Differentiation in guided reading pdf

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  • 1. Differentiation in Guided Reading www.jensweigart.blogspot.com Every Kid Needs a Champion Video Unpacking Balanced Literacy By Jen Sweigart, M.Ed 3rd Grade Teacher Hillside Elementary School Fulton County Schools
  • 2. Daily Warm-Up: Observation vs Inference A Close Reading of a Daily Picture
  • 3. A Close Reading of a Picture A Close Reading of a Daily Picture
  • 4. Essential Questions What are the important components of a Balanced Literacy Reading Workshop? How do I differentiate work stations with various levels of ability? How can I use informal, brief assessments to drive my guided reading instruction? What strategies can I incorporate for high Text engagement?
  • 5. Today’s Focus: Differentiation during Reading Workshop Student Choice Responding to Individual Reading Levels Alternatives at the Reading Table that promote High Text Engagement
  • 6. The Goal of Differentiation The goal of a differentiated classroom is maximum student growth and individual success. Differentiation is a lot like fishing… Bait the hook with what the fish like, not what the fisherman likes. Gregory & Chapman (2002)
  • 7. Balanced Literacy Gradual Release of Responsibility Modeled Reading Shared Reading Guided Reading Every Kid Needs a Champion ~ Get to Know Your Students Independent Reading
  • 8. Balanced Literacy is more like cooking than baking… Differentiation Modeled Writing Assessments Guided Writing Shared Writing ...a pinch of this, a smidge of that, add a little zest. Amounts vary. It is not an exact science or prescribed recipe. Lessons are built off of a standard, driven by assessments, and individualized to the student.
  • 9. Using Lucy Calkins’ Pushing Your Thinking Stems to Integrate Comprehension and Writing Focus Strategy: Connecting Focus Standard: CCGPS 3.RI.2Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea. Balanced Lit Continuum: Introduce in Shared Reading, and then transfer the activity to your Reading Comprehension Work Station or Guided Reading Text: Dismantling the Myth of Learning to Read and Reading to Learn by Houck and Ross of www. ascd.org Response: Let’s have a BLOCK PARTY!
  • 10. Using Lucy Calkins’ Pushing Your Thinking Stems to Integrate Comprehension and Writing Step 1: Initial Reading: Read the selected text. Use Think Marks to code the text as you read. Aim for 3-2-1: 3 Important Parts 2 Surprising Parts 1 Confusing or Wonder Parts *Jot your question(s) in the margins.
  • 11. Using Lucy Calkins’ Pushing Your Thinking Stems to Integrate Comprehension and Writing Step 2: Block Party ~ Mingle and Share Move about the room to find a partner. Go to a question station with your partner. Step 3: Block Party ~ Write in the Air & Respond Read the writing stem on the chart paper. Turn to a partner and respond verbally to a question prompt to organize your thoughts. You must say out loud what you plan to write before writing it on paper. Then, jot your response on the paper. Step 4: Block Party ~ Mingle and Share Move about the room to find a different partner two more times (a total of 3 responses). Writing Prompts: What’s the big idea of the text? ~ In other words… ~ I realize… ~ The surprising thing about this… ~ I’d like to ask the author… ~ So I guess what I’m really thinking is… ~ I used to think, but now I believe…
  • 12. Management of the Reading Workshop: Class Norms Needed Resources Scheduling Differentiated Workstations
  • 13. Establish Class Norms
  • 14. Needed Resources Sticky Notes & Highlighters Leveled Books & texts (2nd-5th www.readworks.org & other site links on www.jensweigart.blogspot.com ) Reader’s Notebook Word Wall Stop Watch Book Boxes Manipulatives for K-2 (letters, sight word cards, word sorts, reading phones, white boards, dice) Non-fiction Media for 3-5 (Scholastic News, Super Science Magazine, Time for Kids, Edmodo accounts)
  • 15. 7:50-8:00 8:00-8:15 8:15-8:30 8:30-9:30 Integrated Technology 9:30 – 11:30 11:40- 12:25 12:30-1:30 1:35- 2:15 Morning Meeting Read Aloud that integrates Science or Social Studies content Mini-Lesson / Shared Reading using Integrated Science or Social Studies text Reading Workshop Rotations (15-20 minutes) • Guided Reading Groups (Leveled) • Writing & Research (Project-driven) • Skill Review – Word Work, Fluency, Comprehension, etc Math & Lunch Writing Workshop Specials / Recess 1:1 Conferencing, RTI, Self-Selected Reading, Book Clubs, Word Work Integrated Science & Social Studies A Day in The Life of a Balanced Literacy Classroom (Workshop: 3 groups every day, or 6 groups over 2 days)
  • 16. 7:50-9:00 9:00-9:30 9:30-9:45 9:45-10:20 10:20-12:20 12:20 – 1:15 Integrated Technology 1:15-1:50 1:50- 2:15 Math Team Time Read Aloud that integrates Science or Social Studies content Mini-Lesson / Shared Reading using Integrated Science or Social Studies text Lunch, Recess, Specials Reading Workshop Guided Reading Groups (pulled throughout the session) Workstations Using a Contract for Assignments Writing Workshop 1:1 Conferencing, Self-Selected Reading Integrated Science & Social Studies A Day in The Life of a Balanced Literacy Classroom Reading Workshop (Workstation Contract)
  • 17. Shifting to Balanced Literacy Workstations Literacy Work Stations vs Work Station materials or tasks are introduced through Modeled and Shared instructional times before being placed in work station for independent Work Station materials or tasksby standards. use. Tasks are driven are introduced through Modeled and Shared instructional times before being Work work station for independent use. Tasks are driven placed inStations remain primarily the same by standards. throughout the year, but change in Work Stations remain primarily the same throughout the difficulty levels, target skills, skills, and topic. year, but change in difficulty levels, targetand topic. All students go to workto work part of their as part All students go stations as stations daily schedule. The work is differentiated according to skill level. of their daily schedule. The work is The teacher meets with guided reading groupslevel. differentiated according to skill and does individual reading conferences during work station time. The teacher meets with guided reading groups and does individual reading conferences during work station time. Traditional Work Stations Work materials were typically introduced all at once and were typically not used during direct instruction time. Work materials were typically introduced all at once and were typically not used during direct instruction time. Centers were usually changed weekly according to units of study. Centers were usually changed weekly according to units of study. Centers were used used as motivators, Centers were as motivators, enrichment, or for students that had finished their work. The center activities were the same enrichment,of skill level. or for students that had for all regardless The teacher may have been The center activities finished their work. running a small group or whole group werereadingsame for all regardless of skill the lesson. level. The teacher may have been running a small group or whole group reading lesson.
  • 18. Reading Workshop Stations by Grade Work Stations Word Study Technology Writing with Purpose Reading Practice (integrated content w/response) Self-Selected Reading Kindergarten – 2nd Phonics & Sight Words (Daily 5 – Word Work) Skill Review, Ipad, or Listening Center (Daily 5 – Listen to Reading) Developmental Writing Skills, Write the Room (Daily 5 – Work on Writing) Buddy Reading to improve Fluency, Decoding Skills, and Comprehension (Daily 5 – Read to Someone) Independent Reading (Daily 5 – Read to Self) BUIL D STAMINA 3rd 4th & 5th Word Sorts, Affixes & Root Words, Content Words 60% Skill Review & 40% Project-Based Learning Affixes & Root Words, Content Words 70% Project-Based Learning & 30% Skill Review Writing Skills ~ Targeted standards-based writing tasks that support the reading standards Reading for Information (Non-fiction) short leveled text & Comprehension Response; Book Clubs Science & Social Studies Content-Based Reading for Information (Nonfiction) leveled text & Comprehension Response; Book Clubs Independent Reading with a Independent Reading Reading Response with a Reading Response
  • 19. Differentiated Workstations Rotations Option #1 – Small Groups Rotate Together Tasks are differentiated by groups Small homogenous group of learners support each other during time away from the teacher by completing the same tasks and reading the same level of text. The tasks and texts are based on the independent reading level of the group. Insert pic of math groups
  • 20. Differentiated Workstations Rotations Option #2 – Heterogeneous Groups of students complete leveled tasks using a Workshop contract Tasks are differentiated by student needs. Students are given a “Workshop Contract” at the beginning of the week. Students have to complete a certain number of tasks by the end of the week. Students select their tasks based on a color-coded system (mine matches our Media Center’s “Just Right Book” color levels.) Teacher calls students away from work stations when it’s time for a guided reading session. Advantage ~ Students aren’t tied to a 20 minute segment Disadvantage ~ Students must learn to manage their time throughout the week.
  • 21. Differentiated Workstations Rotations Option #2 – Heterogeneous Groups of students complete leveled tasks using a Workshop contract Insert colorcoded station tasks
  • 22. Differentiating with: Choice Boards Dinner Menus Leveled Reading Texts Book Clubs Edmodo Assignments Tiered Lessons Project-Based Learning Webquests Individual Goal Setting using Data
  • 23. Websites for Workstation Ideas http://tunstalltimes.blogspot.com/2012/11/longestpostever.html http://www.lauracandler.com/strategies/balancedlit.php http://www.jmeacham.com/balanced%20literacy/balanced.literacy.guided .reading.htm http://hil.troy.k12.mi.us/staff/bnewingham/myweb3/ http://www.thedailycafe.com/public/department104.cfm http://fabulous-fourth.blogspot.com/p/literacy-workstations.html http://www.ateacherstreasure.com/2012/11/5th-grade-literacycenters.html http://serenadetosecondgrade.blogspot.com/2011/07/literacy-workstations-centers-freebie.html
  • 24. Literacy Work Stations Resources Organization K-5 Workstation Easy to Implement Ideas www.jensweigart.blogspot.com 10 Minutes for Exploration
  • 25. Planning for Guided Reading How do I meet the needs of the varied readers and writers?
  • 26. 4 Elements for Teaching Guided Reading: Assessments drive the instructional focus Coaching the students’ use of reading strategies when encountering difficulties Direct Instruction of Skills Utlilizing Guided Writing to accelerate the reading growth ~The Next Steps in Guided Reading by Jan Richardson
  • 27. Developmental Stages of Reading Reading Stage Emergent Early Transitional Fluent Fountas & Pinnell Letters A-C D-I J-P Q-Z Text Level Range Kindergarten 1st 2nd-3rd 4th-6th *When we differentiate, teachers have to let go of their identity with a specific grade!
  • 28. Developmental Stages of Reading Sort
  • 29. Assessing & Grouping Students STAR Reading Universal Screening ~ Records: Set Up Instructional Groupings& View Suggested Skilks: 3 times a year STAR Progress Monitoring for students below grade level ~ every two weeks Fountas & Pinnell BAS (Benchmark Assessment System) ~ A-Z: 3 times a year DRA (Developmental Reading Assessment) ~ 1-80 (2-3 times a year) Brief Running Records conducted during guided reading: as needed Conferencing: once every two weeks *Professional Judgment ~ What reading behaviors do you see?
  • 30. How often should groups meet? Teachers create Guided Reading schedules after considering the following variables: Reading Levels and Needs: What do the group of students need? Size: How many students in the group? Frequency: How often will you meet with them? Time: How long will the lesson last?
  • 31. How often should groups meet? Foundation, Emergent and Early groups are: • Small (3–5 students), • Meeting frequently (every day for struggling readers), • Meeting for short periods of time (10–15 minutes). • Transitional and Fluent groups are: • Larger (4-6 students), • Meeting less frequently (3 times per week), and • Meeting for longer periods of time (20–30 minutes).
  • 32. Transitional (J-P) Fluent (Q-Z) Before Reading Sight Word Review – Writing (Levels A-E) Introduce New Book Introduce new vocabulary Establish a purpose for reading During Text Reading with Prompting Reading (Record Anecdotal Notes) Introduce New Book Introduce new vocabulary Establish a purpose for reading Introduce vocabulary, Preview and Predict (the entire book) Establish a purpose for reading Choose 1 or 2 Teaching Points Each Day (decoding, Fluency, Vocabulary or Comprehension) Students read silently or whisper read *1:1 Conferencing and Notes After Reading *Connect back to original purpose (EQ) Discussion Prompt Word Study (Pick 1: Sound boxes, Making a Big Word, Analogy Chart) Model the Strategy (comprehension or vocabulary) Students read silently and respond *Students write as they read Note observations and scaffolds Discussion and Teaching Points Words for New Word List (kept in Reader’s Notebook) DAY 1 Emergent (A-C) & Early (D-I) Discussion Prompt Teach 1 Sight Word : (Levels A-E) Word Study (Pick 1: Sound Sort, Making Words, Sound Boxes, Analogy Charts for after level C)
  • 33. DAY 2 Emergent (A-C) & Early (D-I) Transitional (J-P) Before Reading Sight Word Review – Writing Review 1-2 Teaching (Levels A-E) Points (decoding, Fluency, Vocabulary or Comprehension) During Reading Re-read Day 1’s book (and Students continue first other familiar books) reading Record Observations Record Notes After Reading Select Teaching Points Discussion Prompt Teach the Same Sight Word as Day 1 Guided Writing: Dictated or open-ended sentence (A-C) Levels D-E: 2 sentences Levels E-F: Beginning-MiddleEnd (3 Sentences) Levels G-I: BME (4 Sentences) or Somebody, Wanted, But, So (SWBS) Fluent (Q-Z) Preview next text portion Discuss New Vocabulary Review the Strategy Students Read and Respond *Students write as they read Note observations and scaffolds Discussion Prompt Discussion and Word Study (Pick 1: Teaching Points Sound boxes, Making a Words for New Word Big Word, Analogy Chart List (kept in Reader’s Notebook)
  • 34. DAY 3+ Emergent (A-C) & Early (DI) Transitional (J-P) Before Reading During Reading After Reading Re-read for Fluency Guided Writing (Could start a projectbased learning piece) Fluent (Q-Z) (Days 3- end of Book) Preview next text portion Discuss New Vocabulary Review the Strategy Students Read and Respond *Students write as they read Note observations and scaffolds Discussion and Teaching Points Words for New Word List (kept in Reader’s Notebook) *Guided Writing for struggling writers
  • 35. 5 Minute Break: What does your Shoulder Buddy think? What are you already doing successfully in your classroom? What are the barriers you’re facing in your guided reading group or reading workshop?
  • 36. “Leslie was huddled next to one of the cracks below the roof trying to get enough light to read.” --- Bridge to Terabithia, By Katherine Paterson
  • 37. Theater Techniques: Sitting Statues and Tableaux ~ All Levels (K-5) In theater, a tableau is a frozen silent picture a group of actors make with their bodies to show a moment in time. Tableau can be used to visually and physically depict character relationships, environment, scenes, emotions, events, ideas, and themes within a story. Statue is a frozen silent picture an individual actor makes with his whole body to represent a moment in time. Statues may show characters, setting details, emotions, objects, and ideas within a story. Vocal Expression is the range of vocal qualities used when reading or acting to show what a character is thinking, feeling, and wanting in a given moment.
  • 38. Theater techniques: Sitting Statues and Tableaux Standards Addressed: • Character perspective: What a character is thinking and believes about a problem or situation • Character traits: Features usually displayed by a character such as how they look, feel, or act that tells us about their personality and helps the reader understand the story • Making inferences: Inferring is the process of taking what is in the text, but not explicitly stated by the author, and combining it with relevant background knowledge to make meaning • Story elements: The key elements that create a cohesive story including character, setting, problem, events, and resolution • Summarization: Briefly restating the main points of a text • Prosody: Reading with expression
  • 39. Theater Techniques: Sitting Statues and Tableaux Student Directions in Guided Reading Discussion Section: From The Real Story of the Three Little Pigs: “Show me a sitting statue of when the wolf feeling misunderstood and wrongly accused. 3-2-1 Freeze! When I touch your shoulder, vocalize what the wolf might say.” In Nonfiction, Paul Revere Social Studies unit, “Show my a statue of a Patriot….Loyalist. 3-2-1 Freeze! When I touch your shoulder, vocalize what a Patriot might say.” As you read the text, place a star next to the 3 most important sections of the text. In literature – problem, climax, and resolution. Then, give the group 2 minutes to develop a group tableau depicting the scene.
  • 40. Sketch to Stretch Graffiti Tables (K-5) ~ Excellent for Struggling Readers K-2 completes “After Reading” and 3rd-5th completes “During Reading” Silently sketch pictures to represent the text. Groups members discuss each sketch, and then artist share’s his/her perceptions. Writing Stem Responses Illustrate Informational Text Features to Support the passage
  • 41. Literature Circle with Informational Text ~Extension for Fluent Students Circles can deepen and enhance understanding of text, build motivation for reading, and expand oral language. Lit Circles are not the best tool for teaching reading strategies, though. The Teacher’s Role: To quietly guarantee the success of the discussion, and guide students to extend their thinking.
  • 42. Literature Circle with Informational Text ~Extension for Advanced Students Key Points to Success for Literate Conversations: Model, Model, Model before moving slowly to independence Guide students to Extend their thinking: “What an interesting thought. Can anyone else link up to that?” Encourage the use of evidence: “ I wonder if someone can find something in the text to help us” Assist in clarifying ideas: “I’m not sure I understand. Can you tell us more?” Support participation from all students: “ Jonathan, you have great ideas. What are your thoughts?
  • 43. Turn & Talk with Think Dots (K-5: Level The Questions) Writing in the Margins of Complex Text with Think Dots (3rd-5th)
  • 44. 3-2-1 Think Marks 3 Important Parts 2 Surprising Parts 1 Confusing or I Wonder Parts
  • 45. Read, Cover, Remember, Retell ~Early to Transitional Readers Some readers will continue reading even when they don’t understand the material. This process supports readers by stopping them frequently to THINK about the meaning. READ only as much as you can cover with your hand. COVER the words with your hands. REMEMBER what you have just read. (It’s OK to take another look) RETELL what you just read inside your head or to a partner.
  • 46. Quick Comprehension Tasks for Early – Transitional Readers You know these....but with the constant drum of new initiatives and flood of information, we sometimes forget the basics! B-M-E: Beginning-Middle-End Literature: Students take turns telling what happened at the beginning, middle, and end of the narrative. Informational: Students stop at 3 sticky note points and summarize the text. S-W-B-S: Somebody-Wanted-But-So (Literature) Students recall the character (Somebody), the character’s goal (Wanted), the conflict (But), and the resolution (So). Who & What: (Informational) Student summarizes each page by saying or writing a summary of Who the text is about and What happened or was learned. Five Finger Retell: (Literature) Use the fingers on one hand to recall and retell the 5 story elements. Use the palm of the hand for the theme.
  • 47. Quick Comprehension Tasks for Fluent Readers *Use the strategy and genre to support the CCGPS standard Comprehension-Fiction           Retell Visualize Predict & Support Make Connections Character Traits Ask Questions Determine Importance Cause and Effect Character Analysis Make Inferences from dialogue, action, or physical descrption Comprehension-NonFiction  Retell  Ask Questions  Summarize with Key Words  Main Idea & Detail  Important/Interesting  Interpreting Text Features  Compare & Contrast  Cause & Effect  Evaluate – fact/opinion, author’s point of view Comprehension-Poetry         Clarify Visualize Make Connections Ask Literal Questions Summarize Make inferences Draw Conclusions Interpret author’s purpose  Figurative Language * These reading strategies are taught to all students through Modeled/Shared.
  • 48. Word Study (Brief work at the end of a lesson or in work stations) Sound Boxes Making Words Analogy Charts Personal Word Wall (Fluent)
  • 49. Guided Writing through Reading Groups Guided Writing occurs the day after students finish reading the text It varies based on the text structure of the book, and your standard 7 strategy choice.
  • 50. Responses to Fiction (Transitional & Fluent) Character Analysis – Students create a web of character traits, and then write a paragraph about the character, using examples from the story. I Poems – Students select a character and write a poem from that character’s POV. Some sample prompts include: I am…, I wonder… , I worry…, I dream… Microthemes - What was the author’s message? What did the character learn that you can apply to your life? Write a reponse. Alternate Ending - Students write an alternate ending that describes what could have happened and what the consequences would have been. *Your focus with each student may be individualized. Conduct short conferences during this time, guiding the students where each student needs growth.
  • 51. Responses to Non-Fiction (Transitional & Fluent) BioPoems – Students follow a predetermined structure to write a poem about a famous person. Ex: Line 1: First Name Line 2: Four traits that describe the person Line 3: Who needs…(three items) Line 4: Who fears…(three items) Line 5: Who gives…(three items) Line 6: Last Name Text Structure Responses Ex: Compare and Contrast Ideas in the text Compare two historical events Main Idea & Detail Response – Students use the chapter titles and headings to write a paragraph that uses details and examples from the text to explain the main idea.
  • 52. Elevator Speech What is Guided Reading?
  • 53. “We’ve taught you that the earth is round, That red and white make pink, And something else that matters moreWe’ve taught you how to think.” --Hooray for Diffendoofer Day! By Dr. Seuss
  • 54. Hoyt, Linda. 2002. Make it Real. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Moore, Sharon. 2004 Conversations in Four-Blocks Classrooms. Greensboro, NC: Carson-Dellosa Publishing, Inc. Richardson, Jan. 2009. The Next Step in Guided Reading. New York: Scholastic Inc. Seravallo, Jennifer. 2007. Conferring with Readers. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.