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Open Access Collections Case Studies
Open Access Collections Case Studies
Open Access Collections Case Studies
Open Access Collections Case Studies
Open Access Collections Case Studies
Open Access Collections Case Studies
Open Access Collections Case Studies
Open Access Collections Case Studies
Open Access Collections Case Studies
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Open Access Collections Case Studies

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A brief presentation I gave recently for a Museum and Gallery Services Queensland (http://www.magsq.com.au/) event, highlighting some good examples of collecting institutions making innovative use of …

A brief presentation I gave recently for a Museum and Gallery Services Queensland (http://www.magsq.com.au/) event, highlighting some good examples of collecting institutions making innovative use of online technologies.

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  • The open access movement is in a better place than its ever been before, as far as gaining ‘mainstream’ acceptance and being adopted by large players There have, of late, been lots of official statements endorsing open access – from the OECD, from Venturous Australia etc
  • The open access movement is in a better place than its ever been before, as far as gaining ‘mainstream’ acceptance and being adopted by large players There have, of late, been lots of official statements endorsing open access – from the OECD, from Venturous Australia etc
  • Click and flick has turned out to be highly successful, with over 9,000 photos uploaded since January This may not seem like much on internet scale, but it’s a huge number for a library collection It’s also significantly raised the profile of the PictureAustralia collection, with the NLA reporting much higher usage, even during traditionally slow periods The NLA doesn’t have any statistics on how many people are using CC licences, but they say anecdotally that they think it is a large portion, or even the majority.
  • Click and flick has turned out to be highly successful, with over 9,000 photos uploaded since January This may not seem like much on internet scale, but it’s a huge number for a library collection It’s also significantly raised the profile of the PictureAustralia collection, with the NLA reporting much higher usage, even during traditionally slow periods The NLA doesn’t have any statistics on how many people are using CC licences, but they say anecdotally that they think it is a large portion, or even the majority.
  • Click and flick has turned out to be highly successful, with over 9,000 photos uploaded since January This may not seem like much on internet scale, but it’s a huge number for a library collection It’s also significantly raised the profile of the PictureAustralia collection, with the NLA reporting much higher usage, even during traditionally slow periods The NLA doesn’t have any statistics on how many people are using CC licences, but they say anecdotally that they think it is a large portion, or even the majority.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Open Access Collections: some case studies Jessica Coates Creative Commons Clinic October 2009 CRICOS No. 00213J Carpeted commons by Glutnix, http://www.flickr.com/photos/glutnix/2079709803/in/pool-ccswagcontest07 available under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 licence, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en
    • 2. Powerhouse Museum CRICOS No. 00213J
      • released 1500 public domain photographs to Flickr Commons
      • ‘ Play’ worksheets available under CC BY-NC
      • encouraged CC for ‘photo of the day’
      • collection descriptions and data under CC
      Woman holding decorated bicycle, Phillips Glass Plate Negative Collection, Powerhouse Museum, www.powerhousemuseum.com/ collection/database/collection=Phillips_Glass_Plate_Negative
      • 20x increased visitation
      • crowd-sourced metadata
      • unexpected discoveries (eg locations)‏
      • partnerships (eg ABC)‏
      • reduced costs for Australian community and schools
      • didn’t hurt sales
      promotional + other benefits = net +ve $ Open Content Licensing and the Future of Collections, Paula Bray, http://www.archimuse.com/mw2009/papers/bray/bray.html
    • 3. Powerhouse Museum CRICOS No. 00213J Powerhouse Museum collection record http://www.powerhousemuseum.com/dmsblog/index.php/2009/04/27/another-opac-discovery-the-gambey-dip-circle-and-the-value-of-minimal-tombstone-data/ “ If your organisation is still having doubts about the value of making available un-edited, un-verified, ageing tombstone data then it is worth showing examples like these.” - Seb Chan
    • 4. Australian newspapers online
      • Launched by the NLA, with partners, Aug 2009
      • 547,430 pages and 6M articles available for full-text search
      AUSTRALIA part of the Creative Commons international initiative CRICOS No. 00213J Crowd-sourcing text corrections – 1,300 volunteers have corrected 3.4 million lines from 160,000 pages Courier Mail, Australian Newspapers, http://newspapers.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/page/24979
    • 5. Australian newspapers online AUSTRALIA part of the Creative Commons international initiative CRICOS No. 00213J http://newspapers.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/title/12
    • 6. Tropenmuseum
      • 312 photographs now on Wikicommons - for use in Wikipedia (4th most visited site on Internet)
      • avoided image copyright issues because volunteer photographers own material
      AUSTRALIA part of the Creative Commons international initiative
      • Museum of the tropics, Amsterdam
      • “ Wikipedia loves Art/NL” project - invited public to photograph collections and upload to Wikicommons
      Ingang Tropenmuseum by GerardM http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ingang_Tropenmuseum.jpg http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tropenmuseum
    • 7. Tropenmuseum AUSTRALIA part of the Creative Commons international initiative It was an easy way to…engage new audiences…[and] spread the stories from the collection…In the end I think more people will visit the museum and look online. – Susanne Ton, Manager of Multimedia Production, Tropenmuseum http://www.youtube.com/user/wikimedianl#play/all/uploads-all/0/4aPatvL5kvo Images being used in articles and seen by audiences that have no connection to museum – with link back http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tropenmuseum http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_karbala http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Iran_Battle_of_Karbala_19th_century.jpg
    • 8. Click and Flick
      • individuals to contribute to PictureAustralia by adding to Flickr groups
      • encourages CC licensing
      • 55,000 photos contributed since 2006
      • Now 100 remixes through Re-Picture Australia project
      AUSTRALIA part of the Creative Commons international initiative Y.A.P.O.M.A.S. by :/ www.flickr.com/photos/angelltsang/30211494/ The Argyle Stairs 1930 to 2008 by Rossco http://www.flickr.com/photos/45144498@N00/2510877137/ Something about the dog on the tuckerbox by Broken Simulacra http://www.flickr.com/photos/broken_simulacra/91355505/ Creative Commons licensing “encourages content contributors to think in terms of a librarian keeping in mind the public benefit of providing maximum access to content as part of Australia’s national collection.” – Fiona Hooton, Picture Australia http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Case_Studies/National_Library_of_Australia_%27Click_and_Flick%27
    • 9. Thanks
      • www.ip.qut.edu.au
      • creativecommons.org
      • wiki.creativecommons.org/casestudies
      • creativecommons.org.au
      • info@creativecommons.org.au
      CRICOS No. 00213J This slide show is licensed under a Creative Commons Australia Attribution licence. For more information see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/au/. Images in the slideshow are licensed as marked. Please remove any images that are not licensed appropriately for your use. Carpeted commons by Glutnix, http://www.flickr.com/photos/glutnix/2079709803/in/pool-ccswagcontest07 available under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 licence, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en

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