Presentation Principles: NAPHSIS Training Webinar 10-15-2013
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Presentation Principles: NAPHSIS Training Webinar 10-15-2013

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Presentation Principles presented 10-15-2013 for the NAPHSIS Training Webinar

Presentation Principles presented 10-15-2013 for the NAPHSIS Training Webinar

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Presentation Principles: NAPHSIS Training Webinar 10-15-2013 Presentation Principles: NAPHSIS Training Webinar 10-15-2013 Presentation Transcript

  • Tap, tap... “Is This Thing On?” Ideas for an Engaging Presentation Image  Flickr  by  pictureorpictures Wednesday, October 16, 13 Jennifer Tweedy NAPHSIS Webinar 10.15.2013 1
  • Things to keep in mind less clean engage clear Jennifer Tweedy Wednesday, October 16, 13 NAPHSIS Webinar 10.15.2013 2
  • Plan Take your time thinking it through Jennifer Tweedy NAPHSIS Webinar 10.15.2013 Wednesday, October 16, 13 Take your time thinking through the material that you’d like to present and research any gaps. You may spend 2/3 of your time in the planning phase. I find it very helpful to sketch thumbnails. You don’t need to be an artist to sketch out your ideas for your slides; I’m testament to this. The image here is from one of my own presentation planning sessions. No one but you needs to be able to make heads or tails of it at this stage. You’re simply getting your ideas out in thumbnail format to use later as you build out your digital presentation. 3
  • Choose a theme Appropriate for your material Jennifer Tweedy NAPHSIS Webinar 10.15.2013 4 Wednesday, October 16, 13 When you’re ready to begin building your presentation, select a theme that will be an effective vehicle for your information and media, one that will appropriately present your subject matter. The video playing on this slide is an example of a theme that I think is effective for delivering the subject matter. We recently launched a redesign of our employee Intranet. When presenting an overview of the process and new website to employees, we used a theme that displayed various pages of the website within the frame of a computer monitor and mobile phone, exactly how our employees experience the website.
  • Keep it simple Uncluttered Jennifer Tweedy NAPHSIS Webinar 10.15.2013 5 Wednesday, October 16, 13 If there is too much going on in your slide deck it’s going to be distracting and overwhelming to your audience. Think of your presentation as a room you’ve designed. You don’t want people tripping all over stuff and distracted by unnecessary items. You want it to be inviting and clean. You want people to sit down, relax, and appreciate the things that you’ve thoughtfully arranged.
  • Limit fonts 2-3 fonts is plenty Jennifer Tweedy NAPHSIS Webinar 10.15.2013 Wednesday, October 16, 13 More than two or three fonts and you can overwhelm your viewers and detract from the message. 6
  • Color is your friend Use contrast Jennifer Tweedy NAPHSIS Webinar 10.15.2013 7 Wednesday, October 16, 13 Colors that contrast, with a bold color for emphasis is effective in drawing attention to your content. Because we’re keeping text to a minimum we don’t have all the same readability concerns that we do for websites and traditional media, like light colored text on a dark background. We’re limiting the content on the slides to what is necessary to communicate our ideas and hold our viewers’ attention, and color can help us do that.
  • Create an engaging title Your title should grab attention & generate interest Jennifer Tweedy NAPHSIS Webinar 10.15.2013 Wednesday, October 16, 13 Spend some time developing an engaging title for your presentation. Incorporate concepts from the material that grabs. 8
  • Use visuals Photos Video Be creative! Jennifer Tweedy NAPHSIS Webinar 10.15.2013 9 Wednesday, October 16, 13 Including strong visuals in your presentation will engage your viewers much more than text alone. And video can work really well too. The imagery that you use for your presentation does not have to depict exactly what your talking about. You can be ironic or funny. As long as it associates the topic for the viewer you’ve done your job. The example on this slide supported a discussion about how members of several different internal teams collaborated for a common goal. The “players” playfully reference a super hero type of effort.
  • Text + visual Social media 10% RECALL Social media 65% RECALL Jennifer Tweedy NAPHSIS Webinar 10.15.2013 Wednesday, October 16, 13 And combining text with effective visuals will increase your audience’s retention of the material that your presenting. 72 hours after a presentation, recall of the information presented as text and visuals is 55% higher than the information presented as text alone. That’s pretty powerful stuff and a great tool in communicating the information that you’re passionate enough about to share with others. 10
  • Visual sources $ Jennifer Tweedy NAPHSIS Webinar 10.15.2013 11 Wednesday, October 16, 13 You don’t have to buy all the artwork that you use in a presentation. There are plenty of media sharing sites out there. Flickr is one of my favorites for finding creative imagery for presentations. Just pay attention to the rights specified with the work, as a lot of it is copyrighted. But plenty of the content is available for use with the proper attribution. For paid media, iStockPhoto.com has a ton of affordable photos and illustrations. I recommend staying away from clip art. Photographic imagery and quality illustration is more impactful. And remember that services like Google Images will return all media that fits a search term, including copyrighted material, so be careful what you use.
  • Less is more text Jennifer Tweedy NAPHSIS Webinar 10.15.2013 12 Wednesday, October 16, 13 Practice text brevity. Use the minimum text needed to make your point visually. This is often simply a keyword or phrase. Your audience is there to hear what you have to say; the presentation deck is a visual compliment to that, not a record of every word you say. Give your audience visually the text that they need to associate and retain your content and not a bit more.
  • Don’t use bullets Let go of the dot Jennifer Tweedy NAPHSIS Webinar 10.15.2013 •FRIENDS •DON’T LET •FRIENDS •USE •BULLET •POINTS 13 Wednesday, October 16, 13 Keep your content engaging with keywords and phrases, and visuals to back it up. If you feel like you need bullets to explain an idea, think about how many points you’re trying to present all at once and if that is the most effective way to present that information.
  • One idea per slide One idea, not one topic Jennifer Tweedy 1 NAPHSIS Webinar 10.15.2013 Wednesday, October 16, 13 There can be multiple ideas per topic, but what we’re going for is one idea per slide. For example, a few minutes ago we talked about keeping your presentation uncluttered and limiting the number of fonts used. These are two ideas: uncluttered and fonts, and therefore was presented as two slides. Although both ideas can fall under the topic of keeping things simple. A 10 minute presentation doesn’t have to be 5-10 slides. It can be 20-30 depending on your topic. Breaking your information into one idea per slide will make your content more digestible. 14
  • Keep it moving Rapid fire can be effective Jennifer Tweedy NAPHSIS Webinar 10.15.2013 4 15 Wednesday, October 16, 13 Rapid fire slides can be great way of communicating your material in digestible chunks. Take into account the forum of your presentation. For example, exercising a rapid fire technique over a conference bridge (like the one used to deliver this presentation) may not be the best idea. Especially because you can’t always load test the connection that you’ll be using when delivering to a large number of online users, it’s a good idea to avoid slides that rely on lightning quick execution or perfectly-timed animations, because chances are that what you’re seeing may not be what you’re audience is seeing at that same exact moment. When you’re in front of people face-to-face, you know the pulse of your audience. If you’re using humor, you know if it’s working. If the timing of your slides is a bit too fast or too slow, you can adjust on the fly. In person, rapid fire can be very effective keeping the presentation moving.
  • You move too Get out from behind the podium Image  Flickr  by  Andrew  Ferguson   Jennifer Tweedy NAPHSIS Webinar 10.15.2013 Wednesday, October 16, 13 Most presentation systems and projectors have a remote. You’ll engage your audience more if you’re not hiding behind a podium. 16
  • Look for ideas You don’t have to start from scratch Jennifer Tweedy NAPHSIS Webinar 10.15.2013 17 Wednesday, October 16, 13 You don’t have to reinvent the wheel with every presentation. Look around for ideas. You can reuse from your past presentations and research what others have done with similar topics to yours. And you don’t have to be a creative type to deliver a visually appealing presentation. There are lots of templates and themes for use, some for free built into the software your using and others available for purchase.
  • Identify the grab Highlight a couple interesting stats Use color Jennifer Tweedy NAPHSIS Webinar 10.15.2013 Wednesday, October 16, 13 A lot of you use data constantly and need to present that in an inviting format. It doesn’t have to be embedding an Excel spreadsheet in a PowerPoint. You can pull out a few of the most interesting metrics and use those to grab your audience. Remember that not everything needs to be on the slide. 18
  • Know your material Be comfy with your material Share what you’re passionate about Image  Flickr  by  jepoirrier Jennifer Tweedy NAPHSIS Webinar 10.15.2013 Wednesday, October 16, 13 Being comfortable with your material because it is something that you are personally familiar with will reflect in your command of the subject. 19
  • Know your audience Gather info about your audience Then speak to them Image  Flickr  by  Emily Jennifer Tweedy NAPHSIS Webinar 10.15.2013 Wednesday, October 16, 13 A topic can be presented a multitude of different ways. It’s important to know who your speaking to and gather information about their needs and experience with the content that you’ll be presenting ahead of time. Deliver to their expectations. That said, there is bound to be varied experience among your audience and this is to be expected. Speak to the target demographic. You can always expand upon or break down the material in Q & A with your audience. 20
  • Start a conversation It’s about engaging with people Image  Flickr  by  Ron  aka  “Blue”  Aldaman Jennifer Tweedy NAPHSIS Webinar 10.15.2013 Wednesday, October 16, 13 Presenting is about talking with people and getting somebody else as passionate about your subject as you are. 21
  • Animate with caution Save the airsick bags for the plane Image  Flickr  by  Mar?n  Abegglen   Jennifer Tweedy NAPHSIS Webinar 10.15.2013 Wednesday, October 16, 13 Animation can increase audience engagement, but use it conservatively and keep it consistent. 22
  • Practice After all the work planning & designing don’t present cold Jennifer Tweedy NAPHSIS Webinar 10.15.2013 23 Wednesday, October 16, 13 This includes testing your technical equipment. You may think that you’re comfortable with the material after all the time you’ve put into it, but it will know doubt be very different standing, moving and speaking it in front of people. A couple dry runs through your presentation will go a long way when it’s go time.
  • Questions? @jennifertweedy | jennifertweedy@gmail.com 24 Wednesday, October 16, 13