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Raywillis,kirstenking,gcc2013
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Raywillis,kirstenking,gcc2013

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5th Massachusetts Green Career Conference Presentation: Water Quality Professionals

5th Massachusetts Green Career Conference Presentation: Water Quality Professionals

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  • 1. Water Quality Professionals – Enforcing the Right to Clean Water  Massachusetts Green Career  Conference October 3, 2013 Marlborough, Massachusetts Oct
  • 2.  Ray Willis, President Massachusetts Water Pollution Control Association  Kirsten King, Communications Director New England Water Works Association Co‐Presenters
  • 3. Massachusetts Water Pollution Control  Association (MWPCA)  Founded in 1965  Located at Richard Alden Training Center in Millbury  Comprised of over 800 water quality professionals  Strives to be an advocate and provide a voice for  the wastewater and stormwater sectors  Associated state association of WEF and NEWEA Overview ‐ MWPCA
  • 4. Overview ‐ NEWWA  Established in 1882  Approximately 3,000  members  Serves six New England  states   Based out of Holliston,  Mass. – a central location  for the New England states  Is a section of the American  Water Works Association
  • 5. NEWWA – Mission Statement Our mission is to promote public health, safety, quality of life, and environmental stewardship through education/training, advocacy, and outreach relating to safe drinking water and to advance the membership.
  • 6. NEWWA Water Utilities Consultants Manufacturers Regulators Environmental  Associations Academia Construction  NEWWA – Who We Serve
  • 7. Regulatory Requirements ‐ Wastewater  U.S. EPA policies/regulations requiring upgrades of existing  facilities and constructing new facilities  Phosphorus and Nitrogen Removal Industry Climate ‐ Wastewater
  • 8. Industry Climate – Drinking Water  New & Revised Regulations  Total Coliform Rule  Lead and Copper Rule  Manganese  Disinfection byproducts
  • 9.  Majority of water‐related infrastructure locally and  nationally has reached its design life and requires  replacement  Massachusetts Water Infrastructure Finance Commission  identified that $39.4 Billion will be required over the next  20 years    AWWA ’s seminal report, Buried No Longer™: Confronting  America’s Water Infrastructure Challenge (AWWA , 2012),  showed that restoring existing potable water pipe  networks as they reach the end of their useful lives and  expanding them to serve a growing U.S. population will  cost at least $1 trillion over the next 25 years Aging Infrastructure
  • 10. The True Cost of Water  Consumers do not pay for the  true cost of water  Public outreach campaigns  are working to educate public  about the need to invest in  our water and wastewater  systems  Also the Mass. Water  Infrastructure Finance  Commission and national  WIFIA (Water Infrastructure  Finance & Innovation  Authority) $0 $50 $100 $150 $200 $250 Utility Cost Comparisons Average Monthly Cost
  • 11. The Progressive Path  Water and Wastewater  Utilities are Becoming  ‘Greener’  Solar panels (Chelmsford,  Grafton, Littleton)  Wind power (MWRA)
  • 12. Career Paths in Drinking Water and Wastewater The “Original” Green Professions  Engineering  Civil, Environmental,  Chemical   Design  Facility Operations  Construction Management
  • 13. Career Paths in Drinking Water and Wastewater The “Original” Green Professions  Construction   Laborers  Equipment Operators   Supervisors  Project Management
  • 14. Career Paths in Drinking Water and Wastewater The “Original” Green Professions  Treatment Plant &  Reservoir Operations &  Management   Plant managers/supervisors  Water quality  analysts/chemists  Watershed  managers/foresters  Operators
  • 15. Career Paths in Drinking Water and Wastewater The “Original” Green Professions  Distribution System  Management  Collection/Distribution  Supervisors/Managers  Mechanics  Plumbers  Operations crews  Metering  Valves  Hydrants  Emergency crews  Maintenance crews
  • 16. Career Paths in Drinking Water and Wastewater The “Original” Green Professions  Sales  Equipment Sales  Technical Support  Field Technicians
  • 17. Cross Connection/Backflow  NEWWA certifies cross  connection control  surveyors as well as  backflow prevention device  inspectors/testers
  • 18. Additional Careers  Regulatory  Accounting/Finance  Customer Service  Public Relations  Information Technology  Lawyer
  • 19.  “Promoting Entry to Career Pathways in the Drinking Water  and Wastewater Sector,” Lowell Center for Sustainable  Production, University of Massachusetts Lowell and The  Massachusetts Workforce Alliance, May 2012  Nationally 30‐50% of current water workforce will be eligible for  retirement in the next 5 to 10 years  Average age in Massachusetts 50+ years; MWPCA member 52 years  old  Potential for 2,400 operators to retire in Massachusetts over the  next 10 years  There are 250 Municipal Drinking Water Utilities and 120 Municipal  Wastewater Utilities in Massachusetts in addition to private drinking  water and wastewater facilities  Drinking Water/Wastewater Critical  Need: Operations
  • 20. Quote from Study: “The drinking water and wastewater industry is  comprised of good but challenging jobs with  advancement potential, clear career pathways and  supervisors who support education and training for  those pathways.  Industry leaders are committed to  their employees, profession, and mission to protect  public health and the environment.” Drinking Water/Wastewater  Operations
  • 21. Drinking Water/Wastewater ‐ Operations Operator Skill Requirements:  Basic understanding of  math and science concepts  required  Mechanically inclined  Licensure requirements  Other positions available  within field that require  less skill/licensure
  • 22. Licensure Options   Municipal and Industrial Categories  Operator    Grades 1 – 4 Municipal  Grades 1 ‐ 4 Industrial  Grades 5 – 7 Combined  Collection System (voluntary) – Grades 1 ‐ 4  Laboratory (voluntary) ‐ Grades 1 – 2 Wastewater Operators
  • 23.  Schedule exam on‐line at goamp.com (3 locations in  New England)  Pass exam and submit results to NEIWPCC with fee  Issued license in one of three categories: WI – When & If Status OT – Operator in Training, employed by a facility but does not meet  educational requirements Full – Employed by a facility and meet educational requirements • Information – www.neiwpcc.org Wastewater Licensure  Process 
  • 24. Passing of the Equivalent Exam and Experience at Equivalent or  Higher‐Graded Facility  Grade 1 – One year experience; 6 month education credit   Grade 2 – Three years experience; 2 year education credit  Grade 3 – Five years experience; 3 year education credit  Grade 4 – Six years experience; 4 year education credit  Grade 5 – Six years experience; 4 year education credit  Grade 6 – Seven years of experience; 5 year education credit  Grade 7 – Eight years of experience; 5 year education credit Wastewater Licensure  Full Status Requirements
  • 25. Licensure Options  Distribution – Grades 1‐4  Treatment – Grades 1‐4 New course requirements to sit for Grades 2‐4 Full operator certification requirements vary depending on education  level and test passed: http://www.mass.gov/eea/agencies/massdep/water/drinking/educatio n‐and‐experience‐requirements‐for‐full‐operator‐c.html Drinking Water Operators
  • 26. Drinking Water/Wastewater  Operator Training  New England Water Works  Association  Certificate Program  New England Water  Environment Association  Massachusetts Water  Works Association  Massachusetts Rural Water  Association
  • 27. Student/Young Professional  Involvement  Student Poster Session at  NEWWA Annual Spring  Conference each year  YP Session/Competition at  Conference  Student Activities Committee  Young Professional  Committee  Discounted Student Member  Rate for Joint  NEWWA/NEWEA/NEAPWA  Membership
  • 28.  Municipal Drinking Water and Wastewater Facilities  Department of Public Works, Water Districts, Commissions, Sewer Districts  Private Drinking Water and Wastewater Facilities  Private operation firms, decentralized facilities, private water supplies, etc.   Industrial  Private industrial facilities, commercial facilities, etc.  Private Sector  Consulting/engineering firms, construction firms, equipment  manufacturers  Government  Federal, state, local Drinking Water/Wastewater Markets
  • 29. Current Salary Ranges  Entry Level ‐ $38,000 ‐ $42,000  Mid Level  ‐ $46,000 ‐ $52,000  Supervisor Level ‐ $74,000 ‐ $83,000 Potential for Increased Salaries  Supply vs. Demand  Sophistication of facilities now requiring skilled employees  Licensure requirements  Jobs cannot be outsourced Drinking Water/Wastewater Operator Salaries
  • 30. Industry Web sites  www.mwpca.org  www.mwwa.memberclicks.net  www.newwa.org/careercenter  www.newea.org  www.awwa.org  ‐ career center  www.wef.org – job bank Workforce Development Agencies  Career Center Lowell  Skill Works  Regional Employment Agencies/Workforce Investment Board  MassDEP  Veteran Affairs Services How Do I Find These Jobs?
  • 31. Kirsten King, Director of Communications New England Water Works Association  (508) 893‐7979, Ext. 243 kking@newwa.org Lynn Foisy, Executive Director Massachusetts Water Pollution Control Association (774) 289‐3402 mwpca2011@yahoo.com Need Help????
  • 32. Thank You – Any Questions?

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