Supercharging Your Social Media Practice:
A Play in Three Acts
Jenna Ben-Yehuda, Wittenberg Weiner Consulting, LLC
Kenneth...
Jenna @WWC
Wittenberg Weiner Consulting (WWC) is an 8(a), small,
woman-owned consulting firm focused on the management
and...
Ken @Thismoment
Kenneth Grosso
Thismoment
ken@thismoment.com
@kennethgrosso
kennethgrosso
Standing out from the social her...
Agenda
Supercharging Your Social Media Practice:
A Play in Three Acts
<< 1:00 PM – 3:30 PM >>
1:00 PM – 1:40 PM Introducti...
Act I: Setting Up Shop
What is available to you?
• A lot!
• Here is what EPA has
approved
• The options are numerous
and v...
4 Key Questions
But before you open up shop, you need to
ask yourself these four questions:
a.What is my office trying to ...
How the USDA addresses this:
Key Requirements:
Mission
Goals
Why does this technology meet those goals
Understanding y...
What is my office trying to accomplish
through social media?
Are you trying simply to share the content from your Web site...
What is the irreducible element and why
does it matter?
TEXT
Social Networks
Examples: Facebook, GovLoop, Google+, Linked ...
Irreducible Element: Image/Microvideo
IMAGE/MICROVIDEO
Examples: Instagram, Vine, Pinterest
Irreducible element: Image
Gre...
Irreducible Element: Video
VIDEO
Example: YouTube
Irreducible element: A/V
Great for: adding high-touch element to social ...
Irreducible Element: Ideation, Surveys,
Slides…but So What?
WHAT ELSE IS THERE?
Ideation / Survey: IdeaScale, Survey Monke...
Questions?
Act II: Stocking the Shelves
>>Recap: Act I > Mission > Know Your Audience > Choose Your Channels
Key Question Becomes:
Ac...
A Closer Look: The State Department
Act II: Stocking the ShelvesAct II: Stocking the Shelves
By The Numbers (Feb 2012 npr....
3 Mortal Enemies of Old Fashioned
Content Creation/Management
Act II: Stocking the ShelvesAct II: Stocking the Shelves
 L...
CMS Example: Thismoment
Act II: Stocking the ShelvesAct II: Stocking the Shelves
3 Key Elements to Look for in a CMS
Act II: Stocking the ShelvesAct II: Stocking the Shelves
a. Supports Goals
Where are y...
Brand challenges are changing
UNIVERSAL ALWAYS ON DIFFERENTIATED
Teams are struggling to meet them
POINT
SOLUTIONS
MANUAL
WORKFLOW
CUSTOM
R&D
POOR
GOVERANCE
More Stakeholders, More Requirements
CREATIVE
power • flexibility
MANAGERS
visibility • collaboration
BUSINESS UNITS
acces...
Manage/Creat
e
•Brand
•Curated
•User Generated Content
(UGC)
•Engagement modules
•Responsive templates or
custom design
Ho...
Powered by Thismoment
Multimedia Theater
Social
sharing and conversation
Content
brand and user-generated
Next steps
downl...
Live Thismoment DECs
Visit: HERE
User Name: tm
Password: dynamicbrandexperience
So now what?
Act II: Stocking the ShelvesAct II: Stocking the Shelves
Now that you know what you have, you need to know wh...
Questions?
Act III: Analyzing Sales to Spur Growth
Act III: Analyzing Sales to Spur GrowthAct III: Analyzing Sales to Spur Growth
Soc...
Thismoment Reporting Capabilities
Gain Clear & Detailed Visibility into the State of Your Overall Social
Campaigns as well...
Questions?
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Supercharging Your Social Media Practice: A Play in Three Acts

177
-1

Published on

Social Media for Government and Nonprofit Communications

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
177
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Jenna Ben-Yehuda is a seasoned national security professional with 12 years of experience at the State Department, where she completed her service in February 2013 as the Senior Military Advisor to the Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs. Jenna has served in a variety of policy, intelligence, communications, Congressional, and programmatic roles and has regional expertise in Latin America and the Caribbean and North Africa. Jenna developed programming for Secretary of State Clinton and accompanied her on foreign travel and led intelligence briefings for and traveled with Secretary Powell. She has written for President Obama and four Secretaries of State (Albright-Clinton) and represented the State Department in numerous interagency settings, including at the National Security Staff.
  • Each Act 3 questions for your social media shop/3 phases We’ll be asking other questions within it. What are you going to offer? How are you going to run it? What is your plan for growth? Timeframe Each Act: 40 min presentation, 5 for questions, 5 min break Total: 2.5 hours (150 minutes)
  • Image Credit: http://img.sfw.cn/admin/w/news/uploadfile/20120606150802506.jpg http://www.govloop.com/profiles/blogs/epa-social-media-terms-of-service
  • We’ll take these one at a time. This is how I think of it. As a point of reference, when you are setting up a new feed within USDA, their form AD-3022, if framed slightly differently.     The USDA has a form ( AD-3022 ) that requires offices to answer these questions when they want to start a new feed, asking:   1. Mission – Why do you want to establish a new media account/channel? 2. Goals - What do you want to accomplish? 3. Why is this the best technology or tool for the above stated goals? 4. Intended audience 5. Content and information to be shared, events covered, etc 6. Evaluation and success factors
  • What is the asset to resource match: camera to picture, writers to text, videographers/editors to video (which is why microvideo is different than video) So after you figure out how your office will benefit from participating in social media, and you determine which social media you’re going to use, you need to ask: who is going to maintain the feeds? What assets—in terms of images, videos, status updates, and blog posts—will you need to generate and then monitor? That will be the next act.   Let’s review: Classes of social media. Is anyone using any of these already?   Questions?
  • Now that you’ve decided to go on twitter, or etc etc, now the question becomes: what is the most effective and efficient way to create content and share it across all of your social media channels? In other words: What goes where and how often???
  • That’s a lot of content to keep track of! And how did State keep track of all that content? It didn’t. No one minded the entire store, so it is a near-certainty that some content that would have been helpful in one embassy, but created by another, never made it. And other content was duplicated. And because of turn-over within embassies and offices, content is likely to have gotten lost in personnel transitions. RE FOLLOWING: Until you have an official policy, only follow official, verified, USG accounts. Reason is that you can write following does not mean endorsement, but it is too easy to be misperceived as such.   But even in an agency with less turnover, you need to have contingency planning for your digital assets that is more than, I think it’s on Sally’s harddrive. Create it once, deploy it many times.
  • That’s a lot of content to keep track of! And how did State keep track of all that content? It didn’t. No one minded the entire store, so it is a near-certainty that some content that would have been helpful in one embassy, but created by another, never made it. And other content was duplicated. And because of turn-over within embassies and offices, content is likely to have gotten lost in personnel transitions.   But even in an agency with less turnover, you need to have contingency planning for your digital assets that is more than, I think it’s on Sally’s harddrive. Create it once, deploy it many times.   This is what I call the pantry problem. How many of your have 10 cans of chick peas, but forget to buy milk…just me? Okay, you get the point… the more diverse your offices, the more value you will derive from a content/asset management system that centralizes all of that video, audio, images, documents, etc in a way that will allow people to draw upon the best of what you’ve produced time and again.
  • Work with Ken on this portion: -Why these elements are important and how Thismoment addresses these issues -Important to say Thismoment is just one example of a tool like this, other places might handle this differently, this is one example in action. (The more they understand the tool, they more they are going to appreciate Thismoment, let them come to the determination that you’re the best) -Must continue to hit the SO WHAT, WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT
  • Permissions: Ensuring that the right people have access to this content also helps control the quality of your content so that when people are pressured to produce something that are more likely to produce content of higher value, because it’s within arm’s reach… if everyone uses a single content management system, in addition to field offices knowing what’s coming out of HQ, HQ knows what is coming out of fields offices. This makes better coordination inevitable and we could all use that. Resources: There’s also a resource angle to a shared/single CMS…efficiencies to be gained through utilization of a single CMS. Maybe if enough video content is shared by HQ, all field offices, don’t know video equipment, etc.
  • As brands follow their audience to those channels, new challenges have emerged. Brands must be everywhere--on an ever-expanding and diverse set of social channels, a multitude of devices, and in connected countries around the world. They must be always on--they must constantly refresh their presence, be real-time responsive to events in the marketplace, and actively engaged in a constant dialogue with audiences that don’t sleep. And they must be differentiated--their brand message is broadcast to a swiftly-moving stream packed with thousands of other brand and personal voices. Brands must separate--they must be dynamic--to be seen and heard.
  • As brand teams have struggled to respond these challenges, pain points have developed in their organizations. Point solutions have started to crop up, fragmenting marketing assets, brand identity, brand conversation, and insight. Manual workflow to support point solutions and new business processes has created inefficiency. Brands are spending more and more money and effort on custom R&amp;D to achieve the differentiation they require to be successful. And then incurring maintenance costs post-launch. Finally, these processes and portfolios of applications have made effective governance extremely difficult if not impossible.
  • At each stage of adoption, new requirements surfaced. As an organization’s investment in new strategies and channels expands, more stakeholders with various objectives enter the conversation... Creative wants power and flexibility The business wants efficiency and measurable returns Managers want visibility and cohesive, coordinated workgroups Business units want access to core brand assets, but the ability to target initiatives to specific geos and sub-brands Meanwhile, Legal wants auditable processes and IT wants greater control.
  • The first thing that DEC allows you to do is to create . Create the experience that you want. Using your brand content, or incorporating UGC, we provide a bunch of engagement modules right out of the box, as well as the ability to use responsive templates or to create a totally custom design. After you’ve created the experience, DEC distributes it. It can put it on all of these different platforms, it can put it on all of these different devices, create specific versions for individual regions and also allow you to schedule the phases and (sort of) timing for all of these experiences and content that you want people to be able to access. And by the way, there are other distribution points beyond the ones I’ve mentioned. DEC has been used to power rich media ad units and digital outdoor and I’m sure we’re going to see even more distribution points in the coming year. After you’ve distributed the experience, now it’s time to engage . So things like posting and monitoring, responding to what users are saying, the ability to manage any contests that you’re running, and to have moderation, so that all the submissions are handled in the appropriate manner, and the ability to create a workflow, a situation, so that if you need to have things run through approvals, that those are all supported right within the system. And the of course, you have to be able to measure. Measure all the things that are happening; the traffic, the sentiment, clicks, all of these different elements. And the key here isn’t just these different pieces of the puzzle; it’s the fact that they all work together. So when, for example, I’m measuring the activity of my DEC, then I can look at that activity in aggregate or I can look at it by each individual distribution point. All of these things work together, so that I can really get a picture of what’s going on. And then the last critical piece is scale . I need to be able to take what I’m doing and scale it, with predictable pricing and features and timelines. But also to scale the delivery, so that when I get hundreds of thousands of people, hopefully, to show up, that it actually works. And that kind of scale is what our solution offers and it’s really designed to be worry-free. We’ll take care of the monitoring and the support so you can just concentrate on creating the best experiences possible.
  • But the other thing you have to keep in mind is the experience has to also really incorporate the brand. And as you see here with the example, which I’ll talk about of Coke TV, these elements have been brought together in a way that when I interact I am having an experience. But that experience really is the brand. And this is what we are talking about; a brand delivering to consumers something which is fantastic, but which also is permeated by the brand. But we’re not just talking about brand experience. We’re talking about making a dynamic brand experience. What do we mean by that? ------------------------ Here is an example how the dynamic brand experience looks for Coca-Cola. This is a rich and engaging brand experience with high impact content, social sharing and conversation and next steps all built in.
  • Now I’d like to show you a few DECs in action. Show live DECs (front end).
  • End this section with something like:   So now that you know what you have, you need to know how your audience is responding to it, so you can both give them more of what they want, and develop more engaging content based on your audiences’ demonstrated behavior.   These are the core attributes you should look for: Does it mean the terms of service requirements outlined by GSA? … … (can’t say that This Moment is the only option, but one example of this is This Moment and here’s what is looks like for them…paint the picture..if there’s another one out there, fine, they can go and find it… Ken discusses asset handling part of it. No discussion of metrics here. Content cloud. Permissions. (Just discuss content generation and content dissemination)   End second act by recapping: First act: What do you want your audience to do? And what does your audience want from you? 2 nd act: Now that you know that, how do you create the content and how do you disseminate efficiently and effectively across the various channels? Next step: is critical! It will close the loop between putting out your content and going into your next iteration…(why should you keep doing it? Your big bang is over, what do you do next? If you’re going to start adapting your social media feeds to what your audience is responding to, you have to know what your audienceis responding to: what are they retweeting? What are they repining? Is there surprising behavior? Change your behavior to reinforce good trends—were your initial assumptions correct? Is your audience as active on the social media channels you anticipated? If so, what kind of content did they respond most strongly to?   The way to answer these questions? SOCIAL MEDIA METRICS. Act 3.
  • Act Three: Analyzing Sales to Spur Growth   This is why it is so important to know what you want from you audience—so you know what to measure.   You have to let mission determine your metrics. Do not let metrics determine your mission.   Important metric is engagement, not how many people are following you.   And now you talk about monitoring and how the results of that monitoring should drive their further social media activities.
  • Supercharging Your Social Media Practice: A Play in Three Acts

    1. 1. Supercharging Your Social Media Practice: A Play in Three Acts Jenna Ben-Yehuda, Wittenberg Weiner Consulting, LLC Kenneth Grosso, Thismoment, Inc. Social Media for Government and Nonprofit Communications September 16, 2013
    2. 2. Jenna @WWC Wittenberg Weiner Consulting (WWC) is an 8(a), small, woman-owned consulting firm focused on the management and operational needs of public sector clients. Jenna Ben-Yehuda is a seasoned national security professional with 12 years of experience at the State Department. Jenna developed programming for Secretary of State Clinton and accompanied her on foreign travel and led intelligence briefings for and traveled with Secretary Powell. She has written for President Obama and four Secretaries of State (Albright-Clinton) and represented the State Department in numerous interagency settings, including at the National Security Staff, and developed Secretary Clinton’s first digital Town Hall. Jenna Ben-Yehuda, Director of Federal Practice Wittenberg Weiner Consulting, LLC jenna@ww-consult.com jennabenyehuda
    3. 3. Ken @Thismoment Kenneth Grosso Thismoment ken@thismoment.com @kennethgrosso kennethgrosso Standing out from the social herd is hard. Thismoment makes it easy with our brand marketing system. Studio-quality production. Enterprise-class technology. Thismoment gives you the freedom to create high impact digital experiences and the flexibility to deliver them directly to YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, brand sites, mobile devices and more—securely, at scale and in more than 60 language. Kenneth Grosso has spent the last 20 years immersed in Entrepreneurship primarily in the areas of digital media and technology. He has sold three of his companies and currently manages sales for a digital content distribution software company named Thismoment. Ken works with 18 of the top 20 global brands and many of the leading agencies by providing them a technology to easily manage their infinite amounts of content (videos, photos and conversations) and build socially engaging experiences with the ability to distribute across multiple earned (social) websites, mobile devices, digital out of home as well as their owned websites.
    4. 4. Agenda Supercharging Your Social Media Practice: A Play in Three Acts << 1:00 PM – 3:30 PM >> 1:00 PM – 1:40 PM Introductions and Act I: Setting Up Shop (40 minutes) 1:40 PM – 1:45 PM Questions 1:45 PM – 1:50 PM Break 1:50 PM – 2:30 PM Act I recap and Act II: Stocking the Shelves (40 minutes) 2:30 PM – 2:35 PM Questions 2:35 PM – 2:40 PM Break 2:40 PM – 3:20 PM Act II recap and Act III: Analyzing Sales to Spur Growth (40 minutes) 3:20 PM – 3:30 PM Questions and Close
    5. 5. Act I: Setting Up Shop What is available to you? • A lot! • Here is what EPA has approved • The options are numerous and varied and growing daily, especially when you consider international players Image Credit: http://img.sfw.cn/admin/w/news/uploadfile/201206061508 02506.jpg Act I: Setting Up ShopAct I: Setting Up Shop
    6. 6. 4 Key Questions But before you open up shop, you need to ask yourself these four questions: a.What is my office trying to accomplish through social media? b.Who is my audience, and what do they want? c.Who will work in my social media shop? d.What resources will I need to devote to that shop to keep it running, and where will they come from? Act I: Setting Up ShopAct I: Setting Up Shop
    7. 7. How the USDA addresses this: Key Requirements: Mission Goals Why does this technology meet those goals Understanding your audience Understanding the content Evaluation and success By answering these questions, each office can adjust the exact mix of their social media to yield optimal results. Questions? New Media Request Form Act I: Setting Up ShopAct I: Setting Up Shop
    8. 8. What is my office trying to accomplish through social media? Are you trying simply to share the content from your Web site? •As a one way comms channel? Like a press release? •How many of you are looking to do that—share content from your website through social media or drive traffic to your site? Or are you looking to spur people to some kind of action online… •sharing your content, or donating or generation their own? (Retweets, shares, commenting on your blogs) …Or are you trying to encourage people to take action offline? •Drink more water Drink Up, the First Lady’s Campaign to get Americans to drink more water •Get a flu shot •Recycle Or are you trying to spark a dialogue—either between your agency and its audience or among the members of your audience itself? •interest in your site through content generation/content sharing Do you want them to do something beyond simply consuming your content (while still sitting at their desk) • See EPA Greenversation, but have a comments policy, after each post no less…—very robust social media practices led by very engaged social media managers >>For each of these, there is a different social medium that will best suit the need and a different success metric. Act I: Setting Up ShopAct I: Setting Up Shop
    9. 9. What is the irreducible element and why does it matter? TEXT Social Networks Examples: Facebook, GovLoop, Google+, Linked In Good for: sparking discussion among audience. Blogs (with or without comments): Example: DipNote; Greenversation Good for: Quick communication with audience. When comments are enabled, good for sparking discussion both among audience, and between audience and blogger. Microblogs Example: Twitter, Yammer Good for: Quick sharing of links, facts, and questions. Good for taking the pulse of an organization or a snapshot of an event. Act I: Setting Up ShopAct I: Setting Up Shop
    10. 10. Irreducible Element: Image/Microvideo IMAGE/MICROVIDEO Examples: Instagram, Vine, Pinterest Irreducible element: Image Great for: Scanning visual information (think: food, jewelry,) or presenting demonstrations very quickly and in a mobile-friendly format; bandwidth requirements are different and much reduced over extended video or A/V; default for Vine is with audio off…notable…a YouTube video with no audio, less likely to make sense… Act I: Setting Up ShopAct I: Setting Up Shop
    11. 11. Irreducible Element: Video VIDEO Example: YouTube Irreducible element: A/V Great for: adding high-touch element to social media mix. You may want to disable comments. Also good for longer-form information sharing, where a 6,000-word blog post might not attract any real audience, a 6-minute video might be more effective. Act I: Setting Up ShopAct I: Setting Up Shop
    12. 12. Irreducible Element: Ideation, Surveys, Slides…but So What? WHAT ELSE IS THERE? Ideation / Survey: IdeaScale, Survey Monkey. Irreducible element: question You can use surveys or set up ideation platforms to solicit feedback from your audience. Documents: Scribd, SlideShare Irreducible element: PDF, DOC, or other file Good for sharing PowerPoint decks, Word Documents, and other files. Why does this matter? Because if you are a shop that does a lot of writing and you want to be on Pinterest, now you need someone who takes pictures… Act I: Setting Up ShopAct I: Setting Up Shop
    13. 13. Questions?
    14. 14. Act II: Stocking the Shelves >>Recap: Act I > Mission > Know Your Audience > Choose Your Channels Key Question Becomes: Act II: Stocking the ShelvesAct II: Stocking the Shelves
    15. 15. A Closer Look: The State Department Act II: Stocking the ShelvesAct II: Stocking the Shelves By The Numbers (Feb 2012 npr.org) Number of State Department Twitter accounts: 195 Number of Facebook accounts: 288 Number of foreign language Twitter feeds: 11 (Arabic, Chinese, Farsi, French, English, Hindi, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Turkish and Urdu)
    16. 16. 3 Mortal Enemies of Old Fashioned Content Creation/Management Act II: Stocking the ShelvesAct II: Stocking the Shelves  Large, decentralized organizations (HQ, Embassies, Consulates, Field Offices)  Regular, widespread turnover (PCS, Deployment, Reservist, Foreign Service)  Varying levels of technical savvy within a given workforce (Rotation heavy and assigned regardless of technical background) This leads to the pantry problem: You buy more of what you already have and don’t really need.
    17. 17. CMS Example: Thismoment Act II: Stocking the ShelvesAct II: Stocking the Shelves
    18. 18. 3 Key Elements to Look for in a CMS Act II: Stocking the ShelvesAct II: Stocking the Shelves a. Supports Goals Where are you users? (i.e. desktop, mobile) How do they consume? (photos, videos, messaging) Multi-Distribution Points? Localization? Analytics? a. Easy User Interface Preferably drop and drag Allows for continuity of operations when the social media manager is out/ enables people of all technical levels to make changes a. Dependability Demand to see examples supporting your goals Review Service Level Agreements (SLA) Uptime and Support Future Proofing …leads to better coordination, quality control, and efficiencies
    19. 19. Brand challenges are changing UNIVERSAL ALWAYS ON DIFFERENTIATED
    20. 20. Teams are struggling to meet them POINT SOLUTIONS MANUAL WORKFLOW CUSTOM R&D POOR GOVERANCE
    21. 21. More Stakeholders, More Requirements CREATIVE power • flexibility MANAGERS visibility • collaboration BUSINESS UNITS access • autonomy BUSINESS efficiency • results LEGAL process • compliance IT security • controls
    22. 22. Manage/Creat e •Brand •Curated •User Generated Content (UGC) •Engagement modules •Responsive templates or custom design How DEC Works Measure •Traffic •Clicks •Consumption •Conversion •Time engaged Engage •Conflate messages •Authenttication •Contest management and moderation •Workflow Scale Predictable price, features and timeline Central admin and governance Cloud-based delivery platform Worry-free monitoring and support Future Proofing Distribute •Earned, Owned & Paid •Devices (Mobile, Home) •Digital our of Home •Regions/languages •Scheduling
    23. 23. Powered by Thismoment Multimedia Theater Social sharing and conversation Content brand and user-generated Next steps download, buy, register, come back The Experience is the Brand
    24. 24. Live Thismoment DECs Visit: HERE User Name: tm Password: dynamicbrandexperience
    25. 25. So now what? Act II: Stocking the ShelvesAct II: Stocking the Shelves Now that you know what you have, you need to know what your audience is responding to, so you can give them more of what you want, and develop more engaging content based on their behavior. BINGO! >>Act I recap: Mission? Audience? Audience Role? .> Act II recap: Create the Content > Disseminate it Effectively and Efficiently Across Various Channels<< The Next Step is Critical! It will close the loop between putting out your content and going into your next iteration. Change your behavior to reinforce good trends
    26. 26. Questions?
    27. 27. Act III: Analyzing Sales to Spur Growth Act III: Analyzing Sales to Spur GrowthAct III: Analyzing Sales to Spur Growth Social Media Metrics Matter It is important to know what you want from your audience so you know what to measure! BUT Let mission determine your metrics, don’t let metrics determine your mission!
    28. 28. Thismoment Reporting Capabilities Gain Clear & Detailed Visibility into the State of Your Overall Social Campaigns as well as on a Brand by Brand Country by Country Basis Traffic and Content PerformanceIndividual Module PerformanceDashboards for corporate and each dealership Track sharing across social media platforms
    29. 29. Questions?
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×