Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric-  JenniferHein
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Textile Content Introduction, Natural & Manufactured Fabric- JenniferHein

371

Published on

Textile Content Introduction, with some examples to illustrate Natural Cellulose & Protein materials & Manufactured fibers. Creative Commons License

Textile Content Introduction, with some examples to illustrate Natural Cellulose & Protein materials & Manufactured fibers. Creative Commons License

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
371
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
29
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Textile Content Samples
  • 2. Natural Fibers To Study NATURAL FIBERS are found in nature & used in the same form it was found. Four specific examples PLANT materials/ Cellulose: a) cotton b) linen, flax, hemp. ANIMAL Materials/ Protein: c) wool / angora, cashmere, d) silk.
  • 3. Cotton
  • 4. Pima County, AZ Cotton Fields
  • 5. FIBER CLASSIFICATION Two broad classifications for fiber origins are: Natural Manufactured / manmade. Manufactured is natural by- products processed to be useable material EX- Tree bark converted to Rayon
  • 6. Linen Processing Barn
  • 7. Linen, Flax , Hemp BAST FIBER PLANT MATERIALS: LINEN is bast fiber from stalk of FLAX plant. Grown in Eastern Europe, Ireland & New Zealand. JUTE bast fiber from Asia. USE: Burlap, for linoleum and carpet backings, furniture upholstery webbing. HEMP bast fiber- handled like flax, USE: wall coverings & drapery RAMIE: grown mainly in Asia but also in Egypt, France, Italy & Russia. Stiff & strong so usually blended with cotton or rayon.
  • 8. Plant Materials
  • 9. OTHER CELLULOSE FIBERS Abaca : member of Banana family, from Philippines, USE: rope , cord, place mats Agave-Sisal : from 4yr. old evergreen leaves, USE: matting or carpeting Coir: from coconut husks, USE: outdoor carpets, floor mats , patio coverings Kapok: from tree seed hairs, lightweight fiber used for life preservers, orig. USE: pillow & upholstery filling Pina: from pineapple leaves, from Philippines: soft flexible, USE: embroidered table covers/ cloth
  • 10. ANIMAL Materials/ Protein c) Wool : Angora, Cashmere
  • 11. Wool- Protein WOOL / PROTEIN FIBER TRADE NAMES (p.35) Worsted, Woolen, Merino, Shetland, Lambswool, Cashmere, Mohair, Alpaca, Pashmina Dominant Wool Fabric Types: 1) WORSTED - high quality, smooth compact yarn spun from long wool fibers, with smoother finish 2) WOOLEN - fuzzy, loosely twisted yarns from short wool fibers, coarser finish than worsted.
  • 12. Cashmere Wool, Goat hair
  • 13. Wool Rugs Metropolitan Museum , Deco Paris Exhibit
  • 14. ANIMAL Materials or Protein: SILK. PROTEIN MATERIAL: SILK: CULTIVATED SILK, Bombyx Mori silkworms, feed on mulberry leaves, highly resistant to mildew, moths & silverfish but not beetles. OR rough, inexpensive silkWILD SILK/ TUSSAH SILK worms feed on Oak leaves in China & India, rough quality
  • 15. Silk Scalamandre Upholstery
  • 16. Silk Moire Weave Upholstery Fabric Scalamandre
  • 17. Silk Satin / Taffeta
  • 18. NATURAL FIBER Review CELLULOSE PROTEIN A.Cotton A. Silk, B. Linen B. Wool /worsted C. Flax/ Hemp C. woolen/ mohair D. Blend of 2 Cellulose D.Blend of two protein plant fibers fibers
  • 19. Manufactured Fiber Materials are found in nature & used after they are processed. Specific example fibers we are studying are made from. WOOD fibers: a) acetate b)rayon c) triacetate d) Lyocell MINERAL / silica sand / metals a) glass, b)metal c)carbon fibers ELASTOMERIC FIBERS are manufactured from the rubber tree. They are a segmented polyurethane and become Spandex fibers that stretch. Ex. Spandex, Lycra elastics
  • 20. NONWOVEN • Leather / cow-Hide, organic skin material • NON-woven felt , – historically cotton/ wool felt, now polyester (manmade) • Backed Vinyl Manmade Fiber • Hyde/ leatherette , manmade • Rug / Carpet Pad ( foam, acrylic manmades)
  • 21. Wallpapers
  • 22. Manmades 1903 Artificial silk is made in England. In 1910 renamed Rayon. 1st manmade filaments were made from a solution of cellulose, named artificial silk. Mechanical processing was improved and artificial silk was renamed Rayon. Invention of manmade fibers was successfully marketed with petroleum chemistry after WWII/ 1945. 1939-45 During WWII, Nylon was introduced to replace silk stockings. 1960s & 70s Wrinkle Free Polyester was made. It allowed designers to use very bold colors.
  • 23. Nylon NYLON, manufactured fiber, polyamide, made from coal, ( phenol derived from benzene) water & air (carbon, hydrogen , oxygen & nitrogen)… • Trade names: – Antron, Dacron, Astroturf, Celanese
  • 24. Synthetic or Manmade Materials are not found in nature. They are manufactured polymers (plastics) Specific example fibers that are the most commonly used are: a) acrylic b) olefin c) nylon d) polyester e) vinyon f) aramid…. The Most Common Interior Furnishings Fibers Are: Rayon, (synthetic manufactured fiber) Nylon, Polyester, Acrylic, Olefin Elastomeric Spandex. (synthetic manufactured fiber)
  • 25. New Marriot Downtown
  • 26. MANMADES / Inexpensive Fibers • Polyester / Trevira/ Avora poly. 100% • Nylon 100% (Knits & Knoll Crepe) • Olefin - 40% in fabric / 100% Polyolefin • Use: carpet or wallcovering • Acrylic / any other plasticizer • Use : drapery fabrics • Acrylic backing on carpet or rugs
  • 27. Rugs are usually, nylon / olefin
  • 28. MANMADE TIMELINE 1903 CE Artificial silk is made in England. In 1910 renamed Rayon. 1910First manmade filaments were made from a solution of cellulose, called artificial silk. The mechanical processing was improved and artificial silk was renamed Rayon. Invention of manmade fibers was successfully marketed with petroleum chemistry after WWII/ 1945. 1939-45 During WWII, Nylon was introduced to replace silk stockings. 1960s & 70s Wrinkle Free Polyester was made. It allowed designers to use very bold colors.
  • 29. Manufactured & Manmade Review Manufactured fibers from. WOOD fibers: a) acetate b) rayon c) triacetate d) Lyocell MINERAL / silica sand / metals a) glass, b)metal c)carbon fibers manufactured polymers or plastics many call Manmade Fibers include: most commonly used are: a) Acrylic b) Olefin c) Nylon ELASTOMERIC FIBERS are d) manufactured from rubber Expolyurethane, become Spandex fibers e) that stretch. Polyester f) aramid…. Vinyon

×