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Using Plays to Teach ESL

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You can use plays at the beginning level as a great way to integrate language skills. It's a fun way to develop vocabulary, apply reading skills and strategies, increase confidence, and get the whole ...

You can use plays at the beginning level as a great way to integrate language skills. It's a fun way to develop vocabulary, apply reading skills and strategies, increase confidence, and get the whole class engaged.

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  • Help get beginning level adult learners to get students engaged, build their vocabulary, increase their confidence in using English, and support them in developing critical thinking skills. The presenter will share activities and materials, including student samples
  • In 2008 decided to establish SKILLS WORKSHOP at the beginning level; it meets 5 hours per week, it is pass fail. Teachers want to work on: VOCAB, MODELS, Reinforce content; PRACTICE ALL SKILLS Students want: ALSO vocab and models, but they ask for more CORRECTION, SPEAKING practice, CONTROL over their own learning
  • Develop vocabulary Apply reading skills and strategies Make read-aloud activities enjoyable Keep class active and entertaining Vocab. is RECYCLED; meaning is reinforced through action; // Apply Reading skills; Previewing, guessing word meaning from context; making predictions; drawing inferences // USE read-aloud activities; reinforce sight-word recognition; build symbol to sound correlation
  • AUDIENCE OPENS TO SCENE 1
  • Pre-reading: key vocabulary like PLAY, CHARACTER, SCENE; Previewing: HOW MANY CHARACTERS?; Teacher reads first section aloud, comprehension check
  • VOCAB: Most new words introduced in the first part of the story, the later part is a chance to REPEAT, REPEAT, REPEAT, and to use the words in new contexts.
  • BRING THE STORY AND CHARACTERS TO LIFE; empower students, put them at the center of activity; practice imperatives; associate words and actions; demonstrate comprehension; invite peers to attend
  • Narrators, stage “curtain,” props that students collect. The props can become a character In the scene, but they didn’t want to go without
  • Develop related materials and prompts; bring relevant vocabulary into other class activities; give writing and speaking prompts based on the play
  • SO MUCH GROUP WORK; HERE’S AN ASSESSMENT TOOL for INDIVIDUALS
  • Every student wants to know what is the end of the story; Read and speak and write all the words and I can’t forget them; I learn the vocabulary because I want to know the story what is happen and what is happen next, so I have to know the vocabulary; Good topic because it’s a big problem to copy exam papers in the U.S. and all the world.
  • Help get beginning level adult learners to get students engaged, build their vocabulary, increase their confidence in using English, and support them in developing critical thinking skills. The presenter will share activities and materials, including student samples

Using Plays to Teach ESL Using Plays to Teach ESL Presentation Transcript

  • Using Plays to Teach All Skills Jessica Montgomerie University of Denver
  • - 5 levels plus GPP - Basic offered occasionally - 10 week term, 25 class hours per week
  • The Play’s the Thing!
  • Sherlock Holmes: Two Plays
    • Oxford University Press
    • Leveled reader Stage 1
    • Two one act plays
  • Introducing Scene 1
    • Pre-reading activities
    • Students read silently
    • Comprehension check
    • Students read aloud in small groups
  • Which words from Scenes 1-4 did you find again in Scenes 5 and 6? examination, worried, suddenly, gentlemen New vocabulary words: doorway, visitors, often
    • When do you feel worried?
      • Same like him, I feel worried for an examination because I want to
      • memorize all of the information .
  • Continuing the Play
    • Students think and discuss
      • predict what action will follow
      • describe characters
      • share opinions on characters’ choices
  • 2. Who was the new character in Scene 5? The new character in Scene 5 was McLaren. 3. What did he do? He told the gentlemen go away! He was unpolite and angry. 4. What do you think about his actions? I think he must respect for professor and detective. May be he doesn’t speak because did some bad thing. May be he took the exam papers.
  • Action!
  •  
  • Write a new ending for the play. What happened after Holmes and Watson left the college? What did Bannister and Gilchrist say to each other? What will they do next?
    • Holmes : ( taking Gilchrist to jail ) Don’t try that again. Bannister, I know you are loyal for Gilchrist family, but you should give him advise.
    • Bannister : I’m sorry Mr. Holmes. I won’t do that again.
    • Watson : ( looking Holmes ) This is an interesting story, you can write the story and send it to the newspaper.
    • Soames : Thank you Mr. Holmes and Watson for help me.
    • Holmes : You’re welcome. This is my job.
  • Writing Activity / Test
    • Choose a character and write a paragraph
    • about him. Tell me:
    • What is his job? His nationality?
    • What is he like? (clever, hardworking, polite, honest)
    • What does he do in the story?
    • Why is he an interesting person?
    • Characters:
    • Daulat Ras Dr. Watson Gilchrist Bannister
    • Sherlock Holmes Hilton Soames Miles McLaren
  •   Week 9 of 10   Week 7 of 10   Weeks 1- 5 of 10   Review the whole story; assess   Scenes 3-5; vocabulary   Skill-building Practice and perform the play   Scenes 6-8; write a scene   Begin the play; Scenes 1-2   Week 10 of 10   Week 8 of 10   Week 6 of 10  
  •  
  • [email_address] Slideshow and handouts: http://slideshare.com