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As you command my queen bee
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As you command my queen bee

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Bee Presentation

Bee Presentation

Published in: Technology, Business
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  • 1. JEFFREY AND KLEMENTE AS YOU COMMAND MY QUEEN.
  • 2. HONEY BEES A N D M AT H ? • Some questions are difficult to answer through observation • We can model these systems and provide defined areas of focus for researchers
  • 3. W H AT A B O U T THE BEES? • Honey Bees create hives of hexagonal cells that are filled with larvae, brood, and pollen. • We don’t know how Honey Bees maintain their hive structures or why some hives fail. • Models offer insight
  • 4. W H AT D O W E KNOW? • Queen Bees deposit larvae (brood) into cells. • Worker Bees collect pollen for food and nectar to make honey. • Nurse Bees raise larvae with honey and pollen. • Thus brood need to be close to honey cells
  • 5. HONEY CELL POLLEN CELL
  • 6. M A N Y FA C T O R S I N F L U E N C E R E S O U R C E DISTRIBUTION WITHIN A HIVE • Temperature • Pollen availability • Size of hive • Amount of resources consumed • The number of eggs a queen lays an hour
  • 7. THE COMPUTER MODEL • 45 cells wide • 75 cells tall • 60 day period • 12 hour day and night cycles • Queen lays 42-84 eggs an hour
  • 8. THE COMPUTER MODEL CONTINUED • Queen’s cell variation rate; cells per hour • Preferential nectar consumption radius; cells • Average honey collection; loads per day
  • 9. THE MODEL CONTINUED • Ratio of pollen collection to honey collection • Ratio of pollen consumption to pollen collection • Ration of honey consumption to honey collection • Temporal distribution of daily nectar and pollen collection
  • 10. W H AT D O E S T H E M O D E L T E L L SCIENTISTS? • Sensitivity • Queen visitation rate • Average honey per day • Ratio of pollen collection to honey collection
  • 11. TURNS OUT • If you bias the queens movement towards the center of the hive, honey bees will maintain the patterning seen in nature. • Bees do not need to know where everything is in the hive. • Focusing on a few factors is key to understanding how Honey Bee’s organize their hives.

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