two stout forelimbs and a  whale -like tail and the fluke . 
  • 8.  
  • 9.
    • The wild water buffalo ( Bubalus arnee ) also called Asian buffalo and Asiatic buffalo is a large bovine  native to  Southeast Asia . The species is listed as  endangered  on the  IUCN Red List  since 1986 as the remaining population totals less than 4,000, with an estimate of fewer than 2,500 mature individuals. [1]
  • 10.  
  • 11.
    • The Philippine Mouse-deer , Tragulus nigricans , also known as the Balabac Mouse Deer orPilandok (in  Filipino ).It has a black and brown coat with white stripes on the throat and chest. It has slender legs and an arched back that is covered by brown fur, with a white base. A dark line runs from each ear past the eye toward the nose.
  • 12.  
  • 13.
    • The Philippine crocodile ( Crocodylus mindorensis ) is a relatively small freshwater crocodilian endemic to the Philippines. Growing no more than 3 meters, they have a relatively broad snout and thick bony plates on its back(heavy dorsal armor). Females are slightly smaller than males. Philippine crocodiles are golden-brown in color, which darkens as it matures.
  • 14.  
  • 15.
    • The whale shark,  Rhincodon typus , is a slow-moving  filter feeding   shark , the largest living fish   species . The largest confirmed individual was 12.65 metres (41.50 ft) in length. The heaviest weighed more than 36 tonnes (79,000 lb), [3]  but unconfirmed claims report considerably larger whale sharks. 
  • 16.  
  • 17.
    • The Dwarf Goby ,Perccottus glehni , a small freshwater fish of the family Eleotridae. Length, up to 20 cm. Color varies from light to dark; in mating its coloration turns nearly black, and irregular dark-reddish spots appear on the sides.
  • 18.  
  • 19.
    • The sinarapan ( Mistichthys luzonensis ) is the world's smallest commercially-harvested fish located only in the  Philippines . They are  endemic  to the  Bicol Region , specifically in  Lake Buhi , Lake Bato ,  Bicol River  and other bodies of water in  Camarines Sur   province . Sinarapan are a type of  goby  and they are  transparent , except for the black eyes. The fish have an average length of 12.5 millimeters. Males are smaller than females.
  • 20.  
  • 21.
    • The  monitor lizard   (Varanus salvator) can range in size from smallish (about 1/2 foot) to medium, to very large! The  Blackthroat Monitor , for instance, can reach the body size equivalent to that of a 3-year-old-child. A  Water Monitor  is also quite sizable, and so is a  Savannah Monitor 1 , even though it is considered a medium sized monitor
  • 22.  
  • 23.
    • Sea turtles (superfamily Chelonioidea) are marine  reptiles  that inhabit all of the world's oceans except the  Arctic . The  superfamily  Chelonioidea has a world-wide distribution; sea turtles can be found in all oceans except for the polar regions. [ citation needed ]  Some species travel between oceans. The  flatback sea turtle  is found solely on the northern coast of  Australia . According to  SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment , a lifespan of 80 years is feasible for sea turtles. [1]
  • 24.
        • THE END

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