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Cepsm webinar branding for associations-feb 8 2011_final
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  • Slide to be live while people are calling in.
  • Welcome to our first Webinar in the Success Association Marketing Series.We hope you have lots of colleagues around the table with you.Before we begin, I’d like to do some quick housekeeping around how this will proceed.
  • Today’s Webinar Branding for Associations will be1 hour in lengthPlease note that you are muted to avoid any background noise until 2pm at which time you will be made live to ask questions.Please make note of your questions as we navigate through and we are allocating 30 minutes for Q&A at the end.Now I’d like to briefly remind you of the series of Webinars.
  • This year-long series takes you through all the key subject areas to support your association in its marketing and communications and coach you to success.The investment structure has been designed to make it easy and affordable for you to take all 10 sessions and will include a certificate of completion to substantiate your new breadth of knowledge. If you want to take only one the cost is $95 and the next level of savings is 3 at $250.00, 5 for $395 or 10 for $695.We hope you’ll be joining us for many more Webinars.
  • Jim Mintz, Managing Partner of CEPSM,Jim is a veteran marketing professional with over 25 years of experience as a practitioner and academic. Jim’s focus is improving the effectiveness of marketing and communications in public and non-profit sectors. He has taught marketing in North America, Asia, Europe, Australia and Africa. He is Program Director of the “Professional Certificate in Public Sector and Non-Profit Marketing” at the Sprott School of Business at Carleton University. He also lectures at the University of South Florida and has also taught marketing for many years at the undergraduate and graduate levels.He was formerly Director of Marketing and Corporate Communications at Health Canada and held senior marketing positions in the private sector, and crown corporations.
  • We live in a very competitive world. Members and clients are becoming more demanding and associations must work harder to secure their fundamental relationships. Building distinctive relationships with your clients’ members as well as your stakeholders is what branding is about. The brand is the marketer’s most advanced emotional tool. It combines and reinforces the functional and emotional benefits of your programs, products and services. A good brand facilitates recognition, makes a promise and delivers satisfaction.   
  • Branding in associations has become a strategic tool for many associations because of its ability to create visibility effectively and encourage loyalty. However, branding is often misunderstood and not used as effectively as it could or should be. Therefore, before implementing a branding strategy it is important to fully understand what branding is and what it involves and how associations can use branding. Those get a free copy of the Guide to Branding in the Public and Not-for Profit Sectors which tells you everything you need to know about branding for your organization. Go to our site.
  • Brand is built on two levels: Mass level, through advertising, public relations, community involvement social media digital marketing etc.Personal level, through client interactions created through unique experiences clients have in dealing with organization every day across multiple touch points.
  • Developing effective graphics and visual representations of the brand insufficient in creating, representing, and managing a brand. Reality of organization and attitudes and behaviours of employees have to be commensurate with the brand values that the organization is projecting with its publics.
  • Branding starts on inside and moves outward. Making brand promises and creating brand images/expectations are of no value without internal practices and attitudes to deliver the brand promise. Relationships priority of branding and must permeate an organizational culture. Commitment of every member of organization critical for delivering consistently on brand promise. Shared passion creates powerful tool for building long term relationships, trust and loyalty.
  • Building a strong brand takes time. Understanding needs, expectations, and experiences of target audiences most important part of this processInvolves getting to know your organization.Branding doesn’t change what organization does on daily basis, changes how you do it.Branding is connecting projects and what you do to an overall brand vision and creating experiences for your clients that reflect the brand values.
  • Popular misconception that brand building is synonymous with large budgets and major marketing efforts. Successful branding effort requires communicating brand to clients and stakeholders, but does not require significant advertising or marketing investment
  • As shown in the figure above, brand can be central to your organization’s strategic planning. A brand creates internal benefits in various areas which are ultimately reflected in the delivery of your brand promise.Not only is branding a great strategic investment for your organization, it also provides greater leverage of marketing resources. Since branding strategies are not restricted to advertising or promotion, a strong brand can ultimately help you spend less on marketing efforts and make budgets go further.
  • Your product offering could be an idea, a cause, or a service. Promoting these intangible offerings can often be difficult; by having to break through all the clutter to reach target audiences. Branding helps make your intangible product or service more tangible, which ultimately makes it easier to differentiate from competition and communicate with your target audiences. Branding can also help organizations move into new product lines. Using the existing brand as a platform for new products or services brings value to the new products because of the equity established and the positive association between the established brand and new initiatives.
  • Branding facilitates consensus building within your agency or organization. Focusing on “them, not us” will lead to great collaboration among organization members. Communication silos are often a challenge that members of associations face; branding will help break down the silos within your association By engaging all members of your association there will be an increased level of involvement and buy-in to the entire branding process which ultimately leads to the increased ability of your association to deliver your brand promise.
  • The branding process features action plan that includes internal and external research, Development of potential branding models and platforms, validation of proposed direction with clients members, stakeholders and employees, 1 to 2 year implementation plan for communicating and supporting the brand both externally and internally. The impact of the brand strategy needs to be monitored
  • This stage can be challenging & involves identifying who your competitors actually are. Competitor identification includes both direct and indirect competitors and will assist in determining the unique points of difference of your brand. In order to determine these, your organization will have to dig deep; in depth research of the competitive landscape will need to be done. Key questions to ask may include: What makes your brand a good or better choice than the competition? What do you offer that the competition doesn’t? What can you do better?
  • Above is an illustration of the strategic gap that organizations at this stage in the branding process come to realize. In order to discover your existing state, your organization must conduct research; this research will help you determine where you stand in the mind of target audiences. Once your existing state is determined, your organization can make decisions based on research and analysis about where you desire to be and how to get there.This involves articulating your desired brand identity; how do you want your target audiences to think, feel, and react when they are exposed to your brand? This is your organization’s chance to envision how you hope target audiences will respond. Once deciding where you want your organization to go in terms of building its brand, it is important to determine how to get to this new position. To find this path, your association must determine if there is a reality problem, a perception problem, or a combination of both; once this is determined, a decision of how to overcome these issues must be made
  • It is critical for the success of a brand that all internal stakeholders are a part of and believe in the building process. This means people at all levels, from senior management through to every employee and volunteer, must live the “brand promise,” this is done by integrating the brand promise into your organization’s culture. Having representatives from all areas of your association included in the creation process of your brand strategy is a way to further ensure buy-in from your internal folks.
  • What name, slogan, logo and colours will be associated with your brand? Will there be any consistent use of characters, music, signage or packaging as core elements of the brand?In choosing brand elements, a judicious approach will be most rewarding, one that will support decisions you have already made regarding brand purpose, target audience, brand identity, brand promise and brand positioning
  • Now that your organization has determined not only in what direction you need to go, but how to get there, and what brand elements you’ll use in your strategy, the next stage is to integrate the strategy across all your communication channels and points of contact. Brand conveys meaning and emotion about your organization and its offerings, therefore everyone who works on anything related to the brand and every physical or electronic element involved must support and integrate with the branding effort
  • Below Is a diagram showing all the elements of your organization that need to be aligned and integrated into your brand strategy in order to create true brand equity.
  • External stakeholders and clients ultimately decide if your brand will succeed or fail. A problem often faced by long standing organizations when implementing a brand strategy with the aim to change from old to new is that the disassociation from the old brand is difficult to make happen. Ensuring that your external stakeholders understand the new brand promise and that the new brand means an improved relationship with your organization is very important to getting them to buy-in to the process.
  • Pretest as much as possible; this will help your organization understand where it sits in the minds of target audiences. This not only allows you to gauge if your efforts are taking your organization where you want to go, but also highlights any changes or adjustments that may need to be made. Engaging key stakeholders and members of your key audiences is useful and necessary in this stage because they are the ones who can tell you if your organization is likely to succeed
  • After selecting and designing brand elements, your branding tasks now enter a second phase, that of launching and managing this identity to ensure its intended outcome - a desired brand image. You will need passion for your brand in order to encourage its use and perseverance to take good care of it. This may involve a variety of research techniques; ideally to measure your brand image prior to your efforts by doing a pre and post. It will count on you having clearly identified your desired image, giving you a basis for measuring success.
  • Memorable- How easily will this brand element be recalled and recognized? Short and catchy names and phrases. Meaningful- Ideally, the brand element suggests something informative and relevant to the target audience, Likeable- How aesthetically appealing are the proposed brand elements, both visually and verbally? Transferable- Are you able to use the brand elements under consideration to introduce new products in the same or different categories? Adaptable- Consider how adaptable and updatable the brand elements will be in the future. This would be especially true when using characters as a core element of the brand, Protectable- Will you be able to legally protect the brand elements or are they so generic that “anyone” could use them. Can it be too easily copied or used inappropriately? Although it might at first seem flattering, it is important that names retain their trademark rights and not become generic, as Kleenex, Xerox, and Jell-O did in the private sector.
  • Involvement of Communications suppliers“Living the brand” at all “points of contact”Reward/incentive system tied to brand contribution Use research to demonstrate value proposition of branding to senior managementBenchmark strategies and ongoing tracking and evaluation Internal Communications IntranetEngage stakeholdersSituated in Marketing and communications functionBranding team from all functions
  • Senior Management Stewardship Visible leadership will drive consistent behaviour. Top managers must demonstrate that internal brand alignment is high priority through their own commitment to brand goals, values and behaviours. Through words, matching actions and the initiatives they support, senior managers can demonstrate that the whole organization is serious about keeping its brand promise.Involve staff at early stagesAligning Business and Brand Strategy Customer relationships fuel success. Success is achieved by ensuring product and service quality is consistent with your brand promise. Make new employees aware of the brand promise and values as soon as they join. Support client and stakeholder expectations through every interaction. Responsibility and AccountabilityMiddle managers are vital to delivering brand promise. Their role is to infuse their teams and their operations with practical commitment to living the brand. This protocol applies as much to ‘back office’ functions as customer service. In this way, the brand becomes the platform for focusing staff attention outwards, towards the client and member priorities. It often involves changes to processes, incentives, training and management style as much as communication.Ongoing Performance Measurement and FeedbackWhat gets measured gets done. A coherent brand evaluation program with milestones, progress measures and celebrations of success is vital for sustaining momentum of internal brand alignment.Regular client/member feedback helps to monitor the effectiveness of your brand delivery and serves two distinct and equally important purposes: it determines how successfully internal managers are translating business strategies into compelling value propositions, and it creates an employee feedback loop to assess customer acceptance of and satisfaction with the brand promise.
  • Excel in at least one area: Even if your association is small and poor, devote your limited resources to an area of performance at which you can excel. Your objective is to be better in this area than any of your competitors. Your USPBe realistic about your goalsStrategies before tactics and stick with your plan Hire people who reflect your brand & Now, whoever you hire, be sure to train them to present your brand the way you want and expect it to be presented.Make sure your marketing and communication plans support and reinforce the brandPut the brand in the driver’s seat. The brand should drive all communications, and be a carefully planned part of each communicationPromote your association and its brand. All. The. Time. Include your logo and, if you have one, your tag line, on everything. Your literature. Your website. Your business cards. Your collateral material. Your Email. Give your staff shirts with your logo embroidered on them. Encourage your members to put your logo on their websites, letterhead, etc. (Yes, give them guidance on how to use it and how not to use it.)
  • As you’ll see the next Webinar is happening on February 23 – Mark Buzan will present Maximizing your Public Relations and Earned Media Potential.This year-long series takes you through all the key subject areas to support your association in its marketing and communications and coach you to success.The investment structure has been designed to make it easy and affordable for you to take all 10 sessions and will include a certificate of completion to substantiate your new breadth of knowledge. If you want to take only one the cost is $95 and the next level of savings is 3 at $250.00, 5 for $395 or 10 for $695.We hope you’ll be joining us for many more Webinars.
  • ClaireOn behalf of Jim Mintz, thank you for taking the time to attend
  • Here is where you can find me.Claire couldn’t be here today, but she would appreciate receiving your feedback.

Cepsm webinar branding for associations-feb 8 2011_final Cepsm webinar branding for associations-feb 8 2011_final Presentation Transcript

  • Welcome – we’ll be right with you
    Webinar: Branding for Associations
    Duration: 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. EST
    While you are waiting…please call in:
    Audio Dial-In Number: 1-877-314-1234
    or 416-204-9641 (if you are 416 area code)
    Participant Code:2573722
    NOTE: We will mute all attendees until 2 pm or earlier at which time we will unmute the lines to take questions.
  • Welcome
    Audio Dial-In Number: 1-877-314-1234 or 416-204-9641 (if local to Toronto)
    Participant Code:2573722
    Webinar: Branding for Associations
    Duration: 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. EST
    Mute: You are on mute until 2:00 p.m.
    Q&A: Make note of your Questions
    Stay for 30 minutes of Q&A at 2:00 p.m.
  • www.cepsm.ca
    Association-Training
    www.actionstrategies.ca
    REGISTER NOW FOR TRAINING ALL YEAR-LONG:
    Determining the Value of Your Sponsorships & Partnership Assets [JUNE 22]
    TBD [AUG 16]
    Membership Marketing[SEPT 27]
    Improving Your Selling Skills [OCT 20]
    Taking a Marketing Approach to Government Relations and Advocacy[NOV 10]
    Implementing and Measuring Low Cost Marketing Campaigns [DEC 6]
  • Presenter
    Jim Mintz
    Managing Partner
    CEPSM
  • What we do
    product & service marketing
    policy & program marketing
    social media engagement
    social marketing
    sponsorship /partnerships
    organizational branding
    online strategy planning
  • Branding for Associations:
    Why it has become invaluable
    Presented By: Jim Mintz, Centre of Excellence for Public Sector Marketing
  • Marketing Quote
    “Branding is the most misunderstood
    concept in all of marketing.”
    Rob Frankel Branding Expert
    8
  • http://www.mikekujawski.ca/ftp/cepsm_branding_ebook.pdf
  • How does branding work?
    Brand is built on two levels:
    Mass level: through advertising, public relations, community involvement etc.
    Personal level: through client interactions
  • How does branding work?
    • It is much more than graphics and visuals.
    • Organizational attitudes and behaviours of employees commensurate with the brand values.
  • How does branding work?
    • Starts inside and moves outward.
    • Promises worthless without internal practices and attitudes.
    • Relationships are priority.
    • Commitment of every member of organization.
    • Shared passion.
  • How does branding work?
    • Building a strong brand takes time.
    • Understand needs, expectations, and experiences of target audiences.
    • Know your organization.
    • Branding doesn’t change what you do but how you do it.
    • Branding is connecting everything you do to an overall brand vision.
  • How does branding work?
    • It’s not about large budgets and major marketing efforts.
    • It’s about strategically communicating your brand to clients and stakeholders,
  • Benefits and positive impacts of adopting a branding approach
    Strategicplanning
    Employee
    performance
    management
    Resourceallocation
    Brand
    Hiring and
    retention
    Marketing
    communications
    Service
    delivery (sales and operations)
    Employee
    communications
  • Benefits and positive impacts of adopting a branding approach
    • Product offering may be an idea, a cause, or a service.
    • Helps make the intangible more tangible,
    • Helps associations move into new product lines.
  • Benefits and positive impacts of adopting a branding approach
    • Branding facilitates consensus building by engaging all members of your organization
    • There will be an increased level of involvement and buy-in to the entire branding process
  • How to Build your brand
    Most successful branding efforts start with the development of a sound strategy and plan that takes into account your association’s mandate, employee input, and client/member perceptions.
  • How to Build your brand
    Branding process features action plan.
    Validation of proposed direction with clients members & stakeholders.
    1-2 year implementation plan for communicating and supporting the brand.
    Impact of strategy needs to be monitored.
  • Step 1Determine brand’s present position and tHOSE of competitors
  • Step 2 Decide where to go and how to get there
  • Decide where to go and how to get there
    Preferredcharacter
    Desired state
    Personality
    The Gap
    Existing state
    Currentcharacter
    Benefits/Value
    Current value
    Preferred value
  • Step 3Get Buy-In from all Internal Stakeholders
  • Step 4Craft the necessary communications / Choose necessary brand elements
  • Step 5Integrate strategy across segments and media elements
  • BENEFITS
    STAKEHOLDERS
    OTHER
    GOVERNANCE/MANAGEMENT
    CLIENTS
    SERVICES
    HUMAN RESOURCES
    INTERNATIONAL
    COMMUNICATIONS CHANNELS
  • Step 6Get buy-in from all external stakeholders
  • Step 7Pre test
  • Step 8Monitoring and Brand maintenance
  • Six Major Factors to Guide Communications
    MEMORABLE
    Meaningful
    Likeable
    Transferable
    Adaptable
    Protectable
  • How to Achieve Success in Branding
    • Senior Management Stewardship
    • Aligning Business and Brand Strategy
    • Responsibility and Accountability
    • Ongoing Performance Measurement and Feedback
  • How to Achieve Success in Branding
    • Excel in one Area
    • Be Realistic
    • Strategy Before Tactics
    • Hire Right People
    • Ensure IMC Supports Brand
    • Put Brand in Driver’s Seat
    • Promote! Promote!
  • www.cepsm.ca
    Association-Training
    www.actionstrategies.ca
    REGISTER NOW FOR TRAINING ALL YEAR-LONG:
    Maximizing Your Public Relations and Earned Media Potential [FEB 23]
    Taking a Marketing Approach Towards Corporate Revenue Development [MAR 9]
    Social Media Marketing: Magnify your org’s online presence[APR 12]
    Social Marketing and Behaviour Change for Associations [MAY 12]
    Determining the Value of Your Sponsorships & Partnership Assets [JUNE 22]
    TBD [AUG 16]
    Membership Marketing[SEPT 27]
    Improving Your Selling Skills [OCT 20]
    Taking a Marketing Approach to Government Relations and Advocacy[NOV 10]
    Implementing and Measuring Low Cost Marketing Campaigns [DEC 6]
    Investment: Choose 1 for $95, 3 for $250, 5 for $395 or 10 for $695
  • Thanks for your time!
  • Where to find me…
     
    Jim Mintz, Managing Partner
    Centre of Excellence for Public Sector Marketing
    Ottawa. Toronto. Regina .Calgary
    613.731.9851 ext.18
    News Feed (rss): http://feeds.feedburner.com/cepsm
    CEPSM Website: www.publicsectormarketing.ca
    Twitter: www.twitter.com/jimmintz
    Subscribe to my blog: www.jimmintz.ca
    Feedback: Claire Mills, Vice-President, Professional Development Portfolio, CEPSM clairemills@cepsm.ca
                      
  • Questions?