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Knowledge Garden Cultivation: How to stay ahead of the curve and deliver Just In Time Learning using crowd-sourced student content.

Knowledge Garden Cultivation: How to stay ahead of the curve and deliver Just In Time Learning using crowd-sourced student content.

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  • This graphic illustrates the typical linear progression of diffusion from the innovator through the organization to the end consumer (student). Each cycle can take from 12 to 18 months creating a huge time gap or lag phase in learning between the innovator and the end consumer. The challenge that the Knowledge Garden project seeks to address is collapsing that gap to near zero by bringing the end consumer (student) as close to the innovation space as possible. Experiencing what I refer to as a state of “Perpetual Beta.”It stands to reason that businesses and institutions need to “sync up” with innovation drivers and this can be accomplished through two initiatives: 1. Move from a vendor client relationship to a strategic/collaborative partnership (Adobe Partner programs like the Adobe Partners by Design, the Adobe Education Exchange and the Adobe Education Leaders community are good example) and 2. Adopt business/design processes and methodologies, like Agile Development Frameworks, used by these innovation drivers in order to facilitate rapid innovation, integration and deployment.
  • This shows a traditional “assembly line” approach to technology integration in an educational setting where innovations pass through the hands of administrators, IT, faculty and on to a mass of students. This was manageable when innovation cycles were longer and technologies were simpler and fewer in number.
  • With an expansion of innovation companies a significant BACKLOG occurs in the vetting process. The emergence of learning content on the internet created opportunities for students to circumvent lags in delivery of learning by accessing knowledge directly from the internet. In this scenario the relevance of the professor as sole arbiter of learning is undermined as the professor becomes one of many access points for learning. Here the linear chain of delivery becomes unsupportable. Throwing people and money at the problem does not address the fundamental problem of organization!
  • This is a simplified overview of the new ecosystem being evolved in my KD Lab. In its final iteration students will engage with beta level technologies, document their use and apply them to a problem or a context provided by the community partner and facilitated by technology partners like Adobe, faculty experts and internal IT. This is a problem-based or Applied Research approach to learning. There is currently a pilot research project that will use Adobe’s DPS to design and distribute an internal newsletter on e-Learning to faculty. This will bring together students from Marketing, Business and Design to build an interactive communications vehicle, monitor and analyze content engagement, provide re-design intelligence and to map and document the workflows in order to build curriculum and inform enterprise-level use of the technology.
  • We facilitate BETA engagement by brokering strategic relationships between innovation companies and our students—essentially bringing them to the same table. It is a form of DIRECT ACCESS at the earliest possible phase of diffusion versus a LAGGED, VICARIOUS, MEDIATED ACCESS.
  • This is a detailed view of the emerging ecosystem of relationships that faculty broker in order to facilitate direct engagement with innovation drivers. The focus is on bringing all stakeholders to the table in order to leverage, faculty, student and technology partners in solving problems for community partners. These partners can be government, external agencies, business or internal departments within the institution. In the case of the Adobe DPS pilot we are leveraging the Business division for supplying project management students, the Marketing division for supplying student and faculty expertise in market analyses, the The Innovation in Teachingand Learning Engagement hub (TITLEh) fpr content development, content engagement analysis and content design. Design students will work on the design and production of the work and will work with all parties to map and document workflows. Adobe, our innovation partner will provide resources in the form of technical consulting and software licensing. The client or community partner will be our own internal Innovation in Teachingand Learning Engagement hub (TITLEh). Other internal clients have been the School of Design—we created a student generated knowledge repository of searchable user manuals and podcasts featuring the use of Adobe tools.
  • The Knowledge Garden incorporates a Just-In-Time teaching methodology, strategic partnering with innovation drivers, cross-disciplinary resources, crowd-sourcing of content and engagement with a basket of emerging and enabling technologies.
  • We deployed an Open Source social network (on.georgebrown.ca) that facilitates conversation between faculty, alumni and industry. It is a Facebook for Education that extends conversation to a broader community that follows a student from their first year on into their lives as working professionals. Note my Special interest pages in the left column that aggregates discussions on particular technologies. An Adobe Product News page echoes feeds from Adobe on product announcements with links to Adobe TV and other resources.
  • Exploration of Virtual environments like Adobe Connect were exploited to extend the notion of the classroom and bring expertise in to the lab. We reflected on best practices and dealing effectively with the dissociative nature of the virtual world.
  • An opportunity to compare the merits of a competing product allowed more critical comparisons of functionality. Adobe Connect was more flexible and user friendly and output video assets faster.
  • We were able to explore the use of an Open Source project management environment to allocate and track project resources, deliverables and timelines. This was compared against BaseCamp—a competing product.
  • We explored the use of building workdgroups for filesharing, and co-authoring/reviewing documents using acrobat.com/sendNow and Buzzword.
  • We used a cloud-based environment called Zotero for amassing links to reference material for our research.
  • Used a mapping tool to map complex processes and workflows in order to simplify them and make them more accessible.
  • Used InDesign to publish content in the form of eBooks and Interactive Content for mobile deployment. A broad spectrum of tools were used to generate content. The majority of those tools were part of the Adobe CS Master Collection.
  • Students were tasked with researching specific tools and functions, demonstrating use and designing support materials in the form of PDF manuals and, more recently, eBooks and DPS Apps.
  • Students were tasked with researching specific tools and functions, demonstrating use and designing support materials in the form of PDF manuals and, more recently, eBooks and DPS Apps.
  • Students were tasked with researching specific tools and functions, demonstrating use and designing support materials in the form of PDF manuals and, more recently, eBooks and DPS Apps.
  • Students developed supporting podcasts that were targeted for consumption on mobile devices. This leveraged the latent media savvy of the students resulting in the production of assets that were rich, user-friendly and in their own vernacular. They proved to be more engaging than the dry podcasts that instructors typically generated.
  • Students were tasked with curating the resources that they created on to a WIKI and to add commentary. They were free to experiment with the form in which they organized their content. They often self-branded their spaces, included resource links in addition to the required assets. These assets were tagged with metadata to make them searchable. The result was the creation of a searchable knowledgebase that could be utilized by other professors and students as a learning resource. In short, this was the emergence of crowdsourcing of student-generated learning assets. This prompted a massive spike in content production that eclipsed what I or any other professor could have generated in a term. The professor’s role became that of providing direction for exploration, guidance for information design and for recognizing excellence and promoting exemplary work for mass consumption. The professor became a harvester of the knowledge assets produced. This also had the effect of offsetting the effects of rapid obsolescense. The content production load was now a distributed phenomenon.
  • Students were tasked with curating the resources that they created on to a WIKI and to add commentary. They were free to experiment with the form in which they organized their content. They often self-branded their spaces, included resource links in addition to the required assets. These assets were tagged with metadata to make them searchable. The result was the creation of a searchable knowledgebase that could be utilized by other professors and students as a learning resource. In short, this was the emergence of crowdsourcing of student-generated learning assets. This prompted a massive spike in content production that eclipsed what I or any other professor could have generated in a term. The professor’s role became that of providing direction for exploration, guidance for information design and for recognizing excellence and promoting exemplary work for mass consumption. The professor became a harvester of the knowledge assets produced. This also had the effect of offsetting the effects of rapid obsolescense. The content production load was now a distributed phenomenon.
  • Offloading content creation and curation to students paved the way for direct engagement with un-proven BETA technologies. Given that students were engaging with their object of inquiry at the same entry point as the professor, they were on an equal footing and became, by default, co-researchers and co-producers of knowledge. Given that there is little or no documentation in the BETA realm the learning takes the form of an exploration narrative. Students explore and discover their object of inquiry then map and document their experiences in order to share their experiential narrative with those who will follow them. Adobe created the opportunity for a limited number of my students to engage at this level resulting in learning experiences and the production of learning resources that was in advance of the consumer release of the software. This was a huge advance in addressing the lag in delivery of learning alluded to earlier in the presentation and gave our students a skill set on technologies that were just emerging. It was the first example of Just In Time Learning at our school. Note that the podcast featured here is showcasing the use of InDesign CS6 to publish mobile content and the date stamp on the podcast shows April 25th, 2012. The software was not released until Mid may of that year. This is an idea that I brought to Adobe in 2011 and with their support it was made possible. It is an idea that I would like to expand upon.
  • Much of what was learned in the knowledge garden lab was transferred to faculty through a workshop where students assumed a mentorship role. The main focus was engaging faculty to explore the implementation of the social network as a communications vehicle, the WIKI service to build course content and student portfolio WIKIS. They were given hands-on explorations of other resources such as VUEs, Social Bookmarking, Collaborative environments, Virtual Classrooms and were provided training on authoring content for mobile using the Adobe InDesign/DPS workflow and the Apple IBooks authoring platform. This resulted in the integration of branded course and student wikis and course pages in the open network for over 14 courses over two of our programs. The idea behind these workshops was to build faculty/student teams where the students would assist the faculty with content development for mobile. I have made outreach attempts to other divisions in the hopes of bringing the power of design and the environments and tools to other areas of the college.
  • In order to promote the use of mobile content authoring and modernize asset creation and delivery for learning I brokered a research pilot in conjunction with the Teaching Innovation and Learning hub to utilize the DPS workflow for creating a newsletter on e-Learning. It will bring together a marketing student, project management student and design student to design, publish and monitor engagement to inform future designs and cull data from users. The students will document and map their respective workflows. This pilot will be used to inform curriculum development for marketing business and design as well as work as a proof of value for an internal enterprise deployment of the technology. It may also have the potential of forming the basis of an academic publishing press.
  • In order to promote the use of mobile content authoring and modernize asset creation and delivery for learning I brokered a research pilot in conjunction with the Teaching Innovation and Learning hub to utilize the DPS workflow for creating a newsletter on e-Learning. It will bring together a marketing student, project management student and design student to design, publish and monitor engagement to inform future designs and cull data from users. The students will document and map their respective workflows. This pilot will be used to inform curriculum development for marketing business and design as well as work as a proof of value for an internal enterprise deployment of the technology. It may also have the potential of forming the basis of an academic publishing press.

Transcript

  • 1. Digital Curriculae &Cross DisciplinaryCollaborationThe evolution of the Knowledge Garden initiative
  • 2. The Knowledge GardenPhilosophy• Just In Time educational experiences (Perpetual BETA)• Non-linear/hierarchal learning• Mapping Complexity and Metacognition• Crowdsourcing Educational Content• Student Curation of Learning Activities (Process Portfolios)• Social Learning Tools & Environments• Empowering non-design educational domains with creative tools.• Mobile Publishing• Evaluation, Metrics & Monetization
  • 3. The Challenges• Technology is ubiquitous• Technology innovation cycles are aggressive. The product ecosystem is expanding hyperbolically and this makes it increasingly difficult to manage in large organizations.• Moving from avoidance, to coping and on through to effective, agile adaptation to the turbulence caused by rapid (12 month) cycles of technological innovation/obsolescence.• We have moved from manufacturing to the knowledge economy and all sectors of our economy need to bring innovative products and services to market.• There are access gaps to the tools needed to create these cutting edge products and services.
  • 4. The Vision• Faculty, students, innovation companies, IT work together to solve problems for community clients (Applied Research model) in ways that allow students and faculty to engage with technologies at the earliest possible phase of diffusion (BETA) and in ways that allow them to provide input into the evolution of these technologies.• Students engage in exploration of these technologies and MAP their exploration in order to provide simplified pathways and workflows through a rabbit warren of technologies.• Students document and share their experiences via journaling, messaging, discussion boards, audio and video.• Students curate and structure their activities in a WIKI repository that is accessible and searchable by others. Students become co-researchers, co-authors.• Faculty harvest exemplary work and reference it in the LMS.• Publish work for Mobile consumption and use metrics to monitor content engagement to inform design.• Monetize activity.• Promote digital literacy and access to digital tools throughout the college via strategic Educational License Agreements (School of Design students have access to full $2,000.00 CS6 master suite for $120 materials fee. College wide would cost $50/student.
  • 5. Potential• May-June Intensive Workshop: social networks and tools, WIKIS and content creation, curation, Video Podcasting and Mobile Publishing.• Cross-disciplinary course that brings together faculty and students from design and busines (and other disciplines) to explore new paradigms of learning, media creation and curation tools.• Collaborative research projects with mobile publishing targeted as a distribution vehicle.• Students from all college areas gain access to, and expertise in, Digital content authoring tools.
  • 6. The Innovation Diffusion Cycle 12-18 Month Lag Phase in Learning
  • 7. The Linear Production Paradigm The Factory Model INNOVATION CHAIN & Product Diffusion Cycles in the Teaching and Learning Environment 1. TRADITIONAL—Pre-Internet: Linear, Hierarchal "Factory" Mass Production Model with a long, stable window of time between development and deployment (5-10 years) New Product Production Cycle (5-10 New ProductInnovators Administration New Product New Product Years) New Product IT Support Students Faculty 5-10 Years
  • 8. Backlog: Shortcomings of Linear Deployment Chains INNOVATION CHAIN & Product Diffusion Cycles in the Teaching and Learning Environment 3. INSTANTANEOUS—OUT OF PHASE (2008-Present): DOWNSTREAM is Out of step with the UPSTREAM. UPSTREAM is Non-Linear, Distributed, Networked, Non-Hierarchal Mature "agile" development and distribution methods facilitate (12-18 months) shortened innovation cycle. Increased competition and expanded Current Product and product offerings and capabilities expand into cloud and App ecosystems causing hyperbolic expansion of the product ecosystem. Characterized by Perpetual BETA, CLOUD, MOBILE, MICRO-APPS . Knowledge From WIKIPEDIA Learning content is EPHEMERAL and constitutes a sizable investment by faculty to maintain current assets. DOWNSTREAM remains in traditional linear, hierarchal model. UNSUPPORTABLE and OUT OF SYNC with UPSTREAM CYCLE. In this model we are ineffective as a reliable channel of up-to-date resources. This results in students increasing their reliance on alternative conduits of learning, effectively reducing the value that we provide to our clients. Current Product Knowledge From Web Pages Current Product Knowledge From Chat Agile, Diverse Innovation Teams Forums Alternative Sources Current Product Knowledge From Social Sites Current Product Current Product Knowledge Knowledge From Alternative YouTube From Product Support Sources Resources Alternative Sources New Product New Product Alternative Alternative Alternative Sources Sources Sources New Product Product Evaluation and Deployment Backlog Learning Assets are EPHEMERAL. Product Evaluation and Deployment Backlog Learning Assets are EPHEMERAL. Product Evaluation and Deployment Backlog Learning Assets are EPHEMERAL. Product Evaluation and Deployment Backlog Learning Assets are EPHEMERAL. New Product New ProductAgile, Diverse Innovation Teams New Product Administration IT Support Faculty Students Production Cycle (18-24 months) New Product 12-18 Months New Product New Product NEXT SLIDE Agile, Diverse Innovation Teams
  • 9. Round Table Re-org.
  • 10. SynchronicityThe Move to Perpetual BETA
  • 11. Enter the Knowledge Garden:• It is predicated on engaging students with a basket of enabling technologies that facilitate collaborative, cross-disciplinary, project- based, applied learning/research opportunities.• It seeks to solve problems for community partners (internal and external).• It promotes direct engagement with innovation drivers (technology partners like Adobe) at the earliest possible phase of diffusion (BETA) in order to facilitate Just In Time Learning.• It crowd-sources the development of knowledge assets from the student population and harvests exemplary assets—making them available to the broader community in a searchable repository.• The Knowledge Garden seeks to make its assets compatible with mobile delivery.• The Knowledge Garden hopes to explore the possibility of monetizing the products and services it creates.
  • 12. The Core Technologies• Open Source Social Networks (on.georgebrown.ca)• Open Source Project Management tools (Project Pier)• Visual Understanding Environments for mapping complex workflows.• Adobe BETA releases for early product engagement.• Adobe CS tools for content creation and authoring.• Adobe DPS for publishing and mobile deployment.• WIKIS for content curation and podcasting.• Other ancillary products, preferably in BETA, are incorporated into the discovery process and their efficacy is evaluated.
  • 13. Environments:Building a Community
  • 14. Environments:Connecting a Community of Learners viathe Virtual Classroom: Adobe Connect.
  • 15. Environments:Connecting a Community of Learners viathe Virtual Classroom: Blackboard Collaborate.
  • 16. Environments:Project Management
  • 17. Environments:Collaborative Spaces—Acrobat.com
  • 18. Environments:Research—Zotero
  • 19. Tools:Visual Understanding Environments (VUEs)—Inspiration/Webspiration
  • 20. Tools:Mobile/Interactive Content Design and Publishing
  • 21. Knowledge Transfer:Student Resources—How To Manuals
  • 22. Knowledge Transfer:Student Resources—How To Manuals
  • 23. Knowledge Transfer:Student Resources—How To Manuals
  • 24. Knowledge Transfer:Student Resources—Podcasts
  • 25. Content Curation:Growing and Tending and Harvesting The Knowledge Garden
  • 26. Content Curation:Growing and Tending and Harvesting The Knowledge Garden
  • 27. RISK (Rapid Integration of Skills and Knowledge):Moving to Perpetual Beta
  • 28. Promoting Best Practices:Faculty workshops
  • 29. Building Capacity:Adobe DPS Research Pilot in Cross-platform publishing for education
  • 30. Building Capacity:Adobe DPS Research Pilot—A cross-disciplinary approach• Strategic Partnership with Innovation Company (Adobe)• Integrate DPS capacity in Teaching Innovation & Learning to create an interactive digital publication/app with a content focus on e- Learning.• Distribute to faculty.• Marketing student to collect and analyze engagement metrics• Design student to design and publish content.• Business student provides logistical/project management support.• Students document and map workflows, provide analysis, support and documentation to facilitate curriculum development (Marketing and Design) and/or the founding of a digital academic press and/or internal communications infrastructure.• Key faculty provide project oversight• Potential for structuring as an applied research project with support from the research office.
  • 31. Leading a transformation inTeaching and Learning• Knowledge Design I course created to build skills in 2nd year design students for creating and curating learning content.• Knowledge Design II created as a follow-up which applies skills learned in a live project environment that serves either external or internal clients.• KD II designed to bring faculty and students from KD I into the same environment to collaborate on creating learning content.• KD II is offered to faculty throughout the college to assist in content generation.• KD II students provide mentoring and production capacity.• KD II students are ideally paid via a fee for service model from departmental budgets, grants and/or private sector funding.