How to Run a                                                        PRESENTATION BY                                       ...
How to Run a                                                                  THE BASICSGood Meeting                      ...
How to Run a                                                                  THE BASICSGood Meeting                      ...
How to Run a                                                         THE BASICSGood Meeting                               ...
How to Run a                                      PLANNING IS YOUR JOBGood Meeting                                        ...
How to Run a                           PLANNING IS YOUR JOBGood Meeting                                                   ...
How to Run a                        PLANNING IS YOUR JOBGood Meeting                                                      ...
How to Run a                                    PLANNING IS YOUR JOBGood Meeting                                          ...
How to Run a                                      PLANNING IS YOUR JOBGood Meeting                                        ...
How to Run a                             PLANNING IS YOUR JOBGood Meeting                                                 ...
How to Run a                        PLANNING IS YOUR JOBGood Meeting                                                      ...
How to Run a                          PLANNING IS YOUR JOBGood Meeting                                                    ...
How to Run a                         FACILITATING DISCUSSIONGood Meeting                                                  ...
How to Run a                                  FACILITATING DISCUSSIONGood Meeting                                         ...
How to Run a                         FACILITATING DISCUSSIONGood Meeting                                                  ...
How to Run a                                FACILITATING DISCUSSIONGood Meeting                                           ...
How to Run a                               FACILITATING DISCUSSIONGood Meeting                                            ...
How to Run a                              FACILITATING DISCUSSIONGood Meeting                                             ...
How to Run a                          FACILITATING DISCUSSIONGood Meeting                                                 ...
How to Run a                                      FACILITATING DISCUSSIONGood Meeting                                     ...
How to Run a                        FACILITATING DISCUSSIONGood Meeting                                                   ...
How to Run a                     FACILITATING DISCUSSIONGood Meeting                                                      ...
How to Run a                                             MAKING DECISIONSGood Meeting                                     ...
How to Run a                                    MAKING DECISIONSGood Meeting                                              ...
How to Run a                                            MAKING DECISIONSGood Meeting                                      ...
How to Run a                                            MAKING DECISIONSGood Meeting                                      ...
How to Run a                                MAKING DECISIONSGood Meeting                                                  ...
How to Run a                              MAKING DECISIONSGood Meeting                                                    ...
How to Run a                                            MAKING DECISIONSGood Meeting                                      ...
How to Run a                                           MAKING DECISIONSGood Meeting                                       ...
How to Run a                                       KEEPING RECORDSGood Meeting                                            ...
How to Run a                                           KEEPING RECORDSGood Meeting                                        ...
How to Run a                                       MAKING DECISIONSGood Meeting                                           ...
How to Run a                                                       KEEPING RECORDSGood Meeting                            ...
How to Run a                                               CONCLUSIONGood Meeting                                         ...
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How to Run a Good Meeting

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How to Run a Good Meeting -- Learn the basics, principles and tips that will enable you to run great meetings in any organization.

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How to Run a Good Meeting

  1. 1. How to Run a PRESENTATION BY JEREMY D. SHERGood Meeting Welcome, and thanks for listening! Jeremy Sher is President of Grassroots Giving Group, Inc., located in Boston, Mass. jeremy@grassrootsgivinggroup.comCopyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  2. 2. How to Run a THE BASICSGood Meeting 1 of34 GROUND RULES: Talking about Talking No Interrupting! • Interruptions waste ideas An Atmosphere of • Interruptors aren’t listening Respect . . . • Interrupting is rude Make it a priority to maintain an atmosphere Generating Other Ground Rules ofrespect. Think of • Let participants suggest their own rules rudeness as a waste of • Brainstorm and seek agreement time and energy. • You don’t need too many rulesCopyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  3. 3. How to Run a THE BASICSGood Meeting 2 of34 WHAT IS A MEETING FOR? Making Decisions • Assigning responsibilities to people, and checking in Meetings Are • Answering questions that are before the organization Expensive! • Planning and controlling projects The cost ofa meeting is: Providing Information • the cost ofpeople’s time, • the opportunity cost of • Presenting progress reports and getting feedback what they could be doing, • Making announcements and taking questions • materials and support, • Also, sometimes providing a sense ofgroup unity • sometimes travel and food.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Use the time wisely! Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  4. 4. How to Run a THE BASICSGood Meeting 3 of34 Opening a Meeting Closing a Meeting Be Punctual! Be Punctual! Make a clear opening. Create a sense ofclosure. • Welcome participants. • Review accomplishments. • Distribute the agenda. • Review decisions made. • Review responsibilities assigned. It is important to let people know • Pronounce the meeting over. that the meeting has begun.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  5. 5. How to Run a PLANNING IS YOUR JOBGood Meeting 4 of34 SETTING THE AGENDA • The agenda is provided Why Is the Agenda in writing. So Important? The agenda serves two important functions: • The agenda is distributed at least 24 hours in advance. 1. It provides a sense of accomplishment that comes from reaching Ifit isn’t possible to distribute a final agenda clearly defined goals. 24 hours in advance, then at least give your 1. It helps the meeting run participants a draft agenda. more smoothly.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  6. 6. How to Run a PLANNING IS YOUR JOBGood Meeting 5 of34 Dividing Up Your Time: ORDERING   Briefitems   Easily estimated duration  Minor items or “chores” More Interesting  Controversial   BEGINNING OF MEETING END OF MEETINGCopyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  7. 7. How to Run a PLANNING IS YOUR JOBGood Meeting 6 of34 Dividing Up Your Time: EMPHASIS Allocate More Time for . . . • Items ofgreater consequence • More controversial items * * Sometimes, it’s best to allocate less time for controversial items, ifyou feel that all the arguments have been heard before, and you’re going to ask for a decision.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  8. 8. How to Run a PLANNING IS YOUR JOBGood Meeting 7 of34 Dividing Up Your Time: PRINCIPLES Think about participants’ interest level and attention span. • Intersperse long discussions with quick items. • Don’t leave a “dead zone” ofboring business at the end ofthe meeting. • Put most quick items earlier. People get anxious ifyou’re still stuck on Item 1 halfway through the meeting. Make sure participants leave with a sense ofaccomplishment. • Plan for as much as you think you can realistically accomplish. • Be sure to end the meeting on a positive note. Plan for any internal political issues that may come up. • Keep in mind which, ifany, agenda issues might be sensitive.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  9. 9. How to Run a PLANNING IS YOUR JOBGood Meeting 8 of34 Dividing Up Your Time: PRIORITIES What ifyou have too much to do in the time available? Set and adhere to strict time limits. • This is a skill that you will acquire with practice. Plan to continue some items at a future meeting. • Try to make at least some progress at this meeting. Break a large task into subtasks, and accomplish at least one subtask. Postpone some items. • Perhaps some ofyour work could be “pushed” to the next meeting. Insist on business. • Maintain a particularly businesslike tone. “No goofing around today.”Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  10. 10. How to Run a PLANNING IS YOUR JOBGood Meeting 9 of34 MAINTAINING PUNCTUALITY Why is punctuality so important? Your skill at running things on time shows that: • You are in control ofthe meeting. • You take the group’s business seriously. • You understand that people have other commitments, and you respect their schedules. Maintaining punctuality is your first opportunity to show your skill as a chairperson.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  11. 11. How to Run a PLANNING IS YOUR JOBGood Meeting 10 of34 Start on Time. End on Time. •Start your meeting as •You are responsible for soon as possible after the making sure your meeting scheduled time. gets finished on schedule. •Watch your first impression: •Respect your participants’ ifyour first few meetings start schedules, and they will on time, people will know to respect yours. arrive on time—but it also Ifyou started a couple minutes late, you works the other way around. might end late by that exact amount oftime, as an incentive for people to be punctual.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  12. 12. How to Run a PLANNING IS YOUR JOBGood Meeting 11 of34 In a meeting, In a meeting, In a meeting, it is always it is sometimes it is never appropriate to: appropriate to: appropriate to: Have participants Have fun and relax as report on progress and a group Discuss issues that do get feedback not involve every “Workshop” policy member ofthe group Bring new ideas to the ideas or event plans group’s attention Leave extra time for Chastise any individual participants’ from the chair Make decisions AS A comments and/or GROUP announcementsCopyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  13. 13. How to Run a FACILITATING DISCUSSIONGood Meeting 12 of34 RECOGNIZING PEOPLE TO SPEAK Why should you recognize speakers? 1. Recognition establishes that one Formal or Informal speaker has the floor. Recognition? 2. Recognition is essential to Recognition can be formal, maintaining control ofthe meeting. but it doesn’t have to be. The degree offormality is entirely up to you (unless it’s 3. Recognition helps shy or quieter already set by a governing participants feel more comfortable document or authority). speaking up.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  14. 14. How to Run a FACILITATING DISCUSSIONGood Meeting 13 of34 FORMAL RECOGNITION or Informal Recognition? (Some General Pointers) Size ofGroup: LARGER THAN 12? Smaller than 10? Status ofGroup: THE U.S. SENATE? The Tennis Club? Usual Decision- Making Method: ALWAYS VOTING? Not always voting? Expected Level of Controversy: VERY CONTENTIOUS? Not much debate? Some factors will probably weigh one way, while others suggest the other. You have to comply with your group’s formal rules, ifany, but everything beyond that is up to you. Sometimes, you can vary your group’s level offormality for meetings when you feel a different (usually higher) level might be required.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  15. 15. How to Run a FACILITATING DISCUSSIONGood Meeting 14 of34 USING INFORMAL RECOGNITION Informal recognition attempts to retain the benefits offormal recognition while adapting it for a less formal environment. • Generally, call people by name, even without strict rules. • Use hand gestures and face the speaker. Use body language to make it clear that you have recognized someone. • Keep a queue in mind, and even announce it: “John, then Sarah, then Chris, then Jennifer.” • Ifyou let people speak without explicit recognition, keep close tabs on the discussion. Do not hesitate to cut in ifthe discussion needs to be steered back on topic.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  16. 16. How to Run a FACILITATING DISCUSSIONGood Meeting 15 of34 WHO SPEAKS WHEN? Usually, recognize people in the order in which they signal their wish to speak. At times, you may entertain a particular viewpoint or motion. (That is, you recognize that viewpoint before other participants may speak.) This can be done formally or informally. Steering the When is it appropriate to entertain a particular Meeting viewpoint? Remember to keep • Ifa minority view is being overlooked. (“Does anyone comments on topic have a different take on this?”) and stick to your • In contentious debates, it is traditional to alternate allotted time per speakers between the favoring and opposing sides. discussion item.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  17. 17. How to Run a FACILITATING DISCUSSIONGood Meeting 16 of34 PROGRESS REPORTS Progress reports are productive when: • Everyone at the meeting needs to know about the status ofeach project. • All or most participants are in a position to give useful feedback on each project. • A regularly scheduled meeting enforces accountability for getting work done. Progress reports may not be productive when: • There is too much detailed discussion ofissues that don’t involve everyone present. • A report is too long, without a meaningful reason for feedback. (Sometimes the boss is the worst offender—be careful oflong corporate announcements!) There are alternatives to the staffmeeting! • Consider using e-mail for announcements. • Refer some issues to be dealt with individually or in smaller groups, offline. • Consider doing more business in smaller working groups that meet more frequently.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  18. 18. How to Run a FACILITATING DISCUSSIONGood Meeting 17 of34 CULTURAL ISSUES People behave differently in meetings due to differences in culture. Why Do Cultural Issues Matter? Here are some things to watch: Good ideas come from many • Volume ofpeople’s voices: are only the loudest different people in different voices being heard? walks oflife. Ifyou’re only • Willingness to interrupt: can non-interrupters hearing from one subset of get a word in edgewise?* people, you’re not getting the best ideas. • Time before speaking: people may wait to speak Also, diversity in a group can anywhere from a quarter-second to a full second itselflead to mind-opening or longer after someone else has finished speaking. dialogue. Get to know participants’ habits and make sure * Cultural issues make it even more everyone has a chance to be heard. important not to allow interruptions!Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  19. 19. How to Run a FACILITATING DISCUSSIONGood Meeting 18 of34 MANAGING DISAGREEMENT What ifparticipants seriously disagree on an issue, and your group is at an impasse? • Do not be afraid ofdisagreement. Your group may now be doing its best deliberative work! Just try to keep it cordial. • Use brainstorming. • Articulate and follow rules.* • Have people identify the interests at stake, and move away from fixed negotiation positions.** • Try to make sure everyone can live with every decision. ** Negotiation theory can help here.* We’ll say more later about rules. (That’s a topic for another seminar.)Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  20. 20. How to Run a FACILITATING DISCUSSIONGood Meeting 19 of34ADDRESSING PROBLEMATIC BEHAVIOR Problem Dominators Silent Shadows Behavior: Consider that the Unheard * Useless, Incompetent * person may be feeling: Insecure* Uninterested** Put a quick stop to Cold calling: once in a interrupting. ** while; use discretion. Actions you could Phrases that show the Offer praise and take: effects ofthe behavior. encouragement. (“Let’s give someone else a chance.”) Don’t dominate the In private, ask them conversation yourself. about their interests.* Active Listening can help here. ** These may become disciplinary issues.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  21. 21. How to Run a FACILITATING DISCUSSIONGood Meeting 20 of34 Addressing Problematic Behavior: YOUR TONE IS ALL-IMPORTANT! • You can communicate the same idea in very different ways. • Watch your tone ofvoice. Try it: “Let’s give someone else a chance.” • Watch your word choice. Try it: “So far, your project is a failure.” “Your project has not yet met its objectives.” • Your goal is a smoothly run meeting. Do not chastise publicly! • Keep your tone: constructive open and welcoming impersonal and impartialCopyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  22. 22. How to Run a FACILITATING DISCUSSIONGood Meeting 21 of34ABOUT ROBERT’S RULES OF ORDER . . . • Robert’s Rules are wonderful for ensuring that meetings are fair, and • that they proceed smoothly. and complexity tend to scare people. Unfortunately, their formalityIfyou don’t use Robert’s Rules, you can still use their principles: • Comments must be germane to the topic at hand • Decorum is essential • Equal time for opposing viewsYou might run Robert’s Rules “in the background.” • Governing authority in case ofprocedural questions • Run your meetings in the spirit ofRobert’s Rules.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  23. 23. How to Run a MAKING DECISIONSGood Meeting 22 of34 The most important thing is that formal decisions be accepted as legitimate. Decisions are made BY THE GROUP, and BY THE RULES. • As a leader, you will sometimes have to respect—and represent—decisions with which you personally disagree. • In a deliberative meeting, the chairperson or facilitator does not usually express his or her own opinions. You do so at your own risk. You must run the meeting fairly.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  24. 24. How to Run a MAKING DECISIONSGood Meeting 23 of34 Choosing a Decision-Making Method: CONSENSUS or VOTING? Your decision-making method must be clearly defined in advance. Consider consensus when: What ifI’m • The group has a specific common goal the Boss? • The group is fairly small Ifyou make the • You want a more cautious approach decisions personally, you have a lot more Consider voting when: latitude—but the • The group must take formal policy positions morale issues of process legitimacy • The group is larger than 8 to 10 participants still exist. More on • The group may need to make decisions quickly the next slide.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  25. 25. How to Run a MAKING DECISIONSGood Meeting 24 of34 Choosing a Decision-Making Method: WHAT IF I’M THE BOSS? You may find yourselfrunning meetings in situations where you make the decisions personally. But questions often come up at meetings, and people have views on issues under consideration. • You will get better work and participation out ofpeople ifthey feel their time in meetings is well spent. Isn’t legitimacy • People will come to you with creative ideas more often if what I decide? they know they will be heard in a predictable manner. No. The decision is Here are some ideas for how to use discussion time: what you decide— legitimacy is how you • Frame the group decision as a recommendation to you. decide it, and how your • Participate in the discussion (but don’t dominate it). process is perceived by • Take the opportunity to hear and evaluate different views. other stakeholders.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  26. 26. How to Run a MAKING DECISIONSGood Meeting 25 of34 WHEN IS THE GROUP READY FOR A DECISION? Move toward a decision when These Signs Are you see one ofthese signs: for Consensus Groups, Too • All (or most) participants seem to agree They signal that extended – OR – discussion is no longer productive. In a consensus • Arguments get rehashed on all sides; group, this means it’s time discussion produces few new ideas for you to actively push the group for a decision.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  27. 27. How to Run a MAKING DECISIONSGood Meeting 26 of34 IN A CONSENSUS GROUP: Ifyou see consensus . . . Ifthere is an impasse . . . • Try the suggestions under “Managing Getting a decision is as easy Disagreement” (Slide 15) as stating it and having everyone agree. • Ifone person is blocking consensus, talk to them privately. Iftheir behavior is unreasonable, deal with that issue. • You may have to accept indecision. (Warning: ifanyone disagrees, Make sure partipants understand the you don’t have consensus. consequences ofindecision, and ask Go back to discussion.) for a decision one last time. • Do not resort to voting.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  28. 28. How to Run a MAKING DECISIONSGood Meeting 27 of34 IN A VOTING GROUP: Ifyou see consensus . . . Ifthere is an impasse . . . • You may try any ofthe “Managing Disagreement” tactics (Slide 15) or hold a vote. Hold a quick vote and be In scheduling votes, defer to done with the issue. Robert’s Rules ofOrder, ifapplicable, and to your sense offairness. • Consider trying for consensus anyway. • Make sure everyone at least understands the minority’s view.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  29. 29. How to Run a MAKING DECISIONSGood Meeting 28 of34 IF YOU’RE MAKING THE DECISIONS: Ifyou see consensus . . . Ifthere is an impasse . . . Ifyou agree, announce the • Consider trying the “Managing issue closed and move on. Disagreement” tactics (Slide 15). Ifyou disagree, you might: • Ifyou’re prepared to do so, simply • Take the group’s recommendation make the decision. under advisement. • Announce your decision, explain • Take the matter under advisement your reasoning, and move on. and move on with the meeting. • Tell the group you’re not convinced and offer to continue another time.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  30. 30. How to Run a MAKING DECISIONSGood Meeting 29 of34 REVISITING PAST DECISIONS: Generally, not a good idea. Whether to reopen a question is your decision.* Revisit recent decisions only if. . . • It becomes clear to you that a serious mistake has been made. • There is strong stakeholder disapproval that surprises you. • The rules require you to reopen discussion.Ifa decision was good enough last week,it’s probably good enough this week. * Except ifthe formal rules provide for reopening theConstantly revisiting decisions interferes issue, and the criteria set by those rules have been met.with the legitimacy ofany decision. Even in this case, you may have wide latitude.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  31. 31. How to Run a KEEPING RECORDSGood Meeting 30 of34 The Importance of MINUTES Minutes . . . • Remind you what happened at this meeting • Help group members who were absent get up to speed. • May provide information to outside stakeholders about your process. • Will help future groups like yours, or others who are trying to start or run a similar type ofprocess.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  32. 32. How to Run a KEEPING RECORDSGood Meeting 31 of34 Working with CONFIDENTIALITY Depending on your group, you may need to keep minutes secret, or redact them. In any case: • Minutes should always be distributed to all group members. Ifthey were privy to the meeting, they’re privy to the minutes. • Often, you may choose whether minutes are to be made public, and whether they are to be destroyed at the conclusion ofyour project. Be sure everyone understands your confidentiality rules!Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  33. 33. How to Run a MAKING DECISIONSGood Meeting 32 of34 Necessary Components of GOOD MINUTES Good minutes include: Good minutes do not include: ✗ • A list ofdecisions made, with vote records ifvoted. • Verbatim, paraphrased, chronological, or narrative records ofdiscussions. • Individual members’ responsibilities for the next meeting. • A concise summary ofany progress reports. — These are almost always useless, and • A brief list ofkey ideas from the — They make the important discussion (only ifneeded). items difficult to find.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  34. 34. How to Run a KEEPING RECORDSGood Meeting 33 of34 Minutes Are YOUR RESPONSIBILITY You will not usually take minutes yourself, but it’s your job to make sure they get done. Ifyour group doesn’t have staff, and nobody volunteers: • Try rotating “recorder” responsibilities among group members. • Ifall else fails, take minutes yourself, but . . . — Include only the basics. — Do not let yourselfget distracted from running the meeting. Minutes are important, but in a pinch, running the meeting is more important.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
  35. 35. How to Run a CONCLUSIONGood Meeting 34 of34 A GOOD MEETING: • Has clear ground rules. • Does not enable problematic behavior. • Begins, ends, and proceeds punctually. • Makes decisions, explicitly, legitimately, and fairly. • Emphasizes respect. • Is recorded, with minutes • Is well planned, with a that are easy to skim. clear agenda. • Is guided by an active • Leaves everyone with a chairperson. sense ofaccomplishment.Copyright © 2000, 2010 Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works License 3.0by Jeremy D. Sher Exact reproduction permitted with proper attribution.
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