• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Strategies for Successful Teen Services
 

Strategies for Successful Teen Services

on

  • 1,521 views

Workshop for Southern Ontario Library Service – Spring 2013 ...

Workshop for Southern Ontario Library Service – Spring 2013
Teens can be the most elusive library users and teen services often operate with limited staff and resources, presenting unique challenges and opportunities for libraries. Learn strategies for developing successful teen programs and tackling the biggest obstacle of all … getting teens into the library. Gain a better understanding of teens as library users and examine the role brain development plays in shaping teen behaviour. Explore the range of programming options available from book clubs and writer’s workshops to gaming and teen tech programs. Discover why teen services provides an ideal platform to experiment and pilot new ideas and approaches, using technology to enhance and reinvent traditional programs and services.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,521
Views on SlideShare
1,519
Embed Views
2

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
14
Comments
0

1 Embed 2

http://www.pinterest.com 2

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Strategies for Successful Teen Services Strategies for Successful Teen Services Presentation Transcript

    • Strategies for SuccessfulJennifer GalHamilton Public LibrarySpring 2013Southern OntarioLibrary Service
    • Agenda,````<Teen Services & TeensStrategies & Ideasto Teens & to Staff,````<
    • pinterest.com/libraryjenniferAll of the resources highlighted areavailable at:wwww.slideshare.net/jennifer.galThis presentation is available at:
    • ,``````<ChallengesOpportunitiesPart 1UnderstandingThe Teenage BrainTeen Library UseBarriers to Engagement```
    • Teen Services
    • ````````````ChallengesPhoto courtesy of National Media Museum on Flickr.
    • ````````````Flying SoloPhoto courtesy of State Library of Queensland, Australia on Flickr.Working in teenservices cansometimes beisolating.This area of libraryservices doesn’ttraditionally have thesame level of staffingthat is dedicated tochildren’s or adultservices.
    • ````````````Staffing LimitationsAccording to the OPLA’s TeenServices Benchmarks andStatistical Report 2013, ofnearly 150 Ontario publiclibraries surveyed,only 1% of full-timeequivalent staff are allocatedexclusively to teen services .“Teen Services Benchmarks and Statistical Report 2013.”Ontario Public Library Association , February 2013
    • ````````````Staffing Limitations69% of libraries have aperson in charge of children’sservices.31%of libraries havestaff allocated exclusively toteen services.“Teen Services Benchmarks and Statistical Report 2013.”Ontario Public Library Association , February 2013
    • ````````````Budget LimitationsChildren’s vs. Teen Programming Budgets“Teen Services Benchmarks and Statistical Report 2013.”Ontario Public Library Association , February 2013$581,6732009$101,9882012*total of all Ontario public libraries surveyed
    • ````````````Budget Limitations“... Teen librarians are challenged toappeal to one of the most visuallysophisticated audiences with some ofthe highest competition out there.It is hard to meet the technology needs,the collection needs, and theprogramming desires of this age groupwithout reasonable funding ...”“Missing the Mark: how young adult (teen) services in libraries are designed to fail.”Teen Librarian Toolbox, September 6, 2012
    • ````````````Budget Limitations“... Crafts fromrecycled toiletpaper rolls workgreat with toddlers,less so withteenagers.”“Missing the Mark: how young adult (teen) services in libraries are designed to fail.”Teen Librarian Toolbox, September 6, 2012
    • ````````````Constant Audience TurnoverPhoto courtesy of Dan4th on Flickr.
    • ````````````Constant Audience Turnover• Teen library staff are faced with the task ofconstantly generating new audiences.• A teen audience is a perpetually movingtarget – as current teens outgrowprograms, a new crop of teens need to bereached.
    • ````````````Constant Audience Turnover• Staff don’t have the advantage of growinga teen audience over time.• Even a successful program can suddenlyunravel if the core group of teensgraduates.• Teen staff need to consider audience‘succession planning’.
    • ````````````Serious Competition• “In 2011 … the 13- to 19-year-old cohort ofAmerican teens possessed approximately$200 billion of buying power, making them asignificant market for advertisers andcorporations.”“Advertising, Marketing, and Consumerism and Children / Youth Online.”Media Smarts: Canada’s Centre for Digital and Media Literacy
    • ````````````OpportunitiesPhoto courtesy of Vancouver Public Library on Flickr.
    • ````````````Always in BetaThe factors that make teen services challengingalso provide fertile ground for creativity andinnovation.• Teen services don’t share the long history ofchildren’s services but also don’t usually haveto contend with ‘we’ve always done it this way’attitudes.• Limited staffing and budgets promotecreative solutions.
    • ````````````Risky BehaviourFlying under the radarprovides an opportunity toexperiment and take riskson new ideas.A low profile also makes iteasier to make and recoverfrom mistakes.
    • ````````````Significant Progress100% of Ontariolibraries surveyed nowhave a separatelydefined budget for teenmaterials.This compares to only20%in 2003.Photo courtesy of Enokson on Flickr.“Teen Services Benchmarks and Statistical Report 2013.”Ontario Public Library Association , February 2013
    • ````````````Significant Progress74% of libraries have alounge area for teens.This compares to only29%in 2003.68% of libraries offerprograms for teens.Photo courtesy of Vancouver Public Library on Flickr.“Teen Services Benchmarks and Statistical Report 2013.”Ontario Public Library Association , February 2013``
    • ````````````YA Publishing Boom• “With more than 4,000 titles and $600 millionin sales during 2011, youth literature is thefastest-growing category in publishing.”• This renaissance in teen publishing is attractingan audience broader than the traditional 12 to18 age range, with “55% of those who purchaseYoung Adult fiction … between their late 20s andmid 40s.”“Teen Fiction a Turn-on for Adults, Too: Boom Times for Young Adult Fiction.”Lorraine Chan, UBC Reports, December 5, 2012
    • ````````````YA Publishing BoomTeen literature hasalso taken over thebox office and thesmall screen with asteady stream offilm and TVadaptationsoriginating fromyoung adult fiction.
    • ````````````YA Publishing BoomYoung adult novels “are incredibly filmic. They’reso lean and propulsive and have suchmomentum. They are novels with characters,scenes and action that read like screenplays.”Judith Saltman, Professor at the School of Library, Archivaland Information Studies at University of British Columbia“Teen Fiction a Turn-on for Adults, Too: Boom Times for Young Adult Fiction.”Lorraine Chan, UBC Reports, December 5, 2012
    • Teens
    • ````````````Know Your AudiencePhoto courtesy of The National Archives UK on Flickr.
    • ````````````The Teenage Brain“Adolescents differ fromadults in the way theybehave, solve problems,and make decisions. Thereis a biological explanationfor this difference.”“The Teen Brain: Behavior, Problem Solving, and Decision Making.”The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, December 2011
    • ````````````The Teenage BrainAmygdala: the region of the brain responsiblefor instinctual reactions including fear andaggressive behaviour.Frontal Cortex: the area of the brain thatcontrols reasoning and helps us think before weact.Teen behaviour is guided more by the amygdala,which develops earlier than the frontal cortex.“The Teen Brain: Behavior, Problem Solving, and Decision Making.”The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, December 2011
    • ````````````The Teenage BrainBased on the stage of theirbrain development, adolescents aremore likely to:• act on impulse• misread or misinterpret social cues and emotions• get into accidents of all kinds• get involved in fights• engage in dangerous or risky behaviour“The Teen Brain: Behavior, Problem Solving, and Decision Making.”The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, December 2011
    • ````````````The Teenage BrainAdolescents are less likely to:• think before they act• pause to consider the potentialconsequences of their actions• modify their dangerous or inappropriatebehaviours“The Teen Brain: Behavior, Problem Solving, and Decision Making.”The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, December 2011
    • ````````````Teen Library UseAccording to Pew Internet’s Younger Americans’Reading and Library Habits Report , high schoolstudents are “more likely than other age groups to have“Younger Americans’ Reading and Library Habits.”Pew Internet and American Life Project , October 23, 2012used the library inthe past year.”They are also “morelikely than others toget readingrecommendationsat the library.”
    • ````````````Teen Library Use“Younger Americans’ Reading and Library Habits.”Pew Internet and American Life Project , October 23, 201272% of teensaged 16-17 haveused the library inthe last yearcompared to49% of adultsaged 65 and older
    • ````````````Teen Library Use“Yet while high schoolers led all other age groupsin library use, their appreciation for these libraryservices does not follow suit ...45% of high schoolers ...say that the library is not important or‘not too important’ to them and their family.”“Younger Americans’ Reading and Library Habits.”Pew Internet and American Life Project , October 23, 2012
    • ````````````Barriers to Engagement• There are many factors that preventcustomers from attending a program ortaking advantage of a library service,teens especially.• Teens are a notoriously difficult audience toreach, so it’s important to understand thebarriers that may limit their participation inlibrary programs.
    • ````````````Teen Perceptions of Libraries
    • ````````````Teen Perceptions of LibrariesThe Halifax Public Library Teen Services Reportcites numerous factors that may prevent teenparticipation in library programs:• “Youth may have encountered unfriendly staff orun-welcoming library environments• Youth may associate libraries with strict rules,enforced silence, homework, and as being only forstrong readers• Library culture can be full of jargon and procedures”“Halifax Public Library Teen Services Report 2005/06.”Halifax Public Library, 2005
    • ````````````Fines• Many teens believe that they are prohibitedfrom using the library or attending programsdue to fines on their account.• “Fines and fees (often years old) block librarycards and prevent access, and libraries oftenpresent an unforgiving front.”“Halifax Public Library Teen Services Report 2005/06.”Halifax Public Library, 2005
    • ````````````FinesThe Community-LedLibraries Toolkitdescribes a teen who was“afraid to come in to thelibrary because he was surethe security gates wouldalert staff to his fines. Theteen believed that librarystaff would take hisskateboard in lieu of themoney he did not have topay those fines.”“Community-Led Libraries Toolkit.”Libraries in Communities, March 2008
    • ````````````Timing• Teens are often overscheduled with school,extracurricular activities, work, familyobligations, etc.• With so many priorities to juggle, finding thetime to attend a library program can bechallenging.
    • ````````````Awareness“Once an ignored demographic for advertisers,todays young people have become the mostmarketed-to generation in history, thanks totheir spending power and their future clout asadult consumers.”“Marketing and Consumerism - Overview.”Media Smarts: Canada’s Centre for Digital and Media Literacy
    • ````````````AwarenessBecause teens are constantly bombarded withcarefully targeted advertising, it can bedifficult for libraries need to break through thisnoise to make them aware of and interested inwhat the library has to offer.
    • ```,``````<ConsistencyOwnershipCreating IncentivesProgrammingCore OfferingsUnstructured ProgramsPassive ProgramsTech ProgrammingResourcesPart 2
    • strategies
    • ````````````Getting Teens in the DoorPhoto courtesy of coolinsights on Flickr.One of the biggestobstacles in teenservices is simplygetting teens intothe library.The adage ‘if youoffer it, they willcome’, does notapply to teenprograms.
    • ````````````Consistency• Follow the same model that has beensuccessful with children’s services by offeringconsistent program times and days.• Even if the program itself changes, devote aregular block of time to teen programming.• One-off programs require you to generate anaudience each time.
    • ````````````Remove Barriers• Fewer hoops tojump throughincreases thelikelihood that teenswill attend.• Make it easytoremember, registerand participate.
    • ````````````OwnershipAccording to IFLA’s Guidelines for LibraryServices for Young Adults• “Libraries who wish to offer effective andmeaningful programs for young adults mustseek out their participation at all stages ofthe program process.• Young adults should be recognized as theexperts on what will be appealing and usefulto them”“Guidelines for Library Services for Young Adults.”International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions , 1996
    • ````````````Ownership• Providing teens with a voice in the processgives them ownership over programs andservices, and a personal investment in makingthem successful.• “Involving young adults in decision making,planning, and implementing programs forthemselves is highly recommended as a bestpractice that contributes to positive youthdevelopment.”“Guidelines for Library Services for Young Adults.”International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions , 1996
    • ````````````Teen Advisory GroupsPhoto courtesy of Vancouver Public Library on Flickr.
    • ````````````Teen Advisory Groups• Teen advisory groups provide a forum forteens to share their ideas and help shapelibrary programming.• They can serve as a standing focus group forstaff to vet and explore new programs andservices.• Teen advisory groups are most successfulwhen they have the opportunity to implementtheir suggestions and see tangible outcomes.
    • ````````````Create Incentives• Not to be confused withbribery, it’s importantthat programs aredesigned with clearincentives for theparticipants.• Teens, like everyone else,want to know what’s init for them.
    • ````````````Create IncentivesIncentives might provide teens the opportunity to:• Earn volunteer hours• Develop their resume• Socialize• Learn a skill• Meet new people• Make a difference… Eat
    • Ideas
    • ````````````Core OfferingsPhoto courtesy of Vancouver Public Library on Flickr.
    • ````````````Book Clubs• With the YA publishing boom in full swing,book clubs have more material to discuss thanever before – and potentially more recruits.• Finding enough available copies of a singletitle each month can be difficult withoutpurchasing separate book club copies.Genre-based clubs present an affordablealternative by encouraging teens discuss titlesin a particular genre rather than reading thesame book.
    • ````````````Book ClubsPhoto of Skype visit with Sara Zarr courtesy of The Unquiet Library on Flickr.
    • ````````````Book Clubs• Thanks to Skype and Facetime, club membersnow have more opportunities to meet andinteract with authors.• Remote book clubs can also be establishedthrough the library website, Facebook page, orTwitter feed.
    • ````````````Writing and Poetry ProgramsDIY MagneticPoetry Kits“National Poetry Month Craftswith Teen Librarian’s Toolbox.”The Library as Incubator Project, April 12, 2013
    • ````````````Writing and Poetry Programs“National Poetry Month Craftswith Teen Librarian’s Toolbox.”The Library as Incubator Project, April 12, 2013Blackout Poetry
    • ````````````Writing and Poetry Programs“National Poetry Month Craftswith Teen Librarian’s Toolbox.”The Library as Incubator Project, April 12, 2013Book Spine Poetry
    • ````````````Writing and Poetry Programs“Spine Poetry with Books.” Greater Victoria Public Library
    • ````````````Craft ProgramsPhoto courtesy of Mosman Library on Flickr.• Though crafts are a staple ofteen programming they canbe pricey, labour intensive,and are not always genderneutral.• But ... these programs aretraditionally successful interms of generating anaudience and provide teenswith an opportunity to learn,be social, and makesomething tangible.
    • ````````````Altered Books“Recycled Reads at the Austin Public Library.”The Library as Incubator Project, January 8, 2013
    • ````````````Altered BooksBook Crafts board on PinterestFargo Public Library
    • ````````````Instagram Art“National Craft Month: Instagram Crafts.”The Library as Incubator Project, March 22, 2013
    • ````````````Instagram Art“Turn your Instagram pics into Photobooth bookmarks.”Teen Librarian Toolbox, December 17, 2012bookmarks, mini scrapbooks
    • ````````````Knitting• Knitting programs areless staff intensive interms of planning andpreparation and are agood option forlibraries looking to offera regular craft program.• Teens can also beencouraged to knit forcharity - i.e. hospitals,shelters, out of the coldprograms etc.Photo courtesy of Twilight Taggers on Flickr.
    • ````````````Unstructured ProgramsPhoto courtesy of Monterey Public Library on Flickr.
    • ````````````Unstructured ProgramsNot every program needs to be carefully plannedand orchestrated. In unstructured programs, “teensare invited into the library in a designated space... and given the opportunity to experience thelibrary and each other, but choose how they aregoing to spend their time within that environment.”Examples:• Coffeehouses• Gaming programs• Study halls“Dont Underestimate the Value of ‘Hanging Out’.”Teen Librarian Toolbox, September 7, 2011
    • ````````````The Value of Hanging OutPhoto courtesy of Vancouver Public Library on Flickr.
    • ````````````The Value of Hanging OutUnstructured programs giveteens the chance to:• “explore relationships• navigate social situations in asafe environment• choose for themselves howthey want to spend their time• feel a greater sense offreedom in a safe space”Photo courtesy of Enokson on Flickr.“Dont Underestimate the Value of ‘Hanging Out’.”Teen Librarian Toolbox, September 7, 2011
    • ````````````Passive Programs“Passive programming engages teens in thelibrary without requiring much from staff interms of supervision ...It’s non-threatening, as well as flexible forimplementation and participation ...”Examples:• Trivia, puzzles, word searches• Scavenger hunts• Contests• Interactive displays“Reaching Teens Subversively through Passive Programming.”Kelly Jensen, Programming Librarian, April 2013
    • ````````````Passive Programs“Teens may find it tough to commit to traditionalprograms, or may not remember when to showup for an event. Passive activities, however,encourage library use on teen schedules —not yours.”Passive programs also appeal to introvertedteens who may not feel comfortableparticipating in traditional library programming“Reaching Teens Subversively through Passive Programming.”Kelly Jensen, Programming Librarian, April 2013
    • ````````````Scavenger Hunts“Steampunk Challenge - Online Scavenger Hunt .” Greater Victoria Public Library
    • ````````````Alternate Reality Games“ARGs (Alternate RealityGames) are interactivenarratives that take place in thereal world, not just online. Theyuse multiple media to tell asingle, overarching story.”Toronto Public Library’s KeepToronto Reading campaign isusing an ARG themed aroundRay Bradburys “Fahrenheit 451”.“Toronto Public Library Enters Alternate Reality (Gaming).”Meredith Schwartz, Library Journal, April 11, 2013
    • ````````````Alternate Reality Games“To join the game, Torontonians must call aphone number and speak to a character fromthe book who assigns them the missions.”“Toronto Public Library Enters Alternate Reality (Gaming).”Meredith Schwartz, Library Journal, April 11, 2013
    • ````````````Alternate Reality GamesTo complete the missions,players need to:• Record a message reciting apassage from a library book• Search for clues in Bradburymemorabilia from TPL’s specialcollections• Post a photo of themselvesonline with a favourite book“Toronto Public Library Enters Alternate Reality (Gaming).”Meredith Schwartz, Library Journal, April 11, 2013
    • ````````````Interactive Displays“Library Book Face.” Carroll County Public Library
    • ````````````Interactive Displays“Library Sleevefacing.” BGSU University Libraries
    • ````````````Tech ProgrammingPhoto courtesy of Enokson on Flickr.
    • ````````````Tech Programming• According to Nichole Pinkard, founder of theDigital Youth Network:“Literate in 2020 will mean being multi-literate:the ability to critically consume and producemedia such as print, video, sound and screen.”• Libraries have an important role to play inpromoting this expanded definition of literacy.“Rethinking Our Definitions of Literacy.”Nichole Pinkard, PBS Parents, February 2011
    • ````````````Tech Programming• There have never been so many optionsavailable for integrating technology into teenprogramming.• Tech programs provide teens with theopportunity strengthen their digital literacyskills while offering an important creative andsocial outlet.
    • ````````````Tech ProgrammingPrograms can bedesigned to teachnew skills or enableteens to show offthe skills theyalready have.Photo courtesy of Nicola since 1972 on Flickr.
    • ````````````Teen Tech Squad• Many libraries are offering teens theopportunity to share their tech savvy byhelping other library customers through TeenTech Squad or Tech Tutors programs.• It’s a great way for teens to earn volunteerhours and develop their resume.• It also provides teens the opportunity to bethe expert and helps promote betterintergenerational understanding in the library.
    • ````````````Teen Tech Squad“Teen Tech Squad OverDrive Tutorial for iPad.” Lafayette Public Library
    • ````````````Video Contests“Teen Tech Week Video Contest.” Ottawa Public Library
    • ````````````Stop Motion AnimationSmoovie for iPad
    • ````````````Photo Editingwww.pixlr.com
    • ````````````eBook MakingBook Creator for iPad
    • ````````````Resourceswww.teenlibrariantoolbox.com
    • ````````````Resourceswww.libraryasincubatorproject.org
    • ````````````Resourcespinterest.com
    • ```,``````<Aspirational MarketingWhere The Teens AreThere’s an App for ThatCrowdsourcingMarketingOvercoming ResistanceEducating StaffMaking the CasePart 3
    • to Teens
    • ````````````Aspirational Marketing“A key trend driving thespending habits of tweens inthe U.S. is the ‘agecompression’ phenomenon,also known as KGOY (kidsgetting older, younger). Thistrend has seen tweensrejecting traditional toys infavor of more grown upproducts, previously targetedat teenagers.”“Tweens R Shoppers.”POPAI: The Global Association for Marketing at Retail, March 7, 2013
    • ````````````Aspirational Marketing• While age compression is one of themarketing industry’s less savory tactics (thinklip gloss ads for toddlers), to remaincompetitive, libraries still need to think interms of aspirational marketing.• All teens and tweens aspire to be older,cooler and more sophisticated – and librarypublicity should reflect this.
    • ````````````Where the Teens Are• Traditional avenues for library marketing(newsletters, newspaper ads, etc.), are lesseffective when promoting to teens.• Target you’re marketing efforts to areas whereteens are most accessible: on social media,mobile marketing via texting, in schools,community centres etc.“Library Marketing.”Youth Services Librarianship Wiki
    • ````````````Create an Appwww.infinitemonkeys.mobi
    • ````````````Send Textswww.remind101.com
    • ````````````There’s An App for That• There are a variety ofwebsites and apps thatcan be useful forcreating teen publicity.• With the range of toolsavailable, you can createcustom graphics inminutes.“Generate Marketing Creativity with iPhone Apps.”Teen Librarian Toolbox, July 19, 2011
    • ````````````www.pixlr.comThere’s An App for That
    • ````````````There’s An App for ThatPhoster for iPad
    • ````````````There’s An App for ThatWordFotofor iPad
    • ````````````There’s An App for ThatPercolatorfor iPad
    • ````````````There’s An App for ThatComicBook!for iPad
    • ````````````Crowd SourcingPhoto courtesy of mrsdkrebson Flickr.
    • ````````````Crowd SourcingIncrease your onlinepresence by encouragingteens to create content foryou through photo contestsand social media campaigns.• ‘Get Caught Reading’• Fake photo contests (i.e. CookieMonster reading in the stacks)• ‘Book Facing’ campaigns• Book Spine PoetryPhoto courtesy of Carmichael Library Flickr.
    • ````````````Crowd SourcingTeen Library Card Design ContestHuntsville Madison County Public Library• Recruit teens to do themarketing for you.• Contests to designpromotional materials suchas posters or library cardsserve two purposes bygenerating teen producedpublicity as well as word ofmouth marketing.
    • to Staff
    • ````````````Overcoming Resistance“If you have spent any time working with teens,you know that one of the greatest challengesis getting your fellow staff on board.Teens tends to be some of the mostmisunderstood and maligned members of ourcommunity. Some staff members fear teens,others just dont understand why they do thethings that they do.”“Missing the Mark: how young adult (teen) services in libraries are designed to fail.”Teen Librarian Toolbox, September 6, 2012
    • ````````````Educating StaffThe Teen Librarian Toolbox outlines some keys toeducating other library staff about teen services.• Informative• Proactive• Inspiring• Honest• Consistent• Fun“The "Be"-Attitudes of Communicating with Staff.”Teen Librarian Toolbox, July 21, 2011Be
    • ````````````Making the Case• Develop a clear Teen Services Plan that details“why you do what you do”.• A fully developed plan can be used as atraining document for other library staff andas a tool to justify teen services to libraryadministration.• An excellent example of a Teen Services Planis available on the Teen Librarian Toolbox.“Marketing Teen Services to Non Teen Services Staff, A Teen Services Plan Example.”Teen Librarian Toolbox, July 21, 2011
    • pinterest.com/libraryjenniferAll of the resources highlighted areavailable at:wwww.slideshare.net/jennifer.galThis presentation is available at: