The Role Of Chinese Music

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The Role of Chinese music in Thai and Chinese culture

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  • Dear Ms Jintana Barton
    Congradualation. Your beautiful presentation help me to know more about music in Thialand and southern China.
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  • Music as a part of Chinese culture Confucius (circa 551-479 BC), the great Chinese philosopher, was an important influence on the spirit of the Chinese people and made significant contributions to the civilization of the world. He taught the ‘Six Arts’ - ritual, music, archery, chariot riding, calligraphy, and computation. It is also clear that he regarded ritual (morality) as the most important subject, and the second most important one was music. He emphasized music, and included music in his educational process.
  • ‘ Scholars don’t leave their musical instruments without a reason.’ Music is one part in literati’s way of life and music has been very important in the life of people of China.
  • The activities that occur along with Chinese music always include the dance, drama, opera, ceremonial prayer or chant. Chinese music activities can be described as follows: Music for accompaniment Music for Entertainment Music in Ritual or Merit Music for learning
  • The activities that occur along with Chinese music always include the dance, drama, opera, ceremonial prayer or chant. Chinese music activities can be described as follows: The activities that occur along with Chinese music always include the dance, drama, opera, ceremonial prayer or chant. Chinese music activities can be described as follows:
  • Chinese musical instruments used in Chaozhou opera are generally divided into two parts, one side is the string ensemble group (Xiansi yue) and the other side is the percussion group (Drum and gongs).
  • The larger ceremonies that take place in a Chinese temple usually have music accompaniment when the monks pray or chant. In both Thailand and China, the groups that play in these temples have been hired or they may be local groups in the area who have been invited to perform as the temples do not have resident bands or groups. Chinese musical instruments in Buddhist ritual music comprise the drum, Gong, cymbals and the Yangqin or Suona (Chinese wind instrument). Sometimes the Erhu is added. Music ensembles can be large or small.
  • In Thailand the Gongde is held in both Thai and Chinese circles, either at a Chinese temple or a Thai Buddhist temple and are attended by both Chinese descendants and Thai people. Today live Chinese music performed in concert is observed in the Gongde ceremony and Buddhist ritual music only.
  • In Shantou, it is the Guzheng, the most popular Chinese folk music instrument that Chinese girls love to play. A Guzheng class home school at Jin Xin Dasha, Shantou
  • In Chon Buri’s San De Shantang ’s Chinese music group, the musicians are local students (8-17 years old). Some are Chinese descendant’s children, but most of them are Thai workers or children of farmers. The music class was sponsored by the San De foundation . The foundation has a van to pick the students come to study and drive them back home after class. The songs that th ey learned were Chaozhou folk songs, and some Thai songs, such as the National Anthem , Sadudi Maha Raja or a salute to The King and Queen of Thailand and the Royal Anthem.
  • Guangzhou, China is a big market for music recordings in the form of cassette-tapes, CDs, VCDs and DVDs. Chinese folk music concerts are usually recorded for commercial reproduction. It is a thriving business and Guangdong province has many joint venture companies and industrial factories. Guzheng and Erhu played by Li Yang and Li Hui, a well-known Chinese musician, can be found in the Thai market. In the recordings they played both Thai popular and classic songs. The Guzheng is also played along with Soo Doeng (Thai fiddle) by Theera Phumanee and Apichai Pongluelert, Thai musicians.
  • Kim has been developed over the hundred years in Thailand. They are made many shapes and sizes and the painting on Kim box is a Thai style painting. Today Japanese cartoon pictures are stick on Kim boxes and the box is very colorful and exciting for children. Many schools in Bangkok offer Kim classes. Kim class teachers are Thai, and they learned to play Thai classical songs, not Chinese songs.
  • Kim has been developed over the hundred years in Thailand. They are made many shapes and sizes and the painting on Kim box is a Thai style painting. Today Japanese cartoon pictures are stick on Kim boxes and the box is very colorful and exciting for children. Many schools in Bangkok offer Kim classes. Kim class teachers are Thai, and they learned to play Thai classical songs, not Chinese songs.
  • Chinese students are motivated to study music both as a career and as a hobby The style of Chinese music in Thailand is a more conservative style, and the Thai-Chinese musicians do not experiment much due to the lack of competition and public motivation. Most of their motivation comes from their community, family, temple or just love of the music. both as a career and as a hobby
  • The Role Of Chinese Music

    1. 1. T he Role of Chinese music in Chinese and Thai Culture Dr. Jintana Thunwaniwat Chulalongkorn University Bangkok,Thailand
    2. 2. Music in China
    3. 4. From China to Thailand
    4. 5. Guangdong – Chaozhou-Shantou Chaozhou dialect
    5. 6. Chaozhou culture
    6. 7. Chaozhou: Land of music
    7. 8. Chinese music in China and Thailand <ul><li>Chinese m usic i s a part of Chinese culture </li></ul><ul><li>Chinese music is an imported culture in Thailand </li></ul>
    8. 9. Chinese music activities in China and Thailand <ul><li>Music for accompaniment </li></ul><ul><li>Music for Entertainment </li></ul><ul><li>A mateur musical groups as a hobby </li></ul><ul><li>M usic in Ritual Ceremony </li></ul><ul><li>Music class </li></ul>
    9. 10. Music for accompaniment <ul><li>Lion Dance </li></ul><ul><li>Dragon Dance </li></ul><ul><li>Yingge D ance </li></ul><ul><li>Chaozhou Opera </li></ul>
    10. 11. Lion Dance
    11. 12. Lion Dance group in South China Normal University
    12. 13. Lion Dance in China
    13. 14. Traitmitr Middle School’s Lion Dance group
    14. 15. Lion Dance group in Bangkok
    15. 16. Dragon Dance
    16. 17. Dragon Dance group in South China Normal University
    17. 18. Lady Dragon Dance group in South China Normal University
    18. 19. Thai Dragon Dance groups in Nakhon Sawan
    19. 20. Naga
    20. 21. Dragon and Naga Dance together
    21. 22. Yingge D anc e
    22. 23. Chaozhou Opera
    23. 24. Chaozhou opera in Shantou
    24. 25. Chaozhou opera in Bangkok
    25. 26. Music for Entertainment Amateur musical groups as a hobby
    26. 27. Yulan music group in Yixi district, Chaozhou
    27. 28. Zhulin yueshe in Shantou
    28. 29. Chinese music group in Chon Buri
    29. 30. Twenty-four-drum group in Samut Prakan
    30. 31. Jitaikor-Chinese music group in Bangkok
    31. 32. Chinese m usic in Ritual Ceremony
    32. 33. Buddhist ritual music
    33. 34. Gongde Ceremony in Shantou
    34. 35. Gongde Ceremony in Bangkok
    35. 36. Chinese m usic Class
    36. 37. Guzheng class in Shantou
    37. 38. Guzheng class in Bangkok
    38. 39. Erhu, Kim class in Bangkok
    39. 40. Chinese music class i n Chon Buri
    40. 41. Chinese music in commercial enterprises
    41. 42. Chinese music instruments in Thai culture
    42. 43. Shape, size, painting on Kim box
    43. 44. Conclusion <ul><li>CHINA </li></ul><ul><li>M usic school </li></ul><ul><li>Test for music ability </li></ul><ul><li>Music competition </li></ul><ul><li>Career and hobby </li></ul><ul><li>Conservative style </li></ul><ul><li>New style </li></ul><ul><li>(neo-folk Music) </li></ul><ul><li>THAILAND </li></ul><ul><li>Chinese m usic class in language school </li></ul><ul><li>More hobby </li></ul><ul><li>Conservative style </li></ul>
    44. 45. Good-Bye 再 见

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