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Dan Cook 2013 masccc

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Urban Power USA

Urban Power USA

Published in: Business, Technology

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  • 1. Next  Genera*on  Ver*cal  Axis  “Drag”  Style  Wind  Turbines  Getting  it  Right!  Proper  Siting  of  Wind  Turbines  &    Selection  of  the  Right  Wind  Turbine  Technology  Presenta(on  by:  Daniel  Cook,  Vice  President  Urban  Power  USA  3rd MA Sustainability Communities Conference 2nd MA Sustainability Campuses Conference
  • 2. Massachuse>s  Renewable  Energy  Goals  198 48
  • 3. Massachuse>s  Wind  Energy  Profile  Next GenerationVertical Axis Drag StyleWind Energy Opportunities
  • 4. Small  Wind  Systems   Small-­‐scale  wind  power  systems  have  the  capacity  to  produce  up  to  100  kW  of  electrical  power  DarrieusVAWT Next GenerationDrag StyleVAWT
  • 5. Tradi(onal  “LiI”  Style    Horizontal  Axis  Wind  Turbines   High  Efficiency   Require  Laminar  Flow  (smooth)  Wind   Work  well  in  wind  speeds  between  18-­‐35  mph   Generates  torque  from  high  rotor  speeds   Generator  located  on  turbine   Lots  of  moving  parts   Require  taller  tower  to                                                                                        eliminate  turbulent  air   Feather  or  shut  down  when                                                                                                  winds  above  35  mph  
  • 6. Tradi(onal  “LiI”  Style    Ver(cal  Axis  Wind  Turbines   High  Efficiency   Require  Laminar  Flow  (smooth)  Wind   Work  well  in  wind  speeds  between  18–35  mph   Generator  repairs  require  turbine  disassembly   Generates  torque  from  high  rotor  speed   Shut  down  when  wind  speed  greater  than  35  mph   Require  taller  tower  to  eliminate  turbulent  air   Generally  Don’t  operate  at  low  wind  speeds  
  • 7. “LiI”  Style    Wind  Turbine   Wind turbine blade requires smooth laminar flowwind to create lift for the turbine to spin effectivelyand fast.   Lift type wind turbines don’t become efficient untilthe wind is approximately 18 mph
  • 8. Savonius  Ver(cal  Axis  Drag  Style  Wind  Turbine    Because of the curvature, the scoops experience less dragwhen moving against the wind than when moving with thewind. The differential drag causes the Savonius turbine tospin.   There is resistance on the back side of the scoop resultingin lower efficiencies than traditional wind turbines. Resistance Impulse Force
  • 9. Next  Genera*on    Ver(cal  Axis  “Drag”  Style    Wind  Turbines    Significant increase in electrical production   Massachusetts Manufacturer   Work in turbulent wind and laminar flow wind   Work on Flat roof tops  Requires ≥30% larger sweep area
  • 10. Next  Genera*on    Ver(cal  Axis  “Drag”  Style    Wind  Turbines   Use  wind  loading  like  a  sail  to  create  force   Produces  torque  by  spinning  a  large  mass  slowly   Produce  more  electricity  at  lower  wind  speeds  6-­‐18  mph,  less  at  18-­‐35  mph  and  more  at  high  wind  speeds  >  35  mph   Work  in  turbulent  wind   Don’t  require  tall  towers   Can  be  Roof  Mounted   Few  moving  parts   Bird  &  bat  friendly  
  • 11. Urban  Power  Unique  Patented  Wind  Turbine  Design  
  • 12.  5.0  KW    Wind  Turbine  Tower  Installa(on  
  • 13. Urban  Power  5.0  KW  Wind  Turbines  
  • 14. Urban  Power  5.0  KW  Wind  Turbines  
  • 15.  5.0  KW    Wind  Turbine  
  • 16. Capacity  Factor  The  ra*o  of  an  energy  produc*on  system’s  actual  output  over  *me  to  it  poten*al  output  Solar PV: 13% - 15% Wind: 20% - 40% Note: Wind produces approximately 2X moreelectricity than Solar PV per KW whenproperly sited and equipment properly selected
  • 17. Small  Wind  Turbines:    Site  Tes(ng    Wind  Speed  &  Air  Flow   Anemometer Testing  Laminar Flow (smooth) Wind  Turbulent Wind (caused by buildings, trees andother nearby obstructions)
  • 18. Small  Wind  Turbines:    Site  Selec(on    “lift” style wind turbines should be 2X the height ofobstructions & 20X the distance from obstructions
  • 19. Examples  of  Turbulent  Wind  
  • 20. Small  Wind  Turbines:    Product  Selec(on   Does the wind turbine work in turbulent wind?(are their buildings trees or other obstructionsnearby?)  Does wind turbine require smooth laminar flowwind away from any obstructions?  Are predominant winds between 18 - 35 mph?  Are predominant winds below 18 mph and/orabove 35 mph?
  • 21. Small  Wind  Turbines:    Performance   Important that wind manufacturers and winddevelopers apply their wind turbines to theoptimal wind location (wind speed & wind type –laminar and/or turbulent wind) to ensure optimalcapacity factor/performance so customerexpectations are met.  Lift type wind turbines should NOT be placed inturbulent wind locations such as on or nearbuildings, near trees and other obstructions thatcan cause turbulence.
  • 22. Wind  Energy  Assessments   Consulting  a  wind  map,  obtaining  previously  measured  data     Taking  your  own  measurements  with  anemometer   Hire  consultant  to  test  wind  speed  1  year  of  data,  or   Use  1-­‐  2  months  anemometer  data  to  do  correlation  study  
  • 23. Small  Wind  Turbines:  Monitoring   Wind turbines should be monitored in real time,and record daily, weekly, monthly, annual andhistoric wind energy production relative to actualwind speeds.
  • 24. Small  Wind  Turbines:    Tradi(onal  Horizontal  Axis  Wind  Turbine    are  properly  applied  in  Laminar  Flow  Winds  only!!!  Op*mum  performance  between  18  mph  –  42  mph  
  • 25. Small  Wind  Turbines:    Poor  Applica(ons  “Lift” Style Horizontal &Vertical Axis WindTurbines in theTurbulent UrbanEnvironment ofBoston (5 wind turbines withcombined 15.6 KWcapacity = 15,583 kWhsin 3 years 7 months) 15.6KW - 15,583 kWhs in 43 mos – ave. 362 kWhs /mo
  • 26. Small  Wind  Turbines:    Turbulent  Wind  Properly  Applied  Next Generation“Drag” Style Wind Turbines in aTurbulent Environment (1.8 KW capacity = 3,433kWhs in 8 month –Easthampton, MA windspeed less than Boston) 18,452 kWh in3 years 7 months
  • 27. Small  Wind  Turbines:    Summary    Get it Right! Site the RightWind EnergyTechnology in the RightWind Location   Lift Style Horizontal & Vertical Axis Wind Turbines inLaminar Flow Wind only with speeds between 18 mph – ±42 mph   Traditional Vertical Axis Drag Style Wind Turbines inTurbulent and/or Laminar Flow Wind ±8 mph – 42 mph   Next Generation Vertical Axis Drag Style Wind Turbinesin Turbulent and/or Laminar Flow Wind ±8 mph – ±70 mph
  • 28. Ques(ons  
  • 29. Thank  You  Dan  Cook,  Vice  President  www.urbanpowerusa.com  978-­‐266-­‐1900  

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