Building Writers and Feedback TLT13

424 views

Published on

Presentation from this year's Teaching and Learning Takeover at the University of Southampton. Sharing ideas adapted from Penny Langford's building writers plan and also some feedback techniques for ks3 and ks4.

Published in: Education, News & Politics
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
424
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
36
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Building Writers and Feedback TLT13

  1. 1. Building Writers and Functional Feedback Jennifer Ludgate English Teacher @MissJLud
  2. 2. What do we mean by gap? How do we and our students know what success looks like? ‘Closing the gap between where students are and what success looks like is the most powerful way we can fast Why is ‘closing What does it forward learning.’ the gap’ mean to ‘fast Visible Learning for Teachers, John Hattie powerful? forward learning’?
  3. 3. Can we develop the knowledge and skills necessary to successfully complete the learning without wasting time or moving too quickly?
  4. 4. Building Writers at KS3 S Can we develop the knowledge and skills necessary to successfully complete the learning without
  5. 5. We can build writers and close the gap in their work through: Can we develop the knowledge and skills necessary to successfully complete the
  6. 6. What would writers have to say? The story teller ? ? The blogger The speech writer The poet
  7. 7. Modelling the process, not just the finished article • Write in front of students! • Talk about our problems as writers • Model re-reading and writing as part of the process – avoid spiralling out of control! • Recognise just how hard the task may be – and how long it will take! • Reflect on our own writing so that we can figure out our own answers to the difficult issues of teaching writing.
  8. 8. Share the process with your students • • • • Do you ever talk aloud as you write? Are you aware of talking in your head as you write? Do you stop mid-sentence and work out what you are going to say next? So…do you share these experiences with the writers in your class? Resource bank: Long term memory Planning Creating Reviewing The reasons for writing: Context
  9. 9. Talk like a book Speak aloud your first line Talking: No writing allowed Correct mistakes easily Speaking vs Writing Voice
  10. 10. Pupil Autonomy “I choose what I write” For the duration of the project pupils were called ‘writers’. They sat in their writing groups and shared ideas. Further lessons included: research lessons, self assessment, no pens allowed and public critique.
  11. 11. So can we develop the knowledge and skills necessary to successfully complete the learning without wasting time or moving too quickly? Develop – through the use of modelling, talk and pupil autonomy both knowledge and skills were developed. Successfully - confidence levels increased, pupils shared ideas with each other with ease over the two week period, they still talk about that piece of work now plus their levels increased. Wasting time/moving too quickly – Time wasn’t wasted it was used wisely. A two week project (7-8 hours) ensured the gaps were filled slowly. Students were able to see that moving quickly does not necessarily equal success.
  12. 12. What opportunities do we build into our lessons and schemes of work for pupils to choose what they write? What topics/schemes/subjects/ circumstances would allow pupils to improve their writing through talk? How can pupil autonomy be used in my subject/class? Add your post it notes to the relevant sheet. Can any of the ‘building writers’ ideas be used with a class/topic you teach? Teach Share Collaborate
  13. 13. Building on Feedback A range of techniques I have used to engage and encourage feedback in lessons with KS3 and KS4 pupils.
  14. 14. Feedback Findings Providing effective feedback is challenging. Research suggests that it should: • • • • • be specific, accurate and clear compare what a learner is doing right now with what they have done wrong before encourage and support further effort (getting a balance between support and challenge) and be given sparingly so that it is meaningful (as too much feedback can stop learners working out what they need to do for themselves). provide specific guidance on how to improve and not just tell students when they are wrong. Wider research suggests the feedback should be about complex or challenging tasks or goals as this is likely to emphasise the importance of effort and perseverance as well as be more valued by the pupils. Feedback can come from other peers as well as adults. From the Education Endowment Foundation (2012)
  15. 15. Functional Feedback at KS4 Improving Reading: Using quotations effectively To get higher marks, you need to: Name: Improving Reading: Using quotations effectively To get higher marks, you need to: Name: Use quotations as examples in your work. Use quotations as examples in your work. Use at least one quotation for every point that you make. Use at least one quotation for every point that you make. Use quotation marks to show it is from another text. (‘ and ’ ) Use quotation marks to show it is from another text. (‘ and ’ ) Choose a quotation which fits in with your point – this may mean it shows how a character says their dialogue. For example: „“I can pass this exam.” Tim said confidently.‟ Choose a quotation which fits in with your point – this may mean it shows how a character says their dialogue. For example: „“I can pass this exam.” Tim said confidently.‟ Rewrite a paragraph and try to improve the quotations you use. Rewrite a paragraph and try to improve the quotations you use. Success Criteria (not previously hit) A section to rewrite using the above guidance – named by you or pupil Monitoring response – a confidence boost or a sign that more input is needed. · Read the paragraph again and check that you have used a quotation. · Read the paragraph again and check that you have used a quotation. · Check that quotation marks have been used correctly (words within the quotation marks. All punctuation copied exactly from the text). · Check that quotation marks have been used correctly (words within the quotation marks. All punctuation copied exactly from the text). Add a sentence opener leading into your quotation: ‘The word ‘…..’ is effective because…. Or ‘The writer has used the phrase ‘……..’ to imply…’ Add a sentence opener leading into your quotation: ‘The word ‘…..’ is effective because…. Or ‘The writer has used the phrase ‘……..’ to imply…’
  16. 16. • Your targets may feel like ghosts coming back to haunt you time and time again! • One way to make your ghosts disappear is by tackling them and showing them you’re not scared! • Read through your target and tackle it until it disappears!
  17. 17. The Results: Year 9 Pupil responses to ‘Give your opinion to the ghostly feedback sheets:’ ‘Makes responding easier’ ‘It means you have to do it!’ ‘It is quite clear – I like them when they are cut up.’ ‘Bang and the target’s gone’ Forces me to think about my feedback carefully! How do I phrase my feedback so that it doesn’t confuse pupils or demotivate! Ie. Think about the difference between an instruction and a question
  18. 18. Reflective Time (like Hammer time but with tighter trousers) Are my expectations for feedback clear to my class? Aside from marking books and verbal feedback, what other forms of functional feedback could you introduce? Do my pupils interact with their feedback? Is it developing their learning or does it merely show they can read?
  19. 19. Jennifer Ludgate English Teacher @MissJLud - littlemisslud.wordpress.com/

×