ICT Innovatie sessie Q4 2013
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ICT Innovatie sessie Q4 2013

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Innovatie sessie met bedrijf x - sparren over de toekomst.

Innovatie sessie met bedrijf x - sparren over de toekomst.

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  • Introduction
  • Agenda for this presentation
  • Agenda for this presentation
  • The Dutch economy experienced a sharp downturn in GDP over 2012, reporting negative growth rates throughout the year. Although the economy seemed to improve in 1H12, the remainder of the year was substantially weaker. However, the GDP forecast by the Dutch Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB) does not seem to get any better for 2013. The economy is expected to decline by another 0.5%.Nevertheless, IDC expects IT spending to grow 1.5% this year because the Netherlands is still an interesting market for the ICT industry. Take, for example, the local IT infrastructure — Dutch organizations are connected to one of the best broadband networks in the world, one that holds the world's biggest Internet hub, namely the AMS-IX. In addition, approximately 90% of the Dutch population has access to the Internet, and according to Ookla's Net Index, the Netherlands has the ninth fastest Internet connection in the world, with average household download speeds that reach up to almost 30Mbps. This well-developed IT landscape is an important reason the Dutch host and operate a relatively large share of datacenters for the enterprise, consumer, and the international gaming industry. Therefore it is no surprise that beyond a number of tax incentives, the Netherlands provides an attractive market for many large organizations (e.g., Google) for the accommodation of a wide range of IT services. Consequently, there is no denying that ICT and the Internet will be crucial for the future growth opportunities of the Dutch economy.As the uncertain economic outlook in Europe continues to impact the Netherlands, businesses will be cautious when considering their ICT spending for 2013. At the same time, Henk Kamp, the Dutch Minister for Economic Affairs, says that businesses in the Netherlands will need to continue to invest in IT innovations to sustain its competitive advantage and remain attractive for foreign investors. So as the need for growth and innovation remains, it will be the 3rd Platform for IT growth and innovation where the most important events will cluster. Around this platform — which is built on mobility, cloud services, social technologies, and Big Data — we will see greater urgency in investment as IT markets shift beyond the exploration stage to full competition. We have already witnessed these events in several markets, one of which was during the Dutch government's auction of 4G/LTE frequencies, which outperformed initial auction expectations by raising €3.8 billion. The ability in the Netherlands to compete on this 3rd Platform will reset leadership rankings within the IT markets and for every industry that uses IT.
  • France just completed a survey – not quite as gloomy as expected = potentially 0.5% adjustment upwards. In the midst of finalizing and reconciling the 2H12.
  • Prediction #1: Dutch IT spending will be slow but boosted by mobilityEconomically, there is negative GDP growth projected in the Netherlands through 2013 (-0.5%), but IDC expects some growth in technology spending. IDC forecasts that the Dutch ICT market will continue to grow slowly, increasing only 1.5% in 2013 from 2012. Spending will reach €31.6 billion in 2013 and continue to grow to €33.5 billion by 2016 at a CAGR of 2.2%. However, this low overall growth hides the story of profound change that the market is witnessing. Although many technology markets experience a steady YoY decline, at the same time we see technologies influenced by the 3rd Platform creating a balancing effect with double-digit growth rates.Many of the traditional hardware markets have been experiencing a serious decline, and this is expected to continue in 2013. The Dutch PC market will decline 3.1% as both consumers and businesses become more mobile oriented. Spending on storage will decline a further 9.5% as cloud solutions become more prevalent, and sales of traditional feature phones will decline 25.1% as smartphones take over the mobile market.Double-digit YoY growth from technologies that support the 3rd Platform, particularly mobile-related technologies, are balancing the impact of these declines. IDC is forecasting the tablet market to grow 20.6% in 2013 and wireless data to increase by 11.6%. By the end of 2013, the smartphone market will get close to accounting for half the value of the Dutch client device market (desktop, notebook, tablets, smartphones, and feature phones) and is forecast to reach €1.9 billion in sales.
  • Agenda for this presentation
  • In IDC's 2008 global top 10 predictions, we noted that the ICT industry was just at the very beginning of what we termed a "hyperdisruption" — a "once in every 20–25 years" shift to a new technology platform for growth and innovation. In IDC's 2011 top 10 predictions, we named this postdisruption IT world the 3rd Platform. By 2020, when the ICT industry is expected to generate $5 trillion in global spending, over $1.3 trillion more than it does today, 40% of the industry's revenue and — incredibly — 98% of its growth will be driven by 3rd Platform technologies that today represent just 22% of ICT spending.
  • Prediction #6: Dutch shopkeepers will embrace omnichannel retailing strategiesIt has been a challenging year for retailers in the Netherlands, especially with the competition from etailers and emarketplaces. IDC expects this to intensify in 2013 as it is now easy for existing and new retailers to set up online stores, and given the increasing confidence in online payment methods and buyer awareness of various retail channels. Also, when considering the taxes paid for owning store space, the depreciation of property, and increasing transportation costs, it is not surprising that profit margins for traditional retailers are decreasing.To ease the competition from ecommerce players, IDC believes that traditional retailers in the Netherlands will use mobile applications in 2013 (i.e., applications that are driven by omnichannel retailing strategies). Merging the multichannels (e.g., social media, smartphones, and digital signage) through social local mobile (SoLoMo) applications enables customers to experience a more personalized shopping experience. IDC expects that with this niche, ICT vendors in the Netherlands have plenty of opportunities to help retailers move to the next level in mobile applications to, for example, ensure improved interaction with clients and their personal cloud of friends.Retailers have been complaining about the "showrooming" trend as this is eroding their sales. There is a growing number of consumers that go to retail stores to test certain products (e.g., cameras at Media Markt, Expert, or BCC) and then go online to a different store (e.g., Bol.com, Wehkamp.nl, Zalando.nl) to buy the products at a cheaper price. To avoid this "browse but buy somewhere else" behavior, we believe it is essential that retailers deploy Big Data technologies to help formulate effective customer insights and business intelligence that will help generate in-store sales through personalized loyalty programs, all part of the omnichannel strategy.Internet word-of-mouth marketing will drive revenue once there is an integration of social network services in the actual store through mobile applications. For example, this can be achieved by a post on Facebook about the specific service offered in a bookshop in, say, Amsterdam. IDC believes retailers should encourage customers to be physically in the store to receive discounts and provide an opportunity to promote their shopping experience to the customer's connections on the social Web through the use of mobile applications. As part of the omnichannel strategy, by using custom-built mobile applications and mobile point-of-sales systems, employees in the retail industry (e.g., in-store salespeople) can be empowered with more accurate, timely, and customer-centric information (e.g., hobbies, dislikes, or last three purchases) to help guide the sales process and the overall customer assistance.
  • Agenda for this presentation
  • Most conversations about Big Data stop atthe three “V’s of volume, velocity and variety. What I want to tell you now is that the fourth “V” is actually most important. The fourth “V” is value. Value is how you distinguish between some traditional high performance computing environments and the new world of Big Data, whether it is linked to high performance computing or to more commercial use cases. In the world of big data, value is about time. Can I detect the pattern or find the answer in a short enough timeframe to change a process and have a material impact on a business outcome?
  • Agenda for this presentation
  • Businesses are under increasing pressure to find new ways of operating to meet changing user expectations and leverage available data and information for competitive advantage. As the impact of social workflow penetrates through organizations, it will become inextricably linked to where end users are getting work done and where business decisions are made. Enabling this social workflow doesn't mean a set of new applications but enhanced social capabilities that allow an organization to evaluate market factors, social outcomes, and social outputs that are driving business change.
  • Managing Social Business "Experiences"Meeting changing employee, customer and partner expectations is becoming a business imperative and with this, companies are assuming a more 'social' workflow. As competitive pressure rises, companies will look for innovative ways to meet and serve these needs as well as enhance operational and strategic decision making. The notion of 'experience' highlights how social business initiatives are maturing and coming together around three main categories, customer experience management, employee experience management and partner experience management. Each category holds a set of social workflow impacts from both a user process and technology perspective. Socialytics can be applied across experience scenarios and enterprise social networks to measure the influence of social processes on customer, content and network behavior.Customer Experience ManagementCustomer experience management refers to the entire process relating to the interactions between a customer and the organization whom they engage with over the lifetime of the relationship. It includes the orchestration of internal business processes to create a flow that is planned and architected in a manner that makes the interaction from the customer's side as easy, quick, transparent, positive, and full featured as possible through any customer journey. As such it requires a complete internal and external enterprise wide, understanding of any and all direct and indirect contributors to the customers' experience. The main impacts of customer experience management include:Engaging customer communities in an ongoing conversationEvolving customer service into the new marketingEngaging 'when, where and how' the customer choosesPartner Experience ManagementPartner Experience Management refers orchestration of interactions partners and suppliers have with other businesses (B2B) to deliver optimized workflow. Existing supplier and partner networks are encompassed by partner experience management where interactions take on socially driven workflow or give feedback on processes that transcend multiple networks.Digital Commerce Digital commerce is the connection of the buyer, both business and consumer, to the front office or retail store where buying is done to the back office where products and services are created and business activities are managed. The main impacts of digital commerce are:Omni-channelConnecting the people who make, account for, and sell products and services with those who buy themLeveraging purchasing patterns, pricing history, buyer behavior, and other data to offer the products the buyer wants when, where, and at the price they want to payEmployee Experience ManagementEmployee Experience Management refers to the interactions of employees with across the lifetime of the relationship. It includes the orchestration of internal business processes to create a flow that is planned and architected in a manner that makes the interaction from the employee or job candidate’s side as easy, quick, transparent, positive, and full featured as possible throughout the employment journey. Social Talent ManagementThe application of social technology to talent management provides for both top down and peer-to-peer visibility and more targeted communication. The outcome is a more knowledgeable and connected workforce:More meaningful performance appraisals informed by peer feedbackKnowledge sharing improves enterprise performanceIdentification of key talentTargeted searches for new talent
  • Prediction #4: Social marketing will reach paradigm shiftIDC believes that the paradigm shift in social media observed in 2012 will render a strong increase of spending directed at social engagements in 2013. Dutch organizations are starting to understand that sophisticated tools that aggregate data pulled from social media can deliver significant insights into specific online brand communities. Throw in a few dashboards to quantify the corporate benefits in terms of cost reductions and sales increments, and social media will be another hot topic for marketing executives for optimizing marketing budgets.Last year, IDC conducted a European Social Business Survey and found that the Netherlands is one of the most mature social media markets in Europe after Germany and the Nordics. The high penetration of Internet users in Twitter, LinkedIn, Hyves, and Facebook would suggest that the Netherlands is a very competitive market for enterprises to engage in through social media. However, IDC's Social Business in the Netherlands, 2012 (IDC #NITS77U, August 2012) shows that the full awareness of social media risks and benefits has come, compared with other European countries, relatively late for many Dutch organizations.In 2011, most organizations in the Netherlands were primarily neutral toward the benefits that come with social media and agreed that there were various risks involved in participating in this social landscape. A year later, IDC found that although some organizations have become more vigilant around defamation and security risks, marketing and feedback benefits were finally appreciated and scored highest in the survey. The responses show that Dutch organizations are becoming more aware of what the social Web has to offer. Hence, there appears to be an evident paradigm shift among organizations in terms of understanding social Web benefits, which will not only impact marketing spending but also how organizations communicate internally (see Prediction 5).Over 2013, those wishing to push major organizational change by leveraging the marketing power of the social Web will gain a competitive advantage in the Netherlands. New social media marketing technology tools and processes that go beyond typical marketing schemes are able to provide a fuller picture of the customer base. In optimizing a combination of social app development, creative designs, and data analytics for measuring brand engagements and ROI, the social web has become a valuable substitute for traditional advertising in the Netherlands.
  • Social is real time and in context..What happened when the lights went out? Oreo jumped on the change and followed up with a clever response that engaged users, it was timely and relevant.Twitter Mentioned In 50% Of Super Bowl Commercials
  • Prediction #5: Enterprise social collaboration will continue to be the fastest-growing software marketIDC predicts that enterprises in the Netherlands will be setting their sights on enabling more efficient processes and operations by offering new enterprise collaboration tools. Even in traditional office environments with standardized workspaces, organizations are trying to deliver tools for employees that help them work on shared projects in alignment with local and distant teams. Recent IDC surveys show that Dutch organizations are looking for ways to improve fundamental worker productivity and that collaboration software will be an important investment area to achieve these goals. IDC forecasts that collaboration software spending in the Netherlands will grow at a CAGR of 8.1% YoY in 2011–2016 to €115.7 million.As a result of the collaboration tools available to the consumer, IDC believes that organizations in the Netherlands will face strong internal demand for improved content sharing and creation abilities over 2013. In addition, the social Web is also spreading into businesses as it offers a new way to cooperate — it is not only limited to consumer cultures and marketing schemes. Enterprise social software offerings (e.g., Salesforce Chatter, Cisco WebEx Social, and IBM Connections) bring enhanced social collaboration capabilities to users who are either inside or outside an organization's firewall. Users who are in noncustomer-facing roles benefit most from these solutions, although customer-facing benefits are also very obvious. The variety of these Enterprise 2.0 deployment options (e.g., on-premises, software as a service or SaaS, hosted application management, or software appliance) available today offer suitable collaboration solutions for any organization that wants to meet the internal demand for social information sharing.By providing means for communications and fundamental worker productivity enhancements, collaborative software has become a fundamental factor for the modern organization. But with today's competitive environment, it has become more important to deliver a seamless collaboration experience to organizations. The rise in social media is challenging for enterprises to embrace even more innovative productivity tools in order to meet the new collaboration demands and remain competitive. Therefore IDC expects social enterprise software to lead this development and form the main solution to support the change in operational dynamics of the business. Consequently, we forecast this enterprise social software to be the fastest-growing software market in the Netherlands, with revenue growth of 34.4% in 2013.
  • Transparency of information is critical. The ability for end users to surface and intelligently filter information, with system help, from inside and outside the firewall.Westfield - 100 Shopping Centers, 4 ContinentsGift Card initiative - realtime - retailers and shoppers, saved 6 weeks - conversations conciergeWhen there was a design flaw involving the magnetic strips on some gift cards, Westfield learned of the issue—and addressed it—on Yammer. IBM – Blue Cross Blue shield MABlue Cross is the glue that connects members and providers. They keep a 360 view of their members to provide better care at less cost. They look at all the touch points in the process. Mobile was not a preferred mode of contact when the first laws in universal coverage were passed in 2006. There is now coverage for 411,000 uninsured residents and only 1.9% remain uninsured.  
  • Prediction #3: The Dutch telecom market will be data driven; overall revenue will remain flat in 2013The telecommunications market in the Netherlands will show a relatively flat development in 2013 as consumers and businesses are expected to spend a total of €11.1 billion on connectivity services. While more traditional services such as fixed voice, legacy data services, mobile voice, and messaging will continue to decline, growth segments such as IP voice, Ethernet, broadband, and mobile data are expected to grow to balance market development in 2013.The trend from a voice-driven to a data-driven industry will continue in 2013 across fixed and mobile. Ethernet services will be a key growth area in the fixed market. IDC sees that enterprises are increasingly adopting these services not only to help connect multiple sites to one another and to datacenters but also to help address their ever-growing bandwidth requirements. Demand for fixed broadband access will show only modest growth, though within this market, fiber to the premises (FTTP) will gain substantial ground, especially at the expense of DSL.The voice to data transition will be even more evident in the mobile space. While revenue for mobile voice services will decline by 8% YoY, revenue for mobile data services will show 12% growth. This specific market will be fueled by the growing number of smartphones, PC dongles, media tablet users, and other mobile-connected devices. In addition, demand for long-term evolution (LTE) services will start to take off as operators quickly roll out networks based on their recently acquired licenses to drive network capacity and enable higher speeds. Despite this growing demand, mobile operators will feel challenged. They will struggle to balance the growing network load and associated expenditure while trying to justify the declines in their traditional business. Operators will need to quickly adopt new business models, increase visibility with their customers, cope with a larger and more diverse set of competitors, and invest in new networks to keep pace with the massive growth in data traffic that is expected.Even though the use of video in the enterprise as a business-enabling tool has not quite reached its critical mass yet, the growing number of video deployments is also placing a significant burden on enterprise networks in the Netherlands. For 2013, IDC expects the load on networks to be intensified by the growing use of video within the enterprise, especially as a result of the proliferation of smartphones and media tablets. The growing number of desktop and mobile video users will present scalability challenges for enterprise networks too networks that have already been stretched to support the existing number of telepresence and room-based video systems. The enterprise videoconferencing equipment market in the Netherlands is expected to reach close to $57.1 million in 2013, which reflects a revenue increase of 17.1% YoY. Leading verticals for videoconferencing and telepresence deployments are finance, education, healthcare, government, and hospitality. We also expect an increasing uptake in the retail and manufacturing verticals.Video — along with other 3rd Platform forces such as mobility, social business, and Big Data — is one of the factors driving network life-cycle services in the Netherlands. While other services markets are sluggish, the market for network consulting and integration services will grow at a CAGR of 2.6% in 2011–2016, with an overall value of $582 million. IDC expects to see much more emphasis on network life-cycle services from a range of players, including service providers, systems integrators (SIs), VARs, and network equipment vendors.
  • Prediction #3: The Dutch telecom market will be data driven; overall revenue will remain flat in 2013The telecommunications market in the Netherlands will show a relatively flat development in 2013 as consumers and businesses are expected to spend a total of €11.1 billion on connectivity services. While more traditional services such as fixed voice, legacy data services, mobile voice, and messaging will continue to decline, growth segments such as IP voice, Ethernet, broadband, and mobile data are expected to grow to balance market development in 2013.The trend from a voice-driven to a data-driven industry will continue in 2013 across fixed and mobile. Ethernet services will be a key growth area in the fixed market. IDC sees that enterprises are increasingly adopting these services not only to help connect multiple sites to one another and to datacenters but also to help address their ever-growing bandwidth requirements. Demand for fixed broadband access will show only modest growth, though within this market, fiber to the premises (FTTP) will gain substantial ground, especially at the expense of DSL.The voice to data transition will be even more evident in the mobile space. While revenue for mobile voice services will decline by 8% YoY, revenue for mobile data services will show 12% growth. This specific market will be fueled by the growing number of smartphones, PC dongles, media tablet users, and other mobile-connected devices. In addition, demand for long-term evolution (LTE) services will start to take off as operators quickly roll out networks based on their recently acquired licenses to drive network capacity and enable higher speeds. Despite this growing demand, mobile operators will feel challenged. They will struggle to balance the growing network load and associated expenditure while trying to justify the declines in their traditional business. Operators will need to quickly adopt new business models, increase visibility with their customers, cope with a larger and more diverse set of competitors, and invest in new networks to keep pace with the massive growth in data traffic that is expected.Even though the use of video in the enterprise as a business-enabling tool has not quite reached its critical mass yet, the growing number of video deployments is also placing a significant burden on enterprise networks in the Netherlands. For 2013, IDC expects the load on networks to be intensified by the growing use of video within the enterprise, especially as a result of the proliferation of smartphones and media tablets. The growing number of desktop and mobile video users will present scalability challenges for enterprise networks too networks that have already been stretched to support the existing number of telepresence and room-based video systems. The enterprise videoconferencing equipment market in the Netherlands is expected to reach close to $57.1 million in 2013, which reflects a revenue increase of 17.1% YoY. Leading verticals for videoconferencing and telepresence deployments are finance, education, healthcare, government, and hospitality. We also expect an increasing uptake in the retail and manufacturing verticals.Video — along with other 3rd Platform forces such as mobility, social business, and Big Data — is one of the factors driving network life-cycle services in the Netherlands. While other services markets are sluggish, the market for network consulting and integration services will grow at a CAGR of 2.6% in 2011–2016, with an overall value of $582 million. IDC expects to see much more emphasis on network life-cycle services from a range of players, including service providers, systems integrators (SIs), VARs, and network equipment vendors.
  • Prediction #2: Mobility will drive corporatization of consumersThe massive penetration of smartphones in the Dutch market has been one of the underlying factors in the unstoppable force known as the consumerization of IT. Currently adding to the weight of evidence that the market is moving toward consumerization and bring-your-own-device (BYOD) policies, we find high-profile Dutch companies such as KLM, Heineken, and TNT Post introducing tablets and smartphones into their field operations. Users are changing the way organizations work and interact with technology.CIOs need a holistic view of all IT to recognize relevant changes in the industry. IDC research shows that CIOs feel the pressures of complexity at the infrastructure level have led to increasing management costs. Acting on these pressures, we see broad adoption of technologies such as mobile device management (MDM), which reduces complexity in the IT landscape by providing the right tools to access and manage IT with more control. However, this only goes some way to solving the issue. Real cost savings can be achieved by consolidating infrastructure and, importantly, the amount of operating systems and applications that are tied to heterogeneous environments. CIOs tell IDC they are continuing to rationalize complexity at this layer and achieving measurable cost savings by reducing staff. But it is interesting to note that while complexity is being reduced in one part of the enterprise, it is expanding rapidly in another as a result of mobility, BYOD, and consumerization.IDC predicts that throughout 2013, mobility investments will show enterprise IT and consumerization blending together to corporatize the consumer. Starting at a policy level, CIOs will begin to make decisions to support a limited number of client operating systems by extending a small pool of devices. At a technology level, CIOs will favor operating systems that offer superior application interoperability to allow workers to easily connect to the existing enterprise applications and workloads. With 2013 projected to be another tough year, with cost pressures and the need to move spending to more critical parts of the IT ecosystem, IDC predicts that the Netherlands will start to see the corporatization of the consumer in mid- to late 2013.
  • Prediction #3: The Dutch telecom market will be data driven; overall revenue will remain flat in 2013The telecommunications market in the Netherlands will show a relatively flat development in 2013 as consumers and businesses are expected to spend a total of €11.1 billion on connectivity services. While more traditional services such as fixed voice, legacy data services, mobile voice, and messaging will continue to decline, growth segments such as IP voice, Ethernet, broadband, and mobile data are expected to grow to balance market development in 2013.The trend from a voice-driven to a data-driven industry will continue in 2013 across fixed and mobile. Ethernet services will be a key growth area in the fixed market. IDC sees that enterprises are increasingly adopting these services not only to help connect multiple sites to one another and to datacenters but also to help address their ever-growing bandwidth requirements. Demand for fixed broadband access will show only modest growth, though within this market, fiber to the premises (FTTP) will gain substantial ground, especially at the expense of DSL.The voice to data transition will be even more evident in the mobile space. While revenue for mobile voice services will decline by 8% YoY, revenue for mobile data services will show 12% growth. This specific market will be fueled by the growing number of smartphones, PC dongles, media tablet users, and other mobile-connected devices. In addition, demand for long-term evolution (LTE) services will start to take off as operators quickly roll out networks based on their recently acquired licenses to drive network capacity and enable higher speeds. Despite this growing demand, mobile operators will feel challenged. They will struggle to balance the growing network load and associated expenditure while trying to justify the declines in their traditional business. Operators will need to quickly adopt new business models, increase visibility with their customers, cope with a larger and more diverse set of competitors, and invest in new networks to keep pace with the massive growth in data traffic that is expected.Even though the use of video in the enterprise as a business-enabling tool has not quite reached its critical mass yet, the growing number of video deployments is also placing a significant burden on enterprise networks in the Netherlands. For 2013, IDC expects the load on networks to be intensified by the growing use of video within the enterprise, especially as a result of the proliferation of smartphones and media tablets. The growing number of desktop and mobile video users will present scalability challenges for enterprise networks too networks that have already been stretched to support the existing number of telepresence and room-based video systems. The enterprise videoconferencing equipment market in the Netherlands is expected to reach close to $57.1 million in 2013, which reflects a revenue increase of 17.1% YoY. Leading verticals for videoconferencing and telepresence deployments are finance, education, healthcare, government, and hospitality. We also expect an increasing uptake in the retail and manufacturing verticals.Video — along with other 3rd Platform forces such as mobility, social business, and Big Data — is one of the factors driving network life-cycle services in the Netherlands. While other services markets are sluggish, the market for network consulting and integration services will grow at a CAGR of 2.6% in 2011–2016, with an overall value of $582 million. IDC expects to see much more emphasis on network life-cycle services from a range of players, including service providers, systems integrators (SIs), VARs, and network equipment vendors.
  • Facilitating means thinking in opportunities, there will be enough people around you telling you the risks.be pragmatic, things will keep changing anywayNo one-size-fits all, needtochoose best fit solution per situation
  • ANIMATED.
  • Agenda for this presentation
  • Prediction #7: Private cloud adoption will drive enterprise public cloud growthIDC predicts that throughout 2013, larger organizations in the Netherlands will start to place their bets on the public cloud. IDC believes the adoption of private cloud solutions is driving acceptance of public cloud among Dutch enterprises.While some organizations have moved to a private cloud environment for either enterprise applications or storage, the acceptance and trust in cloud solutions in the Netherlands is strongly increasing, particularly from line-of-business (LoB) managers. One of the most obvious user benefits of the cloud service model is that it is presented as an all-in, turnkey solution where the customer can access the offering without the need to own, manage, or understand any underlying resources required to support the offering. For many LoB managers, this implies that even those without IT skills are able to purchase and leverage cloud services directly. IDC expects that the enterprise adoption of private cloud services will not hinder public cloud services demand. In fact, IDC believes the opposite — private cloud adoption will help sustain or even accelerate the acceptance and growth of public cloud in several ways.For example, private cloud provides a middle road between conventional IT and public cloud solutions. After witnessing early movers safely shift toward private cloud services to gain a competitive advantage, late followers are confident that by now the best practices are in place to make the move to even the public cloud. Furthermore, as competition in private cloud increases, public cloud vendors and independent software vendors (ISVs) are challenged to deliver services embedded with security and governance elements. The main factor often stalling public cloud adoption is concerns around security. However, according to a recent IDC study for the European Commission, the end-user organizations with the most cloud services are actually still very concerned, yet they carry on adopting even more services. Therefore it seems as if security concerns are no longer blocking the adoption of cloud services, but are driving how and where cloud services are deployed.Do not think private cloud is going to be cast aside. IDC expects that it will continue to grow at incredible rates. Private cloud adoption has been forecast to grow 24% in 2013 in the Netherlands, but public cloud will grow at a rate of 31%. With the step to adopting public SaaS solutions becoming easier in 2013, in particular for productivity tools (e.g., conferencing, team collaboration, and social) and marketing applications (e.g., customer relationship management or CRM), we expect many LoB managers in the Netherlands to be investing in the SaaS delivery model.
  • Great definitions for Cloud Services (SPI)Software as a Service (SaaS) is a software distribution model in which applications are hosted by a vendor or service provider and made available to customers over a network, typically the Internet.Platform as a Service (PaaS) is a way to rent hardware, operating systems, storage and network capacity over the Internet. The service delivery model allows the customer to rent virtualized servers and associated services for running existing applications or developing and testing new ones.Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is a provision model in which an organization outsources the equipment used to support operations, including storage, hardware, servers and networking components. The service provider owns the equipment and is responsible for housing, running and maintaining it. The client typically pays on a per-use basis.Characteristics and components of IaaS include:Utility computing service and billing model.Automation of administrative tasks.Dynamic scaling.Desktop VirtualizationPolicy-based services.Internet connectivity.In the IaaS model, you are provided virtual server containers within which you have control of the OS image, storage, limited networking options, and applications deployed with the environment.In the PaaS model, you are operating one level above IaaS. The OS environment is already present and most likely an application development framework as well. In the PaaS model, you are dealing with an application environment. There are 3 basic cloud engagement strategies: Consumer to Consumer, Business to Consumer, and Business to Business. Each have their priorities and customer sets as illustrated.It is important to understand these since there are significant dollars being spent on Cloud Services. Here’s an example of spending trends on Public Cloud Services (next slide)
  • Prediction #10: CIOs will play a smaller role in the evaluation and ownership of ICT investmentsThe CIO agenda is shifting from IT efficiency to business productivity as the CIO's role moves from managing portfolios of systems and technologies to portfolios of services. CIOs will need a flexible architecture not only to enable incremental operating improvements by exploiting their existing IT infrastructures but also to tackle even more profound challenges by providing newer generations of IT, meeting the expanding operating and capacity requirements, dealing with an aging IT infrastructure, and relieving constrained financial resources. In IDC's view, the primary role of the future CIO will be focused on business services, enabling business agility, and business innovation.A recent IDC survey of Dutch IT decision makers revealed that the top 3 technology areas where organizations will be investing in 2013 are mobility, security, and collaboration (with 15.7%, 13.6%, and 12.6% of responses respectively). However, ICT priorities for 2013 were somewhat different, namely improving the IT infrastructure (19.4%), lowering the overall cost structure (15.9%), and leveraging IT to enhance business processes through, for example, automation (15.7%).During preliminary discussions with Dutch CIOs in preparation for IDC and CIO.nl's annual Dutch CIO Summit in February 2013, many topics revolved around the sharp increase in business involvement in IT investments. This confirms that the impact of the 3rd Platform is increasing business ownership and reflects the latest diverse models for business/IT engagement. The relative ease of adopting these technologies, coupled with their impact on the business, has empowered business executives to engage directly in technology-enabled business improvement. Active business engagement in technology adoption has effectively democratized the strategic use of technologies and shaken up the traditional role of the CIO. IDC believes that this is only the beginning of a much higher percentage of business engagement in IT investment and strategy.Not only is the role of the CIO changing in terms of IT investment evaluations, but the links between enterprise goals and IT investments are changing as well. Funding IT infrastructure investments has long been a profound challenge for business and IT executives. Business executives tend to think of capital investments as long-term expenditures, yet in the IT world many capital investments need to be depreciated over three to five years. Effectively, this means that as soon as the business is starting to get comfortable with the infrastructure, it is time to discuss additional capacity, new functionality, or even replacing equipment (or software) that has reached end of life. To cope with this, most organizations use a dual-funding strategy for IT. On the one hand, elements of the core IT infrastructure (e.g., datacenters, distributed computing platforms, and business-wide applications) are funded as part of the general and administrative expenses. On the other hand, costs related to specific LoB applications are allocated over separate business units, departments, or teams. As we transition into the 3rd Platform, one characterized by service-like models, IDC believes that LoB involvement in IT projects will grow to 80% over the next three years. In the future, IT investments are expected to be evaluated through corporate strategies and owned by the business executives who use the services, especially as non-capital-intensive options, such as cloud computing and outsourcing, present increasingly viable alternatives.Hence, the explosion of new industry solutions will dramatically shift to who the IT buyer is. We predict that a direct result of business innovation on the 3rd Platform creates a wider variety of new solutions targeted at new business opportunities and challenges. IDC research indicates that more than half of new IT investments in 2013 will involve direct participation by LoB executives, most notably by those in charge of customer-facing front-office functions. 2013 will mark a considerable shift in focus for many IT professionals — and this shift will be subtle but profound. It is no longer about IT enabling the business; the lines between IT and the business have blurred. In many cases, technology has become the business. CIOs should be looking ahead, embracing their role as business innovators and preparing for the future state of IT. To regain and exert some basic control over the information architecture, CIOs should revisit IT planning, governance, and portfolio management methods.
  • There is no doubt that the 3rd Platform will be fundamental for the decisions made in 2013 for ICT vendors, CIOs, and LoB managers. In our 2012 predictions for the Netherlands, we noted that the ICT industry is in the midst of a "once every 20–25 years" shift, and we see that this year will reach a more mature stage in its development. Most of the 2013 predictions cluster around the developments that derive from mobile devices and apps, cloud services, mobile broadband networks, Big Data analytics, and social technologies as it is shaping the ICT market, not only in the Netherlands but also in the rest of Europe.For CIOs. The role of the CIO is changing. The involvement of LoBs in IT investments is becoming more dominant as the industry shifts to more service-like delivery models. For CIOs, it will be increasingly important that basic control over the IT environment is regained by retaking ownership over the IT planning, governance, and portfolio management methods. This year, CIOs will have to focus on driving business outcomes while creating a more efficient organization. In achieving this goal, the four pillar technologies are IT technology areas that should be given detailed consideration as the means for gaining the fastest benefit.For IT vendors. The predictions point out that IT vendors will need to keep a strong focus on the four technology pillars found in IDC's 3rd Platform. In the Netherlands, it is now even more important that vendors have relevant vertical industry knowledge and build relationships with LoB executives — aside from the CIO — by providing compelling industry-specific, business-value insights beyond their own services. These are long-term objectives and go beyond 2013. It will be vital that all vendors strive to ensure their teams are sufficiently educated to articulate the benefits of their offerings as the competition is growing, and if they all want a piece of the pie in this new market environment, try to get a piece of this new market environment.

ICT Innovatie sessie Q4 2013 ICT Innovatie sessie Q4 2013 Presentation Transcript

  • What‟s going on in the ICT Market in The Netherlands "Competing on and with the Third Platform" Jeroen Wortel and Jan van Vonno 23 August 2013
  •  Introduction  Context  3rd generation platform  Big Data – “Analytics”  Social Media - “Socialitics”  Mobility – “XYOD”  Cloud – “X as a Service”  Q & A + discuss real life implementation © IDC Visit us at IDC.com and follow us on Twitter: @IDC 2
  • STRATEGISCH PLAN ICT: “ We willen een innoverende afdeling zijn waarbinnen we, nauw samenwerkend met onze leveranciers en partners, continue op zoek zijn naar toepassings mogelijkheden voor nieuwe technologie die ons en [bedrijf x] helpen het gewaagd doel te bereiken.” © IDC Visit us at IDC.com and follow us on Twitter: @IDC 3
  • Tough Economic Times ...yet IT is more essential than ever " ICT and the Internet are crucial for the future growth of the Netherlands " Henk Kamp Minister of Economic Affairs © IDC Source: CPB Policy Brief | 2013/06 4
  • 2013 & 2014 GDP Scenarios 4.0% 3.0% 2.0% 1.0% 0.0% 2013 2014 -1.0% -2.0% -3.0% -4.0% -5.0% Source: Local Statistical Entities, March 2013 © IDC Visit us at IDC.com and follow us on Twitter: @IDC 5
  • Netherlands IDC Survey: CIO agenda 2013 IT staff development 2012 1% 21% 26% Business Outlook Decreased 6-12 months from now Remained the same 22% 0-6 months from now 32% 35% 46% 31% 34% Increased Current 39% 31% 30% Don't know 52% 0% Negative 20% 40% Neutral 60% 80% 100% Positive ICT Budget for 2013 24% 0% 10% 20% 43% 30% 40% Decreased 50% 32% 60% Remained the same 70% 80% Increased © IDC Visit us at IDC.com and follow us on Twitter: @IDC 90% 100% N = 94 6
  • Dutch IT spending will be slow but boosted by mobility 2013 €31.6 billion 2012 €31.1 billion 12% -3% -5% -9% -14% 25% 30% -25% © IDC Source: IDC Black Book v3 2012; IDC Netherlands CIO Survey Dec 2012 7
  • © IDC Visit us at IDC.com and follow us on Twitter: @IDC 8
  • BILLIONS OF USERS (+Trillions of Things) HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS OF USERS MILLIONS OF USERS MILLIONS OF APPS TENS OF THOUSANDS OF APPS THOUSANDS OF APPS © IDC Visit us at IDC.com 9 and follow us on Twitter: @IDC
  • Dutch shopkeepers will embrace omnichannel retailing – what lessons can we learn?? 52 % of Dutch retailers rate social media a top priority © IDC Source: IDC Vertical IT & Communications Survey, 2012, IDC Netherlands CIO Survey, Dec 2012 10
  • © IDC Visit us at IDC.com and follow us on Twitter: @IDC 11
  • Many of Our Daily Activities Generate Data Office Apps Enterprise Apps Web Apps Data Creation is a Part of our Daily Lives 12
  • The Four V‟s of Big Data Volume Velocity Variety Value © IDC Visit us at IDC.com and follow us on Twitter: @IDC 13
  • Big Data/ BA /BI
  • How can [company x] use Big Data? What kind of data do you have in your ICT Infrastructure? Think about: Targeted Marketing Internal process efficiency - Logistics Customer Experience Ecommerce – analyze website behavior Fee payment Consistency Up/ Cross selling information Real life Examples: Car Insurance X Airline and Hotel Chains – Yield mgt Rijkswaterstaat Police & TomTom - Traffic Facebook & Google © IDC Visit us at IDC.com and follow us on Twitter: @IDC 15
  • Welcome1234 © IDC Visit us at IDC.com and follow us on Twitter: @IDC 16
  • The Conversation Prism By Brian Solis & JESS3 17
  • Social is changing expectations consumer social principles Social Business business operations and interactions © IDC 2013 18
  • IDC‟s Social Business “Processes" Digital Commerce (mobile, social, electronic) Collaboration Employee-Focused Customer-Focused Brand Maintenance Social Commerce Contact Center Customer Experience Management Supplier Networks CustomerSocial Service Channels Service Co-Innovation Innovation Management Customer Engagement Marketing Community-Based Support External Users Sales Intelligence Sales Social Marketing Sales Enablement Talent HCM Acquisition Social Learning Project portfolio management Collaborative Project Management Enterprise Social Software Employee Social Network Internal Users Socialytics (network behavior, content, social data, customer behavior) © IDC 2013 19 19
  • Social Marketing will make a paradigm shift in the Netherlands 35 of Dutch CIOs rate Social Media a Very Important investment priority % © IDC Source: IDC Social Business in Europe Survey, 2012 20
  • Social is real time and in context © IDC 2013 21
  • Excellent Dutch Example © IDC Visit us at IDC.com and follow us on Twitter: @IDC 22
  • © IDC Visit us at IDC.com and follow us on Twitter: @IDC 23
  • Social Listening © IDC Visit us at IDC.com and follow us on Twitter: @IDC 24
  • Facebook – Affection Twitter Facebook - Complaints © IDC Visit us at IDC.com and follow us on Twitter: @IDC 25
  • Enterprise social collaboration will continue to be the fastest-growing software market in the Netherlands © IDC Source: IDC Black Book v3 2012; IDC Netherlands CIO Survey Dec 2012 26
  • Enterprise Social Networks © IDC Visit us at IDC.com and follow us on Twitter: @IDC 27
  • ESN Best Practice Examples  Gamification • Humana Insurance, highly regulated industry with structured policy around data retention. Engaging with internal and external users with gamification (SocialCast).  Crowdsourcing / co-creation • DBS Bank in Singapore uses Facebook as a principal engagement platform to build different local and regional communities. The crowdsourcing event "I Designed a Bank" aspired designers to pitch ideas on the creation of a youth-oriented branch – finally improving banking experience through devices  Process “improvements” • Westfield, identified a design flaw in gift cards and addressed it on yammer, Saving of 6 weeks in issue resolution time. (Yammer)  Engagement marketing / User-generated content • The hotel chain DoubleTree created a vehicle called Dtour on which visitors can celebrate the little things that make a difference and inspires a whole new way to plan and share travels. © IDC 2013 28
  •  Mobility vs. Consumerization  BYOD – BYOT – BYOITE – CYOD – (SYOI or SYOS)  Impact intern + extern © IDC Source: IDC European Telecommunications Database, Q3 2012 29
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  • Infrastructure Complexity Device Complexity Mobility will drive “corporatization” of consumers Consumerization BYOD Corporatization Policies , Standards & Governance Rationalisation Virtualisation © IDC Source: IDC's Western Europe Enterprise Mobility Survey, 2012 31
  • Fixed Mobile The Dutch telecoms market will be flat but driven by data © IDC Source: IDC European Telecommunications Database, Q3 2012 32
  • To BYOD or not to BYOD The challenges of BYOD • Security • Company content  Document sharing • Telecom expenses  Roaming • Support • Regulation • User experience 33
  • mobility roadmap SSL VPN on iOS iPads in business mobile device mgmt mobile Android support device standard Android sales tablets IM on mobile 34 SCCM 2012 IBCM AD federation 2012 Direct Access iOS DLP Windows Phone 8 UC enterprise voice Windows 7 tablets 2011 MacBook in business company file collaboration Windows 8 enterprise workplace from the cloud Windows To Go Windows RT BYOD AD pwd change on mobile inTune 2013 34
  • summary • • • • • • 35 facilitate be pragmatic no one-size-fits-all focus on user experience maintain standards and roadmaps ensure business has a role in making the choices 35
  • Technology Application Ecosystem Collaboration / Communication Email Browser Contacts SharePoint / File Access / Sync Cloud Storage Calendar Good Share mobilEcho Colligo Accellion e-Printing Remote Desktop Breezy Good for Enterprise NetDocuments Box SplashTop Bus. Intelligence Roambi Good Connect Document Editing / Annotation iAnnotate Good Reader Picsel SmartOffice NewsGator Social Sites Salesforce Harmon.ie Advanced Productivity DTE Axiom (Legal Time Entry) ©2012 Good Technology, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Autonomy iManage WorkSite Mobility (Document management for Legal) Company Confidential ISEC7 Mobility for SAP PhoneMine MobileForce MADP Vertical-Specific Thomson Reuters Pitchboard (I-Banking collaboration) ERP Social Business ByteSquared Office2 Microstrategy CellTrak Visit Manager Verivo PhoneGap 36
  • Where are we going? Workplace of the Future needs to recognizes and supports generational diversity Experienced workers (Age 50 +) growing as % of workforce wisdom and intellectual capital of the organization email Mid- career (Age 35 – 50) shrinking as % of workforce essential professionals and middle managers instant messaging New generation (born after 1980) growing as % of workforce critical to long-term viability and innovation social networking 37
  • - Just another way of IT delivery / IT Outsourcing - Mostly computing power and storage - Main differentiators: flexible, scalable, pay per use - Saas, Iaas, Paas : Hybrid will rule for the short term © IDC Visit us at IDC.com and follow us on Twitter: @IDC 38
  • Private cloud adoption will drive Dutch enterprise public cloud growth © IDC Source: IDC Benelux Cloud Forecast 2011 – 2016; IDC Netherlands CIO Survey Dec 2012 39 39
  • Why is Cloud Important? Cloud Business Models Drive Consumer and Enterprise Divide Cloud Service and Delivery Saas Paas Iaas Public Hybrid Private Consumer Cloud Blended Cloud Enterprise Cloud Consumer to Consumer Business to Consumer Business to Business Lack of Privacy a Reality Provider is Trusted Quality of Service is Important Security , Compliance & SLAs are Differentiators
  • © IDC Visit us at IDC.com and follow us on Twitter: @IDC 41
  • IDC is the premier global provider of market intelligence, advisory services, and events for the information technology, telecommunications, and consumer technology markets. IDC helps IT professionals, business executives, and the investment community make fact-based decisions on technology purchases and business strategy. More than 1,000 IDC analysts provide global, regional, and local expertise on technology and industry opportunities and trends in over 110 countries worldwide. Terms of Use: Except as otherwise noted, the information enclosed is the intellectual property of IDC, copyright 2013. Reproduction is forbidden unless authorized; contact permissions@idc.com for information. All rights reserved. © IDC Visit us at IDC.com and follow us on Twitter: @IDC 42
  • The Dutch CIO role is changing; LoB execs more involved in IT decisions LoBs will participate in Top 3 CIO Priorities for 2013: Improve IT infrastructure, lower IT cost, leverage IT better Top 3 Technology Investment Areas for 2013: 80 % of IT decisions by 2015 Mobility, security, and collaboration © IDC Source: IDC Netherlands CIO Survey, Dec 2012 43
  • Essential Guidance Retake ownership over the IT planning, governance, and portfolio management methods to regain control over the IT environment. Give the four pillar technologies detailed consideration as the means for gaining the fastest benefit. "The keys words are: simplification, automation, acceleration, innovation and information security." Focus on driving business outcomes while creating a more efficient organization. Advice – be relevant – be the “ go to department „” for innovation © IDC Visit us at IDC.com and follow us on Twitter: @IDC 44