iBT TOEFL
Sample of e-learning materials
for blended 10-week course
Created by Jennifer Paz
See attached lesson plan for a...
Vocabulary Partner Practice                                             Next section


Exercise 12, pp. 214-215


Directio...
Quaint (adj.)                                               Back to list




charming in an old-fashioned way,
picturesque...
Back to list
Ragged (adj.)
torn, tattered, worn

The ragged clothing typical of the Great
Depression has now become very f...
Back to list
Rugged (adj.)
(1) jagged, rough, uneven; (2) strong, sturdy

The Swiss Alps are rugged but beautiful mountain...
Back to list
rural (adj.)
agricultural

If you enjoy rural locations, you should visit Wales.
Back to list
risky (adj.)
dangerous, hazardous, treacherous

I could never go hang gliding. It’s just too risky!
Back to list
radiant (adj.)
bright, shiny, glowing

Nothing is as radiant as our beautiful sun!
Back to list
rip (v.)
tear, cut, slash

It’s very easy to rip a piece of paper.
It’s a little harder to rip clothing.
Back to list
Reliable (adj.)
dependable, trustworthy

I love my car. It’s very reliable. I’ve never
had a single problem w...
Back to list
Refine (v.)
improve, process, purify

Oil is refined in order to produce gasoline.
Back to list
Remarkable (adj.)
incredible, amazing, extraordinary, noteworthy

The Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco is ...
Back to list
Relish (v.)
enjoy, savor, like

Ice cream is a treat that most people relish
quite a bit, particularly childr...
Back to list
Rash (adj.)
thoughtless, careless, reckless

Many accidents are the result of a rash decision,
such as runnin...
Back to list
Reckless (adj.)
careless, rash

It is very reckless to cross train tracks when
the safety gates are coming do...
Back to list
Refuge (n.)
shelter, haven, retreat

Everyone needs a place of refuge where problems
can be contemplated or f...
Review Exercise: Speaking                                                Next section


Lessons 19-20, Tasks 5-6




Direc...
Review Exercise: Speaking
Lesson 19, Task 5 Quiz



Question:
How should you prepare for and respond to
Speaking Task 5: O...
Review Exercise: Speaking
Lesson 19, Task 5 Quiz



Question:
How should you prepare for and respond to
Speaking Task 5: O...
Review Exercise: Speaking
Lesson 19, Task 5 Quiz



Question:
How should you prepare for and respond to
Speaking Task 5: O...
Review Exercise: Speaking
Lesson 19, Task 5 Quiz



Question:
How should you prepare for and respond to
Speaking Task 5: O...
Review Exercise: Speaking
Lesson 19, Task 5 Quiz



Question:
How should you prepare for and respond to
Speaking Task 5: O...
Review Exercise: Speaking
Lesson 20, Task 6 Quiz



Question:
How should you prepare for and respond to
Speaking Task 6: S...
Review Exercise: Speaking
Lesson 20, Task 6 Quiz



Question:
How should you prepare for and respond to
Speaking Task 6: S...
Review Exercise: Speaking
Lesson 20, Task 6 Quiz



Question:
How should you prepare for and respond to
Speaking Task 6: S...
Review Exercise: Speaking
Lesson 20, Task 6 Quiz



Question:
How should you prepare for and respond to
Speaking Task 6: S...
Review Exercise: Speaking
Lesson 20, Task 6 Quiz



Question:
How should you prepare for and respond to
Speaking Task 6: S...
Next section

Guide to iBT Writing:
The Integrated Writing Task
Summary of Lessons 21-24 (pp. 560-645) of “The
Complete Gu...
iBT Writing Section:
Format Overview

This is always the last section. It tests your
ability to produce clear, well-organi...
Lessons 21-24:
Writing the Integrated Task


This is what we will go over today.

     Lessons 21-22 teach you to:
     • ...
Integrated Writing Task:
Reading and Listening Passages



The reading and listening passages will usually
discuss opposit...
Integrated Writing Task:
Sample Questions (Most Typical)




Most questions will ask you to show how the
information in th...
Integrated Writing Task:
Sample Questions (3 Other Types)

Other question types may ask you to:
(a) show how points are re...
Integrated Writing Task:
Different than Standard Essays




Unlike the academic essays you write for college
courses, in t...
Basic Requirements                               Next section


for any Academic Essay
Quick Quiz! Match the term to its d...
Basic Requirements
for any Academic Essay
Quick Quiz! Match the term to its definition.

                        combining...
Basic Requirements
for any Academic Essay
Quick Quiz! Match the term to its definition.

                        combining...
Basic Requirements
for any Academic Essay
Quick Quiz! Match the term to its definition.

                        combining...
Basic Requirements
for any Academic Essay
Great job! How about a few more tips on these?

                      combining ...
Summarizing and Paraphrasing:
A Few Tips


Read pages 605-609 at home for more
details and examples.

 Summarizing = conde...
Citing and Synthesizing:
A Few Tips




Read pages 609-613 at home for more
details and examples.

 Citing = identifying t...
The Integrated Writing Task:                     Next section


Sample Essays and Scoring Assignment
Let’s read through th...
The Integrated Writing Task:
Using the Writing Process

Since you only have 20 minutes to write
(after you read and listen...
The Integrated Essay:                                             Next section


Key Content and Organization




How can ...
The Integrated Essay:                                             Back to list   Next section


Writing the Introduction

...
The Integrated Essay:                                        Back to list   Next section


Writing the Body Paragraphs



...
The Integrated Essay:                                            Back to list   Next section


Writing the Conclusion




...
The Integrated Essay:                             Next section


What to Check at the End




Take 2-3 minutes to look for...
First Check:                                                          Back to list   Next section


Content & Organization...
Second Check:                                                 Back to list   Next section


Grammatical Errors




Focus o...
Third Check:                                                 Back to list   Next section


Mechanical Errors




Focus on ...
In-Class Practice for Lessons 21-24:
Integrated Writing Preview Test, p. 579-581
Directions: Open Notepad (in Accessories)...
Writing the Integrated Essay:
Remember the Following Steps


Please print your essay and turn it in before you
leave the l...
Homework Assignments:
Due Before Next Class




Be sure to get the handout for instructions on
completing one additional I...
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Transcript of "iBT TOEFL Sample Wtg Blended Presentation"

  1. 1. iBT TOEFL Sample of e-learning materials for blended 10-week course Created by Jennifer Paz See attached lesson plan for additional details © 2010
  2. 2. Vocabulary Partner Practice Next section Exercise 12, pp. 214-215 Directions: In pairs, take turns discussing these items for 15 minutes. You may use any notes you have prepared. 1. Name a place that you consider quaint. 2. Name something that can be ragged. 3. Describe the difference between a rugged and a rural landscape. 4. Name something that you think is a very risky thing to do. 5. Name something that can be radiant. 6. Name something that you can rip. 7. Name something you have that is very reliable. 8. Tell one way you can refine your English. 9. Name a creation (man-made or natural) that you consider remarkable. 10. Name a food that you relish. 11. When would it be rash or reckless to text someone? 12. Where do you find refuge when you need to get away from the world?
  3. 3. Quaint (adj.) Back to list charming in an old-fashioned way, picturesque, curious Mont St. Michel is a quaint city off the coast of France.
  4. 4. Back to list Ragged (adj.) torn, tattered, worn The ragged clothing typical of the Great Depression has now become very fashionable.
  5. 5. Back to list Rugged (adj.) (1) jagged, rough, uneven; (2) strong, sturdy The Swiss Alps are rugged but beautiful mountains.
  6. 6. Back to list rural (adj.) agricultural If you enjoy rural locations, you should visit Wales.
  7. 7. Back to list risky (adj.) dangerous, hazardous, treacherous I could never go hang gliding. It’s just too risky!
  8. 8. Back to list radiant (adj.) bright, shiny, glowing Nothing is as radiant as our beautiful sun!
  9. 9. Back to list rip (v.) tear, cut, slash It’s very easy to rip a piece of paper. It’s a little harder to rip clothing.
  10. 10. Back to list Reliable (adj.) dependable, trustworthy I love my car. It’s very reliable. I’ve never had a single problem with it.
  11. 11. Back to list Refine (v.) improve, process, purify Oil is refined in order to produce gasoline.
  12. 12. Back to list Remarkable (adj.) incredible, amazing, extraordinary, noteworthy The Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco is a remarkable feat of engineering.
  13. 13. Back to list Relish (v.) enjoy, savor, like Ice cream is a treat that most people relish quite a bit, particularly children.
  14. 14. Back to list Rash (adj.) thoughtless, careless, reckless Many accidents are the result of a rash decision, such as running a red light.
  15. 15. Back to list Reckless (adj.) careless, rash It is very reckless to cross train tracks when the safety gates are coming down.
  16. 16. Back to list Refuge (n.) shelter, haven, retreat Everyone needs a place of refuge where problems can be contemplated or forgotten for awhile.
  17. 17. Review Exercise: Speaking Next section Lessons 19-20, Tasks 5-6 Directions: Discuss the following question with a partner for 5 minutes. There will be a True/False class quiz next. Question: How should you prepare for and respond to the last two Integrated Speaking Tasks? Task 5: Opinion of Problem/Solution Task 6: Summary
  18. 18. Review Exercise: Speaking Lesson 19, Task 5 Quiz Question: How should you prepare for and respond to Speaking Task 5: Opinion of Problem/Solution? T or F You should take notes using a T-Chart to separate the speakers. T or F You should not waste time preparing. Just begin speaking immediately. T or F You should discuss the man’s problem first, then the woman’s problem. T or F You must choose which solution is best and give two reasons why.
  19. 19. Review Exercise: Speaking Lesson 19, Task 5 Quiz Question: How should you prepare for and respond to Speaking Task 5: Opinion of Problem/Solution? True! You should take notes using a T-Chart to separate the speakers. T or F You should not waste time preparing. Just begin speaking immediately. T or F You should discuss the man’s problem first, then the woman’s problem. T or F You must choose which solution is best and give two reasons why.
  20. 20. Review Exercise: Speaking Lesson 19, Task 5 Quiz Question: How should you prepare for and respond to Speaking Task 5: Opinion of Problem/Solution? True! You should take notes using a T-Chart to separate the speakers. False… You have 20 seconds to prepare. Wait for the 2nd beep to start speaking. T or F You should discuss the man’s problem first, then the woman’s problem. T or F You must choose which solution is best and give two reasons why.
  21. 21. Review Exercise: Speaking Lesson 19, Task 5 Quiz Question: How should you prepare for and respond to Speaking Task 5: Opinion of Problem/Solution? True! You should take notes using a T-Chart to separate the speakers. False… You have 20 seconds to prepare. Wait for the 2nd beep to start speaking. False… Only 1 problem is discussed (question tells whose). Tell who says what. T or F You must choose which solution is best and give two reasons why.
  22. 22. Review Exercise: Speaking Lesson 19, Task 5 Quiz Question: How should you prepare for and respond to Speaking Task 5: Opinion of Problem/Solution? True! You should take notes using a T-Chart to separate the speakers. False… You have 20 seconds to prepare. Wait for the 2nd beep to start speaking. False… Only 1 problem is discussed (question tells whose). Tell who says what. True! You must choose which solution is best and give two reasons why.
  23. 23. Review Exercise: Speaking Lesson 20, Task 6 Quiz Question: How should you prepare for and respond to Speaking Task 6: Summary? T or F You should take notes using a T-Chart to separate the speakers. T or F You should try to listen for main ideas and important details. T or F You should talk fast so you can repeat everything that you heard. T or F You should focus on only the most important information.
  24. 24. Review Exercise: Speaking Lesson 20, Task 6 Quiz Question: How should you prepare for and respond to Speaking Task 6: Summary? False… An outline format for your notes will work best for this task. T or F You should try to listen for main ideas and important details. T or F You should talk fast so you can repeat everything that you heard. T or F You should focus on only the most important information.
  25. 25. Review Exercise: Speaking Lesson 20, Task 6 Quiz Question: How should you prepare for and respond to Speaking Task 6: Summary? False… An outline format for your notes will work best for this task. True! You should try to listen for main ideas and important details. T or F You should talk fast so you can repeat everything that you heard. T or F You should focus on only the most important information.
  26. 26. Review Exercise: Speaking Lesson 20, Task 6 Quiz Question: How should you prepare for and respond to Speaking Task 6: Summary? False… An outline format for your notes will work best for this task. True! You should try to listen for main ideas and important details False… Speak normally. A summary should be shorter than the original. T or F You should focus on only the most important information.
  27. 27. Review Exercise: Speaking Lesson 20, Task 6 Quiz Question: How should you prepare for and respond to Speaking Task 6: Summary? False… An outline format for your notes will work best for this task. True! You should try to listen for main ideas and important details False… Speak normally. A summary should be shorter than the original. True! You should focus on only the most important information.
  28. 28. Next section Guide to iBT Writing: The Integrated Writing Task Summary of Lessons 21-24 (pp. 560-645) of “The Complete Guide to the TOEFL: iBT Edition” by Bruce Rogers, © 2010 Heinle.
  29. 29. iBT Writing Section: Format Overview This is always the last section. It tests your ability to produce clear, well-organized academic writing. Task Types and Timing: There are 2 different writing tasks: One is “integrated” and one is “independent”. For the Integrated Task: You read for 3 minutes, listen to a 2-minute lecture, then have 20 minutes to write an essay. For the Independent Task: You will be given a topic and will have 30 minutes to write your opinion about that topic. Page 561 has a screen shot showing the tools available in the writing section.
  30. 30. Lessons 21-24: Writing the Integrated Task This is what we will go over today. Lessons 21-22 teach you to: • understand the Integrated Task passages and question types • take notes on the reading and listening passages • find the main idea and key points and plan your essay • summarize the material you read and heard using paraphrases and citations • synthesize the material you read and heard in order to answer the question Lessons 23-24 teach you to: • write clearly (use correct grammar, vocabulary, and organization) • organize your essay • use transition signals where appropriate to connect your ideas • edit your essay for content, coherence, grammar, and mechanics
  31. 31. Integrated Writing Task: Reading and Listening Passages The reading and listening passages will usually discuss opposite points of view about the same general ideas. TIP: Follow the order in the reading and arrange the lecturer’s points to match. Reading Passage: Lecture: Positive Point 1 Corresponding Negative Point 1 Positive Point 2 Corresponding Negative Point 2 Positive Point 3 Corresponding Negative Point 3
  32. 32. Integrated Writing Task: Sample Questions (Most Typical) Most questions will ask you to show how the information in the reading passage contradicts (or “refutes”) what you heard in the lecture. Here are two sample questions from page 570: (Opposition) Question 1: “Summarize the main points made in the lecture that you just heard, discussing how they cast doubt on points made in the reading. You can refer to the reading passage as you write.” (Opposition) Question 2: “Summarize the main points made in the lecture that you just heard, explaining how they differ from the points made in the reading. You can refer to the reading passage as you write.”
  33. 33. Integrated Writing Task: Sample Questions (3 Other Types) Other question types may ask you to: (a) show how points are related, (b) explain how a problem could be solved, or (c) describe a cause-effect relationship. Here are three sample questions from page 570-571: (Illustration) Question: “Summarize the main points made in the lecture that you just heard, explaining how they illustrate the points made in the reading. You can refer… .” (Solution) Question: “Summarize the main points made in the lecture that you just heard, explaining how they may solve the problem described in the reading. You can refer… .” (Cause-Effect) Question: “Summarize the main points made in the lecture that you just heard, explaining how they are the results of the event described in the reading. You can refer… .”
  34. 34. Integrated Writing Task: Different than Standard Essays Unlike the academic essays you write for college courses, in this essay you should not include your opinion anywhere. This means: Use the third person: “He” or “She”. Do not use “I” or “You”. Only discuss what the author or lecturer has said, not what you believe or what you have experienced, even if it is similar. They are not testing your knowledge. They are testing your ability to organize “corresponding information” from two sources and synthesize it into an original piece of writing.
  35. 35. Basic Requirements Next section for any Academic Essay Quick Quiz! Match the term to its definition. combining information Paraphrasing from different sources identifying the source Citing of information saying the same thing Summarizing with different words condensing Synthesizing information
  36. 36. Basic Requirements for any Academic Essay Quick Quiz! Match the term to its definition. combining information Paraphrasing from different sources identifying the source Citing of information saying the same thing Summarizing with different words condensing Synthesizing information
  37. 37. Basic Requirements for any Academic Essay Quick Quiz! Match the term to its definition. combining information Paraphrasing from different sources identifying the source Citing of information saying the same thing Summarizing with different words condensing Synthesizing information
  38. 38. Basic Requirements for any Academic Essay Quick Quiz! Match the term to its definition. combining information Paraphrasing from different sources identifying the source Citing of information saying the same thing Summarizing with different words condensing Synthesizing information
  39. 39. Basic Requirements for any Academic Essay Great job! How about a few more tips on these? combining information Paraphrasing from different sources identifying the source Citing of information saying the same thing Summarizing with different words condensing Synthesizing information
  40. 40. Summarizing and Paraphrasing: A Few Tips Read pages 605-609 at home for more details and examples. Summarizing = condensing information. Summaries are shorter than the original. Explain main points and key details only (not everything). Paraphrasing = saying the same thing with different words. Paraphrases are about the same length as the original. Tips for paraphrasing: 1. Never copy more than 3 words in a row. 2. Change word forms. 3. Use synonyms (except for technical terms). 4. Change the grammar. 5. Reverse negatives. 6. Change the word order. 7. Change the transitions (signal words).
  41. 41. Citing and Synthesizing: A Few Tips Read pages 609-613 at home for more details and examples. Citing = identifying the source of information. Tips for citing: 1. Introduce points from the text with, “the author states/claims, etc.…” 2. Introduce points from the listening passage with, “the lecturer states/claims, etc.…” Synthesizing = combining information from different sources. Tips for synthesizing: 1. Use transition words showing contrast (as appropriate). 2. Use transition words/adverbs/verbs showing addition (as appropriate). 3. Each time the source changes, use a citation that clarifies where the information came from.
  42. 42. The Integrated Writing Task: Next section Sample Essays and Scoring Assignment Let’s read through the sample responses on pp. 574-576 and discuss the scores given. At home, study pp. 573 and do the “Exercise: Scoring the Response” on pp. 576-578. Turn in the Exercise by email before our next class.
  43. 43. The Integrated Writing Task: Using the Writing Process Since you only have 20 minutes to write (after you read and listen), the best way to divide your time is as follows: Pre-Writing: Spend 2-3 minutes 1. Read the question carefully. 2. Look at your notes and circle points that answer the question. 3. Make an outline by numbering the circled points in logical order. Actual Writing (Typing): Spend about 15 minutes Revision: Spend 2-3 minutes 1. Compare your outline to your writing: Did you miss anything? Add the idea in 1 sentence. Did you add something extra? Delete it. 2. Check your grammar/mechanics, esp. subject-verb agreement.
  44. 44. The Integrated Essay: Next section Key Content and Organization How can you write a quality essay in so little time? What can they possibly expect? Introduction: How might this differ from other academic essays? Body Paragraphs: How can you quickly organize these? Conclusion: If you can’t include your opinion, what should you write?
  45. 45. The Integrated Essay: Back to list Next section Writing the Introduction You only need to write 2-3 sentences. Sentence 1: Clearly state the topic (main idea) of the reading and the lecture (which is always the same). An interesting “hook” is not necessary. Sentence 2-3: Summarize what the author of the article claims about the topic. Use an appropriate transition, then summarize how the lecturer’s point of view relates to* the author’s point of view. *Remember: There are various relationships possible.
  46. 46. The Integrated Essay: Back to list Next section Writing the Body Paragraphs A quick outline will keep you on track. To prepare your outline: 1. Circle 3 main points in your reading notes. 2. Circle 3 related points in your lecture notes. 3. Number both sets of points in the order presented in the reading. When you write each body paragraph, discuss 1 point made in the reading then the 1 related point made in the lecture. 1. Be sure to use a transition when you switch to the lecture. 2. Try to present the same amount of information from each source, so each paragraph seems “balanced”.
  47. 47. The Integrated Essay: Back to list Next section Writing the Conclusion You only need to write 1-2 sentences. Choose One: 1. Paraphrase any existing conclusion in the reading or the lecture. 2. Summarize the main points you discussed. Remember: 1. Do not give your own opinion. 2. Do not offer a suggestion, solution, or prediction.
  48. 48. The Integrated Essay: Next section What to Check at the End Take 2-3 minutes to look for 3 types of errors. First Check: Content & Organization Second Check: Grammatical Errors Third Check: Mechanical Errors
  49. 49. First Check: Back to list Next section Content & Organization This is the most important part of your essay. Does your introduction (1) state the topic, (2) explain the author’s point of view, and (3) explain the lecturer’s point of view? Do your 3 body paragraphs compare the reading and the lecture by discussing only one main point (from each source) in each paragraph? • Do you present a balanced explanation of each author’s point of view? • Do you cite your sources and paraphrase the information? Does your conclusion summarize the main points of the reading and the lecture? Is there any “outside information” or your opinion anywhere in your essay?
  50. 50. Second Check: Back to list Next section Grammatical Errors Focus on clarifying meaning. See pp. 706-729 for exercises to practice each of these areas. Sentences: Look for fragments and run-on sentences; combine or split them. Verbs: Check tense, subject-verb agreement, and active vs. passive form. Pronouns and nouns: Check agreement and singular vs. plural usage. Word forms: Look for correct endings for adjectives, adverbs, nouns, etc.
  51. 51. Third Check: Back to list Next section Mechanical Errors Focus on clarity, not perfection. Even a high- scoring essay may have some errors. Paragraphing: Indent each paragraph or skip a line between paragraphs. Punctuation: Be sure every sentence has an end mark. Capitalize the basics. Spelling: Only worry about “standard” English words, not technical terms.
  52. 52. In-Class Practice for Lessons 21-24: Integrated Writing Preview Test, p. 579-581 Directions: Open Notepad (in Accessories). Turn to page 580, but do not start reading until instructed to begin by the narrator. You will hear general directions first. Ready? Click to play audio
  53. 53. Writing the Integrated Essay: Remember the Following Steps Please print your essay and turn it in before you leave the lab today. Click here for Homework. 1. Make an outline by circling and numbering main ideas and key details in your T-chart to put them in a logical order. 2. Organize your 5-paragraph essay by writing: • 1-3 sentence introduction: State main topic, then point of view of author vs. lecturer. • 2-3 body paragraphs: One paragraph for each main point compared (synthesize the author and lecturer’s points of view). • 1-2 sentence conclusion: Quickly summarize the main conflict/issue. Do not offer your opinion or predictions, etc. 3. Check your essay for content, grammar, and mechanics.
  54. 54. Homework Assignments: Due Before Next Class Be sure to get the handout for instructions on completing one additional Integrated Essay. 1. Integrated Writing Task Practice: One additional essay (Ex. 21.1). 2. Read Guide to Independent Writing in textbook, pp. 646-656. 3. Scan Writing Lessons 25-28 in textbook, pp. 658-701. 4. Vocabulary Exercise 13: Study word list in textbook, pp. 216-217.

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