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  • 1. Landmark Supreme Court Cases Process Continued Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for 12th Grade (Civics) Designed by Jennifer Dinsmoor [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page
  • 2. Introduction Process Continued Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Welcome! You are about to embark on a journey through time. Throughout the United States history, there have been many Supreme Court cases that have put our Constitution to the test. These cases have also brought up new issues the creators of the Constitution could not have foreseen and have therefore set a precedent for how future situations will be handled. You will now become a Supreme Court Justice. As a justice you will be assigned one of five cases and after reviewing the case and listening to opinions from both sides, you will make a decision. You will be given many resources one of the most important being the Constitution, specifically, the Bill of Rights, all of which you will be locating on the Internet. After you are finish with this all important task you should have a very good idea about how justice is served in the United States.
  • 3. The Task Process Continued Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] As a Supreme Court Justice you will be residing over one main case. As a Supreme Court Justice you are not determining a punishment for the parties involved. Rather you are determining the Constitutionality of the case and whether the decisions made by the previous judge were Constitutional or not. You should have some background knowledge from class as to what Supreme Court Judges do and how they reach decisions but most of your information will come from Internet sites listed in the Process section of this WebQuest. Your task will be to create a presentation of some kind whether it be a Powerpoint presentation, word document, poster, etc. that shows the decisions you reached and most importantly why. This presentation should be directed towards your fellow justices to persuade them to take your side. You will be evaluated on your presentation by your fellow justices and the President (Your Teacher) so make sure it is thorough and complete! Good Luck! Title
  • 4. The Process Process Continued Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
    • You are acting alone in this project because that is how Supreme Court Justices reached their decision before conferring with their fellow justices. Before you begin your research, you will be given a Case Journal/Organizer that lists the essential questions you should answer in order to reach a “fair” and “just” decision. This will help you organize your research and comments in order for you to make the best presentation possible. So with your journal (and pencil) in hand follow these steps to complete your mission:
    • Step 1: Gather Case Materials!
    • Find background information on what actually happened:
    • (The web sites you will need are listed on the next page)
    • From this resource you should be able to answer what happened, who are the parties involved, what facts are important, what decision was reached and see if there is any information missing
    • Step 2: Find and review the arguments in favor and against the court decision:
    • From the following websites you should be able to answer what the arguments are and why they are being argued but also which one do you most agree with and why? To help you with this question ask yourself what the consequences would be if either course of action was taken.
    • Step 3: Make Your Decision!!!
    • First find out what the main issue or amendment is that is being questioned.
    • Next you will need to ask yourself was what happened legal? What is public opinion on the issue? (Should it be legal?) What values do you think are in conflict here?
    • And ultimately WAS THE DECISION CONSTITUTIONAL? (For this you can use prior knowledge from class and the Bill of Rights as a reference).
  • 5. The Process Continued Process Continued Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Here are the websites for your specific cases: These should give you all you need to fill out your journals! For Plessy v. Ferguson: http://www.oyez.org/cases/1851-1900/1895/1895_210/ http://www.landmarkcases.org/plessy/background2.html http://www.landmarkcases.org/plessy/courtsystem.html http://www.landmarkcases.org/plessy/excerpts_maj.html http://www.landmarkcases.org/plessy/excerpts_min.html For Korematsu v. United States: http://www.oyez.org/cases/1940-1949/1944/1944_22/ http://www.landmarkcases.org/korematsu/background2.html http://www.landmarkcases.org/korematsu/diagram_courtsystem.html http://www.landmarkcases.org/korematsu/opinion2_dissent.html For Brown v. Board of Education http://www.oyez.org/cases/1950-1959/1952/1952_1/ http://www.landmarkcases.org/brown/background2.html http://www.landmarkcases.org/brown/courtsystem.html http://www.landmarkcases.org/brown/opinion1.html For Roe v. Wade http://www.oyez.org/cases/1970-1979/1971/1971_70_18/ http://www.landmarkcases.org/roe/background2.html http://www.landmarkcases.org/roe/diagram_courtsystem.html http://www.landmarkcases.org/roe/opinion1_majority.html http://www.landmarkcases.org/roe/opinion2_dissent.html For Texas v. Johnson http://www.oyez.org/cases/1980-1989/1988/1988_88_155/ http://www.landmarkcases.org/texas/background2.html http://www.landmarkcases.org/texas/courtsystem.html http://www.landmarkcases.org/texas/excerpts_maj.html http://www.landmarkcases.org/texas/excerpts_diss.html   Bill of Rights: http://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/constitution.billofrights.html
  • 6. Evaluation Process Continued Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Categories Excellent Average Poor Total Case Journal Case journal is complete, answers all questions and is accurate and thorough (15-20 points) Case journal answers all questions with some mistakes but is still complete (10-15 points) Case journal is poorly done, is incomplete and not accurate (0-10 points) Presentation mechanics and organization Presentation is well organized with little or no errors and is easy to understand (6-8 points) Presentation is organized with a few errors but still easy to follow (4-6 points) Presentation has poor organization with errors throughout and not easy to follow (0-4 points) Presentation effectiveness Presentation reflects advanced understanding of project, convinces audience of argument and covers all questions from journal (15-20 points) Presentation reflects an understanding of project, covers most questions from journal and convinces most of audience (10-15 points) Presentation reflects a low level of understanding, missing many questions from journal and does not convince audience of findings (0-9 points) Presentation creativity and flow Project is presented in a creative and unique way, grasping attention of audience and flows Project is creative and flows well Project quality is poor, awkward and does not flow well
  • 7. Conclusion Process Continued Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Congratulations! You have just resided over one of the most important cases in U.S. History. If you convince your fellow justices’ to agree with you, your opinion will set precedent for future cases! One thing to think about as you prepare to give your presentation is what is justice to you? Does being just always mean being fair? Why should a document that was written so long ago affect major decisions being made today?
  • 8. Credits & References Process Continued Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Pictures: Title Page- http://www.laapush.org/environmentalspectrum_files/images/supreme_court_building.JPG Internet Sources: Landmarkcases.org oyez.org Law.cornell.edu Thanks to: Dr. Folkstead for template and many resources Professor Long for inspiration Brian Lancaster for Evaluation and critique For latest version and template go to: www.webquest.org
  • 9. Landmark Supreme Court Cases(Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page A WebQuest for 12th Grade (Civics) Designed by Jenny Dinsmoor [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 10. Introduction (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson was developed for a student based learning project on Webquests in Dr. Folkstead’s Educational Technology Class. This lesson is part of a unit based on the three branches of government for a 12 th Grade Civics class. This particular lesson is meant to deepen students’ understanding of the Judicial Branch and more specifically, the Supreme Court. This lesson should leave students with a better understanding of what the Supreme Court does and its impact on everyday lives. It will also help them make a connection as to what justice means for us as Americans and how the Bill of Rights actually fits into society today. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 11. Learners (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson was developed for the 12 th grade and involves Civics but also dives into U.S. History as well. Before conducting this project students should have core knowledge about our government structure but more specifically the judicial structure. They should know that the Supreme Court is the highest court in the nation and they should know its rights and limitations. They should also know about Supreme Court justices. For example how long they can serve, how they get elected into their position, etc. Students should also know the basics of our U.S. Constitution which includes the Bill of Rights and they should know the amendments listed there. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 12. Curriculum Standards (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • Civic and Social Studies Standards Addressed
      • Understand how citizens exercise the roles, rights and responsibilities of participation in civic life* at all levels - local, state and national.
      • Comparing and contrasting various ideas about the purposes of government.
      • Analyzing and knowing how different forms of government impact the individual
      • Explaining how the United States Constitution is a vehicle for continuity and preserving liberty, yet allows for change
    • This lesson will also help students:
    • Make critical thinking judgments about important themes in History
    • Creativity and persuasion skills
    • Presentation production and organization
    • Problem solve based on real-life situations and evidence from the past
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 13. The Process (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson is designed to take place after a week or so of class based on the three branches of government with the two or three days before this project focused on the Judicial Branch. This project should take a week to complete including presentations and debate. This is an interdisciplinary lesson and can be correlated with the U.S. History class when they are discussing the founding of the Constitution. Students will be working alone and then discussing as a class the decisions they made. The teacher should have a solid knowledge base on the Supreme Court and Landmark cases and how they turned out in order to conduct this lesson. They should also know how to lead a debate because the presentation part requires debate to take place. The WebQuest should take place in a computer lab where each student has access to a computer and should allow enough class time to finish this for those students who don’t have access to a computer at home Variations If you wanted to do this without computers you could simply have students form five groups in class and then give them folders that contain each case with the evidence and opinions in them and they could spend time researches the files and then presenting them to the class. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 14. Resources (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • Describe what's needed to implement this lesson. Some of the possibilities:
      • Copies of the “Case Journal” which provides students with a sort of outline for research and all of the essential questions they should answer.
      • Additional reference material i.e. library access in case they want to further research their specific cases.
    • Here are the websites used in this project:
    • www.landmarkcases.org
    • www.oyez.org/cases
    • http://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/constitution.billofrights.html
    • This project should be easy enough for just the one teacher to handle. If you want you could coordinate with the History teacher to make this an interdisciplinary project that can count for both classes.
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 15. Evaluation (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson will be successful if the presentations inspire thoughtful discussion in the classroom about our Constitution and justice. This is what the whole lesson is about. They are experiencing for themselves what it is like to make serious decisions and the process it takes to make them last. Please see the student section for the rubric used to grade them on this project Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 16. Teacher Script (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page The WebQuest model is best suited for learners who can navigate the Web on their own and can read the kinds of material commonly found on the Web. We can stretch the format to reach primary-aged learners, developmental English Language Learners and special populations by creating a facilitated WebQuest, one that requires an adult or older peer to drive things. To start the lesson you will have to introduce what they will be doing. So as a “hook” you should have a picture from a recent Supreme Court cases that they won’t be researching in the project. Begin class by describing the picture and telling the story about the case. You can find almost any one of the cases online. Before leading students to the computer lab, you should give them their Case Journals where they will be taking all there notes and this will give them a way of organizing their findings. While in the computer lab: Students should know how to navigate through the WebQuest because it is very straightforward and I have tried to address all questions by laying out a step by step process for them to take. The part that might get the most questions is how to connect the case to the Constitution. Just tell them to identify where in the bill of Rights their specific case deals with. If they truly can’t find them just let them know. Then ask them if they think this person’s actions were in accordance with this amendment. Ask them how they think the creators of the Constitution meant for the amendment to be judged. This Webquest should take one or two days, the making of the presentation should take two or three days and the presentations should take two days. After the have all their questions answered they can still use the computer to make their presentations. To help the facilitator, you might want to include screen dumps of particular screens embedded with the directions of what to do at that point. This page is linked to the Process segment off of the Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 17. Conclusion (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson should leave students feeling like they know a little bit more about their government and how it makes decisions for them. Hopefully, they will leave feeling inspired to participate more in their government and feeling more personally connected to it. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 18. Credits & References (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Pictures: Title Page- http://www.laapush.org/environmentalspectrum_files/images/supreme_court_building.JPG Internet Sources: Landmarkcases.org oyez.org Law.cornell.edu Thanks to: Dr. Folkstead for template and many resources Professor Long for inspiration Brian Lancaster for Evaluation and critique For latest version and template go to: www.webquest.org