• Like
Artemisia
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Artemisia

  • 455 views
Uploaded on

It is still difficult to believe such competent and successful female printer exist in the early 17th Century (the Baroque era). In the last month I have read a lot about her until such that I feel I …

It is still difficult to believe such competent and successful female printer exist in the early 17th Century (the Baroque era). In the last month I have read a lot about her until such that I feel I know the person and I can say something about her.
 
She was rape by her teacher at the age of 18. Because of that much had been written about her from the feminist point of view, which I think is a mistake. It really does her a dis-service and took away her artistic achievements. We should stick to facts and evidences rather than the speculations of how the her mental state. It is stupid to psychoanalyse someone who live centuries ago without basis.
 
There are several points that stood out about Artemisia
 
She was very successful, her patronage include the royalties of England, France and the Medici. She worked in many cities. She would be successful even by today’s standard.
Her paintings lack the ‘female’ touch. It is indeed difficult to tell from looking at the painting alone that they were painted by a woman.
Her attention to details and gestures shows that she was a thinking artist. This can be demonstrated by the two versions of Judith Slaying Hologernes.
She likes strong colours particularly golden yellow and beautiful dresses.
Her family relationship with her father and children were good.
She liked the company of men and had many lovers.
 
I think, her paintings were the equivalent of a fast action movie of today, full of movements and a bit of sex and violence on the side.

More in: Art & Photos
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
  • See you soon. Take care.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
  • It is good hear from everyone again. Sometimes I do wonder what is happening. These sort of painting Powerpoints take me about a month to do, collecting material, doing research and preparing the content. But I do enjoy doing. It helps me to understand. But the travel season is upon us. There are things to see and places to visit. So I shall not doing these painting Powerpoint for a while but I shall be doing the less demanding one.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
  • Dear friends. It is nice to meet you again. Sometimes I even wonder what happen to you. Painting Powerpoint takes about a month to do, collecting material, reading and preparing. I also am very mindful of words, as time is precious. But how can you tell a story accurately without words? Now the travel season is upon us. There are things to see and places to go. I shall not be doing these painting Powerpoint for a while and do the occasional less demanding one.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
  • Superb Presentation, Congratulations Jerry and thanks so much.
    All the best.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
  • Superb,congratulations Jerry.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
455
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
23
Comments
8
Likes
10

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • I came across Artemisia years ago. It is still difficult to believe such competent and successful female printer exist in the early 17th Century (the Baroque era). In the last month I have read a lot about her until such that I feel I know the person and I can say something about her.
     
    She was rape by her teacher at the age of 18. Because of that much had been written about her from the feminist point of view, which I think is a mistake. It really does her a dis-service and took away her artistic achievements. We should stick to facts and evidences rather than the speculations of how the her mental state. It is stupid to psychoanalyse someone who live centuries ago without basis.
     
    There are several points that stood out about Artemisia
     
    She was very successful, her patronage include the royalties of England, France and the Medici. She worked in many cities. She would be successful even by today’s standard.
    Her paintings lack the ‘female’ touch. It is indeed difficult to tell from looking at the painting alone that they were painted by a woman.
    Her attention to details and gestures shows that she was a thinking artist. This can be demonstrated by the two versions of Judith Slaying Hologernes.
    She likes strong colours particularly golden yellow and beautiful dresses.
    Her family relationship with her father and children were good.
    She liked the company of men and had many lovers.
     
    I think, her paintings were the equivalent of a fast action movie of today, full of movements and a bit of sex and violence on the side. She did not started a new trend. Caravaggio did.
     
  • Reference – “The Lomi Gentileschi” : A Family of Tuscan Artists Rising to the International Scenarios by Roberto Paolo Cioridi published in 2011 in the book Artemisia Gentileschi, published by 24 Ore Cultura.
  • Reference – “The Lomi Gentileschi” : A Family of Tuscan Artists Rising to the International Scenarios by Roberto Paolo Cioridi published in 2011 in the book Artemisia Gentileschi, published by 24 Ore Cultura.
  • Reference – “The Lomi Gentileschi” : A Family of Tuscan Artists Rising to the International Scenarios by Roberto Paolo Cioridi published in 2011 in the book Artemisia Gentileschi, published by 24 Ore Cultura.
  • Reference – Wikipedia on Artemisia Gentileschi.
  • Reference – Wikipedia on Artemisia Gentileschi. Roberto Contini, Artemisia Gentileschi, published by 24 Ore Cultara 2011.
  • Ref Bissell, Ward R. Artemisia Gentileschi and the Authority of Art. Penn State Press. 2011.

Transcript

  • 1. First created 18 July 2014. Version 1.0 - 28 Aug 2011. Jerry Tse. London. Artemisia Gentileschi All rights reserved. Rights belong to their respective owners. Available free for non-commercial , educational and personal use. The Most Acclaimed Female Painter 1593-1653 “The only woman in Italy who ever knew about painting, colour, impasto and other essentials” Reberto Longhi, an Italian art historian. 1916.
  • 2. Caravaggio Caravaggio is an extraordinary painter with an equally controversial life. He was a violent man by nature and a known killer. During the end of the 16C and the beginning of the 17C. Caravaggio was the most influential artist of Italy, as well as Europe. “Caravaggio’s innovation was a radical naturalism that combined close physical observation with a dramatic, even theatrical, use of chiaorscuro …, the shifting from light to dark with little intermediate value [strong contrast]” Wikipedia. Typically his paintings have a black background with a strong directional light source. Violence, naturalism and chiaoscuro are the three main features of Caravaggio. Portrait of Caravaggio (Detail) by Ottavio Leoni. Head of Medusa. c1598. Head of Goliath. 1609.Head of Goliath. 1607Head of Holofernes. c1598. 1572-1610
  • 3. Caravaggio
  • 4. One of Caravaggio’s favourite biblical subject is the beheading of Holofernes by Judith. c1598. Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Rome. Caravaggio
  • 5. Artists who followed Caravaggio are called Caravaggisti. Here are a few of them who were influenced by his styles and subject matters.
  • 6. Portrait of Artemisia A portrait of Artemisia at work painted by her friend, the well-known Simon Vouet, also a Caravaggisti. It showed Artemisia at thirty something. Artemisia Gentileschi, also known as Artemisia Lomi was a successful professional female artist in the history of European painting. She received commissions from the kings of France, Spain, England and the patronage of the Medici. She was in good relations with most famous painters of her days and accepted into the Florence professional artist guild. She was born into an artist family. Her father, Orazio was also a painter and a Caravaggisti. She lost her mother at the age of 12 and was taught by her father how to paint.
  • 7. Artemisia came from a long line of artists. Her father Orazio and her were successful professional artists.
  • 8. The Lomi Brothers - Baccio Baccio Lomi was the least talented. He spent most of his time as working to other master painters, who assigned him to copy others work. He painted mostly religious subjects.
  • 9. The Lomi Brothers - Aurelio Aurelio Lomi, Artemisia’s uncle was more successful and has been given the title “maestro”. He even had a workshop. He was commissioned to produce paintings for several churches, mainly in Tuscany. He had offices in Florence, Pisa and Genoa. His standing in Florence was probably instrumental for admission of Artemisia into the Accademia di Arte del Disegno, The first professional woman painter accepted by the academy.
  • 10. The Lomi Brothers - Orazio Orazio Gentileschi, Artemisia’s father was a successful artists. He was trained by his brother Aurelio. They also worked together in commissions. He adopted the Caravaggio’s style after 1600. He repainted many of Caravaggio’s subjects. Among the three Lomi brothers Orazio was possibly the best. Apart from his success in Rome, he also worked in the court of the grand duke of Pisa, the French court and the English court.
  • 11. The Lomi Brothers - Orazio
  • 12. The Lomi Brothers - Orazio Orazio Gentileschi had a very close relationship with his daughter Artemisia. They worked in many commissions together and their styles were similar. Like many artists of his day, he often painted subjects by Caravaggio, like Judith and Holofernes.
  • 13. Major periods in Artemisia’s life and her paintings. It is important to note that there are considerable differences on the dating of Artemisia’s paintings, by different scholars.
  • 14. Rome 1593 - 1614 The “earliest Roman period represent some of the most daring undertakings of her artistic life.” Judith W Mann.
  • 15. On the right is the earliest painting by Artemisia. There may have been other paintings that she painted part of the canvas before. This was painted the same time as her father’s version (above). She painted this at the young age of 15-16. Even at this age her painting skill was competent and showing great promise of a career in art. Her father’s version painted in 1609 and Artemisia’s version 1608-09. Early Rome Period
  • 16. Early Rome Period This is an exceptional painting (left) of its time. Artemisia painted this at the age of 17. Unlike other paintings on Susanna and the Elders, Artemisia showed a distressed Susanna being pestered by the Elders as she twisted her body away and put up her hands in a defensive gesture. This compares with the usual depiction of Susanna, like the painting by Tintoretto above, with a display of her nakedness. Artemisia signed the painting, which probably intended as an introduction to potential clients. She was probably thinking of a professional career in art.
  • 17. The Rape Artemisia was studying under Agostino Tassi, who worked with Orazio on the ceiling fresco of Palazzo Pallaincini Rospigliosi. Tassi raped Artemisia (May 1611) and nine months later Orazio accused Tassi of rape and stole a painting from him. During the trial Artemisia was subjected to thumbscrew torture to verify her testimony. Later Tassi was found guilty and was sentenced to imprisonment for a year. In 1612, a month later after the trial, Orazio arranged his daughter to marry the Florentine artist, Pierantonio Stiattesi. Artemisia’s works were a continuation of the Caravaggisti movement. She lived a fairly normal life, as a first class professional artist, well connected with some of the best artists of her days, as well as a good daughter and as a good mother. Many people have speculated how the rape had affected Artemisia’s paintings. Such event must had an effect on Artemisia but there were neither document of how she felt nor any observation of her mental state by others. Artemisia?
  • 18. Early Rome Period This was a life-size painting. It was quite an undertaking for an 18 year old girl.
  • 19. Rome 1593 - 1614 This is Danae a copy of the Cleopatra painting on a much smaller canvas.
  • 20. Orazio c1621 Orazio’s version of Danae many years later.
  • 21. Rome 1593 - 1614 This is believed to be the first version of Artemisia’s Judith and Hologernes (right). The most striking aspect of the painting is the realism of the violence. Comparing this with Caravaggio’s version (above), painted a decade ago, Artemisia’s version was a more creditable reconstruction, showing the two women struggling to overpower Holofernes, deep in the act of cut his head off. It is the most violence image of the Judith’s story. It was painted during Artemisia’s rape trial.
  • 22. Major periods in Artemisia’s life and her paintings. It is important to note that there are considerable differences on the dating of Artemisia’s paintings, by different scholars.
  • 23. Florence 1614 - 1620 Artemisia had a huge success in Florence and launched herself as a professional artist and her reputation was rising fast.
  • 24. Florence 1614 - 1620 Artemisia had a huge success in Florence and launched herself as a professional artist and her reputation was rising fast. It was her most productive period. Shortly after her marriage, Artemisia moved to Florence with her husband. In 1618 she gave birth to a daughter and a few years after a second daughter was born. Artemisia taught both of her daughters to paint. She won her first solo commission for the Casa Buonarroti (left). She also enjoyed the patronage of the Medici family. Importantly she was accepted into the Accademia delle Arti del Disegno, the professional artist guild. She was the first female member. She also maintained good relations with the most respected artists of her time. She arrived in Florence at the age of 21 and return to Rome at the age 27. Florence 1614 - 1620
  • 25. Florence 1614 - 1620 This was painted not long after her arrival in Florence. Artemisia gave birth to four children in Florence. Only one survived to adulthood.
  • 26. Florence 1614 - 1620 Artemisia at the age of 24. She played the lute and well verse in music. Painted about the same time she had her first child.
  • 27. Florence 1614 - 1620 Artemisia liked strong colours for costumes (red, blue and yellow). This picture was probably commissioned by the Medici as the back of the chair was covered with pattern of the Medici balls, an emblem of the House of Medici.
  • 28. Florence 1614 - 1620 Artemisia was skilful in painting the texture of fabrics, as by the Maidservant head scarf. Also note beautiful gilt woven dress, the hair clasp, the teardrop pearl earrings, the carved handle of the sword. It is difficult to see the female touch in Artemisia’s painting. The only clue if any, is her depiction of the costumes and jewels, which Artemisia was fond of in real life.
  • 29. Major periods in Artemisia’s life and her paintings. It is important to note that there are considerable differences on the dating of Artemisia’s paintings, by different scholars.
  • 30. Rome 1620 - 1627
  • 31. Rome 1620 - 1627 Artemisia left Florence on 11 February 1620. In spite of her professional success, she was pursued by creditors. Finally she returned to Rome without her husband. Financially, Rome was not so lucrative. She began painting a series of portraits, clearly showed her ability in portraiture.
  • 32. Rome 1620 - 1627 The is the second version of Judith beheading Holofernes, in the Uffizi. It is a slightly larger version. This was probably painted for Cosimo II de Medici. Artemisia often made replica of her paintings for her patrons. She also submitted drawings to potential patrons. On occasion her drawings were plagiarized by other minor painters. As this was her second attempt, Artemisia was able to make some improvements to the painting, apart from the obvious differences in clothing and colour. The expressions on the two women were slightly difference and the pressing of the sword’s handle on the flesh of Holefernes’ arm.
  • 33. Comparison of the two Judiths Note the Judith on the right with the blood stains on her beast & the dress; her apprehensive expression; her bracket; her torso clearly visible. Some of the differences maybe due to the poorer condition of the painting on the left.
  • 34. Rome 1620 - 1627 Portrait of Caterina Savelli? Magnificant dress.
  • 35. Rome 1620 - 1627 Another biblical heroine on the killing of Sisera. Naples 1630 - 1638
  • 36. Rome 1620 - 1627 Pietro Gentile as a Gonfaloniere or standard bearer of the papal state.
  • 37. Rome 1620 - 1627 A more passive version of Susanna and the Elder, now at Burghley House. The passiveness is very unusual for Artemisia’s heroine. This call into question the authenticity of the painting. X-ray examination suggested the left side of the painting had been re-worked.
  • 38. Rome 1620 - 1627 Three versions of this painting exist. This is the oldest. This is the one in Detroit. This showed Judith and her Maidservant checking to ensure nobody saw them leaving the camp with the severed head of Holofernes. The painting was illuminated by a single candle, with Judith holding up her hand to block the glaring light.
  • 39. Rome 1620 - 1627 A probable portrait of the military engineer of Antoine de Ville.
  • 40. Rome 1620 - 1627 In 1627 Artemisia moved to Venice. Dating her paintings in this period is problematic, without certainty. It is thought that this was painted by Artemisia when she was in Venice.
  • 41. Major periods in Artemisia’s life and her paintings. It is important to note that there are considerable differences on the dating of Artemisia’s paintings, by different scholars.
  • 42. Naples 1630 – 38 / 1642 - 1656
  • 43. Naples 1630 – 38 / 1642 - 1656 In 1630 Artemisia moved again, this time to Naples. Apart from her 4-years stay in London, reunited with his father, Orazio, she lived in Naples for the rest of her life.
  • 44. Naples 1630 - 1638 Another biblical heroine, who saved the Jews, from the Persian King, in contempory costumes.
  • 45. Naples 1630 - 1638
  • 46. Naples 1630 - 1638 Another biblical story of Samson betrayed by Delilah.
  • 47. Naples 1630 - 1638
  • 48. Naples 1638 - 1642 This painting although attributed to Artemisia is not particularly appealing. The landscape background could well have painted by someone else.
  • 49. Naples 1642 - 1656 The story of Lucretia is part of the legend on the founding of the Roman Republic and it is not from the Bible. Lucretia was raped by the son of the tyrannical Etruscan King. She extracted an oath from her family members for a revenge before killing herself to protect her honour. An uprising followed and the Roman republic was born.
  • 50. Naples 1642 - 1656 Viewing Artemisia’s painting is like watching an action movie today. It always stirs up a sense of excitements, packed with moving actions and accompanied by the occasional sexy scenes. This later version of the painting is now in Naples. It was painted some 20 years after the Detroit version. A slightly smaller third version of this painting is now in Cannes, France.
  • 51. Naples 1642 - 1656 Meaningful gestures, attention to details, realistic observations packaged in chiaroscuro.
  • 52. Naples 1642 - 1656 A late painting by Artemisia, still using strong colours in her paintings.
  • 53. London 1638 – 1642
  • 54. It is difficult to see the female style in Artemisia’s paintings. If anything her paintings are more masculine than most. After all she had created the most violence images of Judith beheading Holofernes ever. However, there is a give away. Of the 50 or so paintings attributed to Artemisia, many of these paintings depicted strong female characters like Esther, Judith, Salome and Jael. These are extra-ordinary women of courage and determination. (Artemisia never painted the severed head of Goliath a popular painting subject but he was killed by a man, David). These women saw themselves as capable as any man, perhaps that was also how Artemisia saw it as well. On the left is the only painting that we are certain that Artemisia painted during her time in London, (apart from the part of the ceiling she painted at Marlborough House). It is a very unusual self portrait looking from above. London 1638 - 1642
  • 55. Artemisia contemporaries In Europe, we saw prosperity shifting from the south toward the northern European countries. With it, we saw the rise of the Dutch Golden Age.
  • 56. The rise of the Dutch Golden Age & paintings in England. In the second half of the 17th Century, Spain declined. France rose to become the greatest power in Continental Europe. The economic centre of Europe had shifted northward from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic. Two of the countries benefited from this trend were England and Holland. Arts always follows where the money goes. During this period we saw the rise of the Dutch paintings. In England we saw the arrival of Holbein the Younger, Van Dyck, Rubens, Orazio Gentileschi and Artemisia.
  • 57. All rights reserved. Rights belong to their respective owners. Available free for non-commercial, Educational and personal use. Music – Ludovic Einaudi, Lady Jane Further readings - Artemisia Gentileschi published by 24 Ore Cultura by Roberto Contini and Franscsco Solinas, an exhibition catalogue. Also Wikipedia on Artemisia Gentileschi. The End Can you tell if it is written by a woman?