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Elements of Design
 

Elements of Design

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A presentation about the essential elements that comprise the building blocks of graphic design.

A presentation about the essential elements that comprise the building blocks of graphic design.

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    Elements of Design Elements of Design Presentation Transcript

    • The Elements of DesignWhy are These Elements Important to Design? The elements of design are the fundamental building blocks of any composition. These pieces work together to form a unified composition, and when utilized successfully, create a strong, dynamic visual layout. The designer uses these elements as tools that control how a message is delivered to an audience. These principles can be applied to fine art, photography and graphic design.
    • The Elements of Design LineLine: One of most important element of design, line defines a subject s formor shape on a flat, two-dimensional surface. Lines can be thick or thin,smooth or jagged, rigid and mechanical or organic and hand drawn.The quality of a line has the ability to express psychological characteristics ofa composition to an audience.
    • The Elements of Design LineLine: One of most important element of design, line defines a subject s formor shape on a flat, two-dimensional surface. Lines can be thick or thin,smooth or jagged, rigid and mechanical or organic and hand drawn.The quality of a line has the ability to express psychological characteristics ofa composition to an audience.
    • The Elements of Design LineLine: One of most important element of design, line defines a subject s formor shape on a flat, two-dimensional surface. Lines can be thick or thin,smooth or jagged, rigid and mechanical or organic and hand drawn.The quality of a line has the ability to express psychological characteristics ofa composition to an audience.
    • The Elements of Design Figure and GroundAlso called positive and negative shapes. The actual shapes in a compositionare called positive/ figure shapes. The shape that is created as the white spaceflows around the forms on a page is referred to as ground or negative space.White space on a page helps the eye to flow through a composition and can helpto develop visual interest in a composition.
    • The Elements of Design Scale and ProportionScale refers to refer to the size of elements in a composition.Proportion refers to the relative size of objects in relation to each other.Size only takes on meaning when compared to other objects of different sizes.
    • The Elements of Design Scale and ProportionAnother way to talk about scale is to consider the size and scale of elements withina design or pattern. In this case, proportions of elements to each other and to theoverall dimensions of a canvas that they are created on.Changing the size of elements within a composition changes the overall impactand look of a piece of art.
    • The Elements of Design Scale and Proportion http://www.magmaweb.com/vwmarketplace/posters/vwbig022702.jpgUnexpected ScaleWhen objects are shown as overly exaggerated or reduced in size, this effect iscalled unexpected scale. Unexpected scale is often used in advertising in orderto draw our attention to a product.Large and small scale forms can be combined together in a composition to createa dramatic effect.
    • The Elements of Design Scale and Proportion http://www.oldenburgvanbruggen.com/Unexpected ScaleWhen objects are shown as overly exaggerated or reduced in size, this effect iscalled unexpected scale. Unexpected scale is often used in advertising in orderto draw our attention to a product.Large and small scale forms can be combined together in a composition to createa dramatic effect.
    • The Elements of Design Texture and PatternPattern is often associated with printed fabrics, such as plaids, polka dots,and florals. Pattern is defined as a repetitive design, with the same motifappearing over and over again.Texture is the tactile quality of a surface. It can be actual or implied in twodimensional form. Texture can be rough or smooth, solid or porous, coarseor polished.Pattern and texture work together to create a sense of visual interest.
    • The Elements of Design Texture and PatternPattern is often associated with printed fabrics, such as plaids, polka dots,and florals. Pattern is defined as a repetitive design, with the same motifappearing over and over again.Texture is the tactile quality of a surface. It can be actual or implied in twodimensional form. Texture can be rough or smooth, solid or porous, coarseor polished.Pattern and texture work together to create a sense of visual interest.
    • The Elements of Design Actual Vs. Implied TextureActual texture refers to a texture that we can reach out and physically feel.Implied texture refers to texture created on a two dimensional surface thatactually has a smooth surface when touched. Example- a photo or painting.
    • The Elements of Design Rhythm and RepetitionRhythm is the repetition of design elements at regular intervals. This helpsto give a composition visual harmony by creating unity in a layout.Examples include the repetition of similar shapes, colors or textures.
    • The Elements of Design DirectionThe lines and forms that lead the viewer s eye through a composition arereferred to as direction.Direction can help to create flow of how information is processed.
    • The Elements of Design WeightWeight refers to the contrast in thick and thin lines within a layout.Variation in visual weight can add interest to selected areas of acomposition and can help draw the viewer s eye through a piece of art,emphasizing important areas of information and deemphasizing others.
    • The Elements of Design ContrastContrast refers to any variation between elements within a composition, such asdifference in weight, size and texture of a composition.
    • The Elements of Design BalanceBalance refers to the distribution of visual weight within a composition.Lack of balance disturbs the harmony of a composition.A work that is unbalanced visually creates tension.
    • The Elements of Design Symmetrical vs. Asymmetrical BalanceSymmetrical Balance is when elements are arranged in a mirror image ofone another on the vertical or horizontal axis of a page. Also known as formal balance. This type of balance is often seen in the architecture ofbuildings.This is the most familiar type of balance to the viewer.
    • The Elements of Design Symmetrical vs. Asymmetrical BalanceAsymmetrical balance occurs when elements in a design are notarranged as mirror images on a page. Also known as informal balance.Can be created through the use of value, texture and size of elementswithin a composition.
    • The Elements of Design Symmetrical vs. Asymmetrical Balance Piet Mondrian, Composition in Red, Yellow, and Blue (1930)Very dark or saturated areas of color demand attention within a composition.An area of high contrast, even at a small size, will automatically draw theviewer s eye. Forms placed near the edge of a page can also draw morevisual attention than forms placed directly in the center of a page.
    • The Elements of Design The Rule of ThirdsThe Rule of Thirds refers to the idea of dividing a composition into thirds basedon a grid. The most important elements of the composition fall on the lines inbetween to create a strong composition.A slightly off center balance is more visually interesting and harmonious than anevenly centered composition.
    • The Elements of Design The Golden MeanGolden Mean: Relationship between sizes that is pleasing to the human eye. This conceptwas first formally recognized by the ancient Greeks, and examples of the golden mean canbe observed through Greek artwork and architecture.This principle is based on the Fibonacci sequence, which is a series if numbers to denoteproportions: 2,3,5,8,13,21,34,55,89,144,233, etc. The each number in this series is the sumof the two numbers proceeding it.
    • The Elements of Design The Golden Mean The Fibonacci Sequence is also one of the most elemental building blocks found in nature. The golden mean appears in everything from atomic structures to galaxies. Graphic designers can use these proportions to create work that instinctively looks right.
    • The Elements of Design The Golden MeanImage Source: http://bit.ly/570o4l The Fibonacci Sequence is also one of the most elemental building blocks found in nature. The golden mean appears in everything from atomic structures to galaxies. Graphic designers can use these proportions to create work that instinctively looks right.
    • The Elements of Design The Golden MeanProportions are based on the number Pi, in which measurements are approximately1.618 times one another in a layout.In the example above, segment A is 1.618 times the size of segment B, and segment B is1.618 times the size of segment C.B and C added together equal the approximate length of segment A.This principle is based on the Fibonacci sequence, which is a series if numbers to denoteproportions: 2,3,5,8,13,21,34,55,89,144,233, etc. The each number in this series is the sumof the two numbers proceeding it.
    • The Elements of Design Design HarmonyDesign Harmony: The overall effect of design that is visually unified and in whichelements flow together to make a successful layout. When all the elements of designwork together in tandem, harmony is achieved.