Development  
Planning
My  usual  process

•

UX  -­‐>  Design  -­‐>  Development  -­‐>  QA  

•

Controls  the  process  and  helps  fix  costs, ...
Your  development  process
•

“You’ve  got  to  start  with  the  customer  experience  and  
work  back  towards  the  te...
Core  development  vs.  QA
•

Asking  product  quesOons  vs.  QA  quesOons.  

•

Product  quesOons:  “What  features  do ...
Don’t  waste  Ome.
•

Use  exisOng  pieces.  

•

Flummoxed?  Stuck  on  code?  

•

Find  someone  to  help.  

•

Find  ...
IntegraOng  UX
•

Find  a  way  to  quickly  sketch  and  test  your  user  
experience.  

•

You  can  do  this  in  cod...
Set  a  Omeline
•

A  Omeline  doesn’t  need  to  be  set  in  stone,  just  needs  
to  add  structure.  

•

You  have  ...
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NYU ITP Lean LaunchPad Development Planning

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NYU ITP Lean LaunchPad Development Planning

  1. 1. Development   Planning
  2. 2. My  usual  process • UX  -­‐>  Design  -­‐>  Development  -­‐>  QA   • Controls  the  process  and  helps  fix  costs,  to  a  certain   degree.   • You  don’t  have  the  resources  for  this,  financial  or   chronological.
  3. 3. Your  development  process • “You’ve  got  to  start  with  the  customer  experience  and   work  back  towards  the  technology.”  -­‐  Steve  Jobs   • Lay  infrastructure  that  you  know  you’ll  need.   • Iterate  on  customer-­‐facing  features  based  on  user   conversaOons.   • Make  firm  decisions.  Remain  flexible  on  open   quesOons,  but  resist  the  urge  to  go  back  and  rethink   decisions  you’ve  already  put  into  pracOce.
  4. 4. Core  development  vs.  QA • Asking  product  quesOons  vs.  QA  quesOons.   • Product  quesOons:  “What  features  do  you  need?”   This  is  mostly  what  you  have  been  doing.   • QA  quesOons  involve  showing  completed  features   and  looking  for  show-­‐stopping  problems:  Code  bugs,   UX  quirks,  etc.  The  details.   • Perfect  is  the  enemy  of  the  good.
  5. 5. Don’t  waste  Ome. • Use  exisOng  pieces.   • Flummoxed?  Stuck  on  code?   • Find  someone  to  help.   • Find  a  paid  resource.  What’s  your  Ome  worth?   • Find  a  work-­‐around.   • Talk  to  me.   • Don’t  reinvent  the  wheel  just  for  the  sake  of  it.
  6. 6. IntegraOng  UX • Find  a  way  to  quickly  sketch  and  test  your  user   experience.   • You  can  do  this  in  code  or  with  wireframes,  or   whatever  works.   • Solve  design  problems  at  this  stage  rather  that  in   Ome-­‐consuming  code.   • This  will  also  help  give  your  project  some  design   consistency.
  7. 7. Set  a  Omeline • A  Omeline  doesn’t  need  to  be  set  in  stone,  just  needs   to  add  structure.   • You  have  eight  weeks.  Ish.   • Work  big  to  small.   • You  might  want  to  set  aside  four  weeks  for  core   development  and  four  weeks  for  QA.  Or  something   like  that.
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