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Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014
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Elizabethyoungbloodmasccc2014

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Presentation at 2014 Massachusetts Sustainable Communities and Campuses Conference

Presentation at 2014 Massachusetts Sustainable Communities and Campuses Conference

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  • 1. Massachuse(s  Sustainable  Communi3es  &   Campuses  Conference       Presented  by:   Elizabeth  Youngblood   Solar  Program  Manager   Massachuse(s  Clean  Energy  Center     April  17,  2014  
  • 2. 2   Outline   •  Overview  of  MassCEC  and  Market   •  Innova7ve  Community  Programs   •  Addi7onal  Op7ons  for  Communi7es  
  • 3. 3   MassCEC  Statutory  Mandate   Advance  Clean  Energy  Technology   Create  Jobs   Develop  a  Trained  Workforce   Accelerate  Deployment  of  Clean  Energy  
  • 4. 4   Core  Ac7vi7es   • Targeted  investments  in  promising  MA   companies  Investments   • Tracking  industry  trends,  iden7fying   gaps  facing  cleantech  companies  and   developing  programs  to  close  them   Innova7on  &   Industry  Support   • Innova7ve  incen7ve  programs  to   create  demand  in  the  market  for   affordable,  responsibly-­‐sited  projects   Renewable  Energy   Genera7on   • Wind  Technology  Tes7ng  Center  and   the  New  Bedford  Marine  Commerce   Terminal   Infrastructure  
  • 5. 5   MA  Clean  Energy  Economy  is  Large  &  Growing   •  11.8%  growth  since   2012   •  24%  growth  since   2011   •  5,557  clean  energy   firms   •  79,994  clean   energy  workers   (2013  Clean  Energy  Industry  Report)  
  • 6. 6   Leading  the  Clean  Energy  Charge   •  #2  in  U.S.  in  clean  energy  technology  in  U.S.  (2013  Clean   Edge)   –  #1  in  U.S.  in  clean  energy  policy  in  U.S.  (2013  Clean  Edge)   –  #1  in  U.S.  in  clean  energy  investments  (2013  Clean  Edge)   •  #1  in  energy  efficiency  in  the  U.S.  (American  Council  for  an   Energy  Efficient  Economy  2011  -­‐  2013)     •  #7  in  U.S.  in  solar  deployment  (2013  Environment  America)    
  • 7. 2006  
  • 8. 2013  
  • 9. 9   Outline   •  Overview  of  MassCEC  and  Market   •  Innova7ve  Community  Programs   •  Addi7onal  Op7ons  for  Communi7es  
  • 10. •  Pilot  Program     •  6  total  awards   Ø  3  Individual   Communi7es   Ø  3  RPAs  with  up  to   4  Communi7es   Ø  Total  of  15   Communi7es     Community  Energy  Strategies  
  • 11. 11   Community  Energy  Strategy  Goals   • Assist  municipali7es  to  iden7fy  and  implement  an   op7mal  mix  of  exis7ng  strategies  and  incen7ves  to   address  local  interests,  needs,  and  opportuni7es   for  clean  energy  development   Iden7fy   •  Provide  educa7onal  opportuni7es  to  support   Community  Energy  Strategies  planning   context,  ac7vi7es,  and  results.   Educate   •  Support  development  of  local  clean  energy   planning  engagement  and  capacity  to   promote  ongoing  ownership  and   implementa7on  of  clean  energy  goals.   Assist  
  • 12. 12   Program  Strategy   • Facilita7on  Consultant   Process  Support   • GIS  Data  development  and  Analysis   • Roodop  Solar  PV  Poten7al  Analysis  and  Map   Technical  Support   • Building  Inventory   • Roodop  Solar  Map   • Renewable  Thermal  Poten7al   • Street  Light  Analysis  (Northampton)   Data  Analysis   • Clean  Energy  Road  Map   Deliverables  
  • 13. 13   Building  Inventory  Summary  
  • 14. 14   Roodop  Solar  Map  
  • 15. 15   Renewable  Thermal  Poten7al  
  • 16. 13%  of  MA  communi.es  have  par.cipated  in  Solarize  Mass     Solarize  Mass  
  • 17. 18   Goals  of  Solarize  Mass   •  Increase  educa7on  and   awareness  through   community  outreach   •  Introduce  model  to   simplify  process   •  Reduce  installa7on  costs   •  Reduce  7me  to  contract   Equipment   Costs   “SoO”  Costs   Sales   Installa3on   State  Average   Equipment   Costs   “SoO”  Costs   Installa3on   Solarize  Mass   Drive  down  the  cost  stack  
  • 18. 19   Program  Results  to  Date   Year   Communi3es     Contracts     Signed   Avg.  Contracts  per   Community   Capacity   (kW)   Avg.  Capacity  per   Community  (kW)   2011   4  communi3es   162   40   829   207   2012   17  communi3es  (13   proposals)   803   47   5,146   302   2013  R1   10  communi3es  (9   proposals)   551   55   3,838   383   2013  R2   15  communi3es  (10   proposals)     TBD   TBD   TBD   TBD   Total   46  communi3es   1,516   9,813   -­‐See  ~10%  forfeiture  rate  in  program  (consistent  w/  rebate  market)  
  • 19. 20   Solarize  Mass  Adop7on   0   50   100   150   200   250   Number  of  Projects   Pre-­‐Solarize   During  Solarize  
  • 20. 21   Solarize  Mass  Lessons  Learned   •  2012  and  2013  Round  1:  Average  project  had  20%  savings  vs.  market   •  MassCEC  all-­‐in  costs  (administra7on,  marke7ng  funds,  technical   consultant)  was  small  percentage  of  savings   •  Program  Lessons  Learned   •  Have  a  plan  for  engaging  volunteers  and  implemen7ng  variety  of   outreach  methods  throughout  the  sign-­‐up  period  is  a  key  to  success   •  Each  community  is  different   •  Educa7on  and  awareness  are  important   •  Deadlines  work  
  • 21. 22   Outline   •  Overview  of  MassCEC  and  Market   •  Innova7ve  Community  Programs   •  Addi7onal  Op7ons  for  Communi7es  
  • 22. 23   Addi7onal  Op7ons   •  Become  a  Green  Community   •  Evaluate  permihng  processes  for  renewable   energy  projects   •  Community  Shared  Solar   •  Consider  Solarize  Mass  or  other  solar  challenge   •  Research  online  tools  and  clean  energy  planning   •  Leverage  grassroots  outreach  poten7al  
  • 23. 24   Thank  You!   Elizabeth  Youngblood   Solar  Project  Manager   Massachuseks  Clean  Energy  Center   eyoungblood@masscec.com   617-­‐315-­‐9335    

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