Theme 7 Part1 By Jessica Jefferson
Chapter 13. Revolutions. Dominion. <ul><li>New King James II wanted obedience from New England. He demanded that Massachus...
Chapter 13. Revolutions. Men and Money. <ul><li>William of Orange overthrew James II and plunged England into war with Fra...
Chapter 14. The Atlantic. News. <ul><li>The flow of transatlantic information was improved by increased volume and predict...
Chapter 15. Awakenings. Growth and Limits. <ul><li>In 1750 there were 1,500 congregations; two thirds of adults were “chur...
Chapter 17. The Great Plains. Genizaros. <ul><li>17 th  Centaury: The Pueblo people were commandeered by the Spanish empir...
Chapter 17. The Great Plains. The Bourbon Reforms. <ul><li>1770-1780 New Mexico was rescued by Spain officials for the Bou...
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Theme 7 part 1

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Theme 7 part 1

  1. 1. Theme 7 Part1 By Jessica Jefferson
  2. 2. Chapter 13. Revolutions. Dominion. <ul><li>New King James II wanted obedience from New England. He demanded that Massachusetts accept new charter with major concessions to royal authority without success. </li></ul><ul><li>1684: James II created the Dominion of New England by consolidating the 8 northern colonies and demanded unprecedented levels of taxation. Deputy Governor Andros also challenged existing land titles. </li></ul><ul><li>Colonists were determined to have no Magna Carta rights, and Navigation Acts depressed port business. It was only in the spring of 1689 the news of upheaval in England presented opportunities. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Chapter 13. Revolutions. Men and Money. <ul><li>William of Orange overthrew James II and plunged England into war with France. The English needed a larger and more professional army and navy, and this would cost $$$. These changes forever expanded their infrastructure of a militarized government. </li></ul><ul><li>By 1694 the sustained army was 48,000 strong plus 21,000 mercenaries; which meant more taxes. </li></ul><ul><li>Taxes could not keep up with spending, and by 1698 the national debt reached $17 million. The Bank of England was created. From then on Parliament had to approve the crown’s proposed taxes. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Chapter 14. The Atlantic. News. <ul><li>The flow of transatlantic information was improved by increased volume and predictability of shipping. </li></ul><ul><li>This stimulated the development of the once forbidden colonial newspaper. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1704 the Boston News-Letter appeared, and by 1739 there were 13 British American news papers in seven seaports of seven colonies. </li></ul><ul><li>Colonial readers experienced an English perspective on the world. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Chapter 15. Awakenings. Growth and Limits. <ul><li>In 1750 there were 1,500 congregations; two thirds of adults were “churched.” </li></ul><ul><li>450 churches belonged to the largest denomination, the Congregationalists, almost all in New England. The second largest was the Anglicans, with 300 sustained parishes. The third were the Quakers, with 250 meetings. Church services provided social interaction and news from afar. </li></ul><ul><li>Despite these large numbers a declining number of men qualified for full church membership because they refused to share spiritual experiences, and an internal rift was forming between Evangelicals and Rationalists. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Chapter 17. The Great Plains. Genizaros. <ul><li>17 th Centaury: The Pueblo people were commandeered by the Spanish empire. The colony of New Mexico was founded. </li></ul><ul><li>Raids between the local nomads and Pueblo procured slaves, and nomads often sought revenge by killing and capturing both Hispanics and Pueblo. </li></ul><ul><li>Hispanics often purchased Indian Captives from the nomads for slavery. They believed these slaves were rescued from paganism and were know as Genizaros. </li></ul><ul><li>18 th Centaury: 10% of New Mexico’s population was made up by these Genizaros. After 1740, freed Genazaros formed communities that served as border guards against the Great Plains nomads. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Chapter 17. The Great Plains. The Bourbon Reforms. <ul><li>1770-1780 New Mexico was rescued by Spain officials for the Bourbon family who was influenced by the Enlightenment movement. They bolstered frontier defenses. </li></ul><ul><li>The reformers treated native peoples with respect, generosity, and cunning. </li></ul><ul><li>Under frontier reform De Croix increased the army to 2,800, and with the help of the Comanche and Navajo went up against the Apache. </li></ul><ul><li>By 1790 bands of the Apache were suing for peace and New Mexico began to prosper. Population reached 20,000 by 1800; doubling from a 9,600 in 1765. </li></ul>

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