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French Revolution Journal Entries (Karina Zeng)

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  • June 20 th , 1789: Tennis Court Oath Camille Roux ’s Story: As I managed my tiny clothes shop in the run-down village, I heard the murmuring of civilians outside. They must ’ve been talking about the formation of Tennis Court Oath . I glanced towards a rusty yet beautiful locket: a gift from my now deceased husband. My expression turned remorseful. With the current famine, many of my fellow peasants have starved to death , including my husband. I have two children, Alexandre and Angelina, who I would protect with my life. I can’t afford to lose any other family member from this hunger. But now, we are unable to buy enough food with the recent food shortage . Civilians were starving, but the nobles definitely weren’t . I scowled in anger at the thought of the nobles. I find it very unfair that we have to work all the time, while we get very little pay and food for it . Most of the food goes to the nobles and the royal family . I ’m sick and tired of the nobles acting like they’re better than us commoners . The Third Estate makes up the bulk of the population , but we don’t get a fair say in anything. Lower class citizens like my family are starving out here, and we still get taxed more than the nobles . Some of the clergies don’t get taxed at all! Earlier today, the King held a meeting to discuss reforming the economy of France. Since the votes on both sides were even, the meeting didn ’t have a final conclusion. I heard the Third Estate deputies were fed up, and exited the meeting hall to create their own National Assembly , to speak against the King . Then, King Louis XVI locked them out of the meeting hall ! If the King thinks that's all it takes to stop the voices of the Third Estate, then he is foolish. The new National Assembly just went behind his back and met in a tennis court. There, they created the Tennis Court Oath, which declares the Third Estate to never break up and to meet until the establishment of the Constitution of France . Apparently, a few nobles also joined the National Assembly to start an uprising against the King . I guess they aren’t all stuck up and self-absorbed. With the new National Assembly, I believe peasants can finally have some power in France. Hopefully, the National Assembly can make a change within the rule of the government. I believe the Tennis Court Oath represents a new beginning with the Third Estate; that we would stay with each other to go against the harsh conditions King Louis forced us to live with. As a young, 27-year-old female shopkeeper, I can ’t do much to help now, but when the time comes, I will do anything to protect my kids from suffering under the rule of the monarch. Will we ever be free from hunger and starvation? Would the peasants really revolt in order to take down the King? Can the National Assembly save us from continuing to live like this? I think we need to start something; anything that would get the attention of the King. Then, we might be able to get back for all the innocent people that were killed in starvation. (534 words)
  • July 14 th , 1789: Storming Of The Bastille Camille Roux ’s Story: Hooray! Today we revolted against the government ! The storming of the Bastille was legendary! I was slightly saddened that I couldn ’t participate in the rebellion, but I had to stay and take care of Alexandre and Angelina at the shop. However, I still supported my fellow civilians in the attack. Many of my neighboring storekeepers were part of the mob, charging to the Bastille and stealing ammunition . They said there were several guards at the prison, but our attacking crowd greatly outnumbered them . Civilians besieged the prison, but were blocked from entering by a large gate. The peasants demanded the gates of the prison to be opened, but the Bastille governor, Marquis de Launay , refused . Of course, the peasants didn ’t back down. They demanded again and again until the governor surrendered , then attacked and killed every guard and soldier, including Marquis de Launay . Even if he was an official, we no longer cared about authority. We could take control with our own hands! Just a few hours earlier, my fellow peasants paraded around the streets with hundreds of guards ’ heads on pikes ! I looked out of my shop window, laughing at the sight of bloody and mutilated heads. I fully believe the soldiers of the King deserve this kind of treatment. Imagine the shame and humiliation of having your head on a stick! It serves them right. Storming the Bastille was a great idea for a revolt. I admire the militia members that organized the revolt . The aim was to scare the King while obtaining weapons at the same time . Also, we managed to take over an important role in the government: control. Isn ’t a prison supposed to be guarded and controlled? Ha! The civilians easily brought it down. The government lost its control on the Bastille. I believe the revolt served its purpose: to send a message to King Louis XVI . We don ’t want any more starvation and pain. We don’t want any more injustice . We want change. I wish all the citizens of France, both nobles and commoners, could live equally among each other. If only there was no monarch to control us all… I hope our attack at the Bastille terrified the King. I hope he sees it to be more than just a revolt; it is the start of a revolution . I now have great confidence in the Third Estate and National Assembly. If we could easily revolt like this, then a revolution against the monarch should also be easy! Who knows? Maybe we can march straight to Versailles and capture King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette and end the monarch for good! Even though us peasants have small jobs and little money, together we can start something extraordinary for the better of France. (458 Words)
  • August 10 th , 1792: Overthrow Of The Monarchy Camille Roux ’s Story: It ’s been four very long years since the start of the revolution. So much has changed; I have changed. I joined the Robespierre and the Jacobins in striving to rid the monarch . And we finally succeeded . I believe King Louis XVI was a weak leader who easily swayed with his opinions. He couldn ’t control France when it needed the leadership the most. France was in great debt from wars , which resulted in greater taxes for peasants , which resulted in peasants rebelling . We did have a good reason for hating the King: heavy taxes, no profit, and especially, no food. After us revolutionaries forced King Louis and Marie Antoinette to live in Paris , he knew he had to regain his authority. During the war with Austria and Prussia , he and Marie Antoinette pretended to side with France, but they were really siding with Austria . Imagine, and King double-crossing against his own country! Of course we were felt betrayed! Just earlier today, when I found out he was a traitor and a liar , I felt anger and abhorrence for the King. Outraged, I joined my fellow 20,000 revolutionaries in attacking the Palace , where the royals were staying. I remember crying out words of hatred towards the royals. It was just like the women ’s march and attack back in 1789 . “I want an arm!” “I want a leg!” However, this revolt was different. We actually overthrew the King! The weak royals fled the palace, but the Assembly found them and imprisoned King Louis and Marie Antoinette at last. We finally got what we wanted: The abolishment of the monarch . The situation was almost surreal. I screamed and cheered and rejoiced at the time, but now, as I rethink the situation, I can only think of one thing: What is going to happen next? The Assembly renamed itself the National Convention , and established a republic for France . The reason I joined the assault was to protect my children from the rule of the King. Now that he is gone, I hope to go back to my usual life as a shopkeeper. I really hope a republic could help improve the living conditions of France, especially for people of the Third Estate. Would Angelina and Alexandre – now 10 and 11 respectively – live a better life now that the monarchy is gone? Will we live up to our cries of “liberty, equality, fraternity”? Everything horrible the monarch has done to us, the republic will change. I am sure of it. (414 Words)
  • January 21 st , 1793: King Louis XVI ’s Death On Guillotine Camille Roux ’s Story: The backstabbing, uncaring, traitorous King finally got what he deserved! On this day, January 21 st of 1793, King Louis XVI was to be killed by the guillotine . After the monarch was abolished and the royals were imprisoned , Robespierre , one of the leaders of the National Convention, declared King Louis guilty for high treason , and scheduled his execution . Oh, how the mighty have fallen. I joined many other revolutionaries in watching the execution of the King. Of course, I left Alexandre and Angelina in the shop, for they were too young to watch the beheading of a person, even if it was the King. As I watched the King ’s condemnation, I believed the King was lessened to someone no better than a peasant. The guillotine was meant to kill equally , peasant and King the same. Equality. It was something King Louis never gave us. During the execution, I heard King Louis ’s last words through the beating of the drums . “ I die innocent of all crimes laid to my charge… ” I grew angrier and angrier at each word. How dare he think he was innocent?! He betrayed all of France, by siding with Austria when we were starving and heavily in debt . Does he not care for the wellbeing of his citizens? Of course not, he was a selfish noble. Just as I was lost in my thoughts, I heard the swish of the blade coming down to behead the King . At first, all was silent . Then, a young guard, who was no older than 20, seized King Louis ’ head at gestured towards the masses . Even though I hate the King with a passion, I grew slightly discontent at the expressions of my fellow citizens. Some eyed the bloody head with such sadistic looks that I had to glance away. A tumultuous cry of victory roused from the crowd , cheering for the forever fallen King. I too, joined the rejoicing. Then, I heard several cries of “Long live the Republic!” and I shuddered in excitement. Several cries multiplied to thousands ; soon everyone was screaming: “Long live the Republic”. I hope the National Convention would improve France’s economy drastically, and make up for all wrongdoings of the monarch. However, I suddenly remembered a critical factor. With the King gone, how would the war with Austria and Prussia turn out? After all, King Louis XVI did side with the opponent … He should ’ve ended the war before it even started. Now, other kingdoms might join Austria and Prussia in the war against us, since our old leader has been killed. Other revolutionaries around me screamed for joy along with the cheers for the republic. Some were crying, singing, dancing; all forms of triumph. But I could only stand here with my gut feeling: that this was only the first in the series of bloodshed and terror that would destroy France. (475 Words)
  • July 28th, 1794: The Reign Of Terror Camille Roux ’s Story: I sit quietly at my bedside, watching the moon cast an eerie glow onto the dusty floor. The gloomy, silent nighttime is the best to review my thoughts. Thoughts about the changes in our country. I feel like I am emotionally caught between two sides of a war. One side, I am supporting Robespierre and the National Convention in improving France . But so far, nothing great has happened. France is still in debt from wars, and prices are continually rising . Other kingdoms in Europe have allied with Austria and Prussia , so we must protect our country for foreign enemies . More money is used for war; less is given for food . Famine has occurred around the country ; how is it different than when King Louis XVI ruled?! I glance solemnly towards two sleeping figures, Angelina and Alexandre. Both of them were growing up beautifully, and maturing quickly. All I want is a good life for them; what else does a mother want? In spite of the food shortages, I continue to root for the republic, in hopes of a better future for my children. On the other hand, I don't want to keep living in a state of fear. Robespierre may be trying to equalize France , but beheading anyone who opposes him is not the best way for leadership. At least the horrible King is gone, right? Robespierre and other members of the Committee of Public Safety , who are part of the National Convention, wanted a revolutionary dictatorship . I am uneducated in all of these political affairs, but isn ’t establishing a dictatorship giving us civilians less control over France? I am confused to where France is heading. I know I must be careful in expressing my suspicions, for anyone who doubts the revolution will be convicted to the guillotine. Robespierre , being the cautious man he is, sentenced 30,000 people to the guillotine . The device has killed so many in France, that it is now called the National Razor . Some men who only muttered words against the revolution have been killed , and I hope to keep my family and myself safe. After all, I quit being part of the Jacobins , which could be seen as a defying act. During the rule of the Committee of Public Safety, many peasants feel powerful, because they have some control over the nobles . The upper-class citizens were the ones in great fear, for anyone could be captured and killed . The execution of King Louis has started the era of killing and horror, called the Reign Of Terror . Robespierre simply removed whoever went against him in the war, friend and foe alike. Just to further prove my opinion, even Robespierre himself was sentenced to the guillotine recently! And by other Jacobins , too! Betrayal seems to be quite common among leaders. Now that one of the key leaders was removed from the Committee, how will France survive through all the problems? When will the Reign of Terror end? Massive bloodshed has occurred in France , and no one is safe. (501 Words)
  • Transcript

    • 1. By Karina ZengBy Karina Zeng
    • 2. IntroductionHave you ever wondered what life was like during the FrenchRevolution? Well, look no further! Camille Roux is a 27 yearold shopkeeper who will share her story with us. She is notvery big on making change, but still supports therevolutionaries on their task. Her largest goal in life is tocreate a better and more comfortable life for her two kids,Alexandre and Angelina.
    • 3. June 20th, 1789:Tennis Court OathMembers of the Third Estatecreating the Tennis Court Oath.
    • 4. Camille Roux’s Story:As I managed my tiny clothes shop in the run-down village, I heardthe murmuring of civilians outside. They must’ve been talking aboutthe formation of Tennis Court Oath. I glanced towards a rusty yetbeautiful locket: a gift from my now deceased husband. Myexpression turned remorseful. With the current famine, many of myfellow peasants have starved to death, including my husband. I havetwo children, Alexandre and Angelina, who I would protect with mylife. I can’t afford to lose any other family member from this hunger.But now, we are unable to buy enough food with the recent foodshortage. Civilians were starving, but the nobles definitely weren’t. Iscowled in anger at the thought of the nobles. I find it very unfair thatwe have to work all the time, while we get very little pay and food forit. Most of the food goes to the nobles and the royal family.I’m sick and tired of the nobles acting like they’re better than uscommoners. The Third Estate makes up the bulk of thepopulation, but we don’t get a fair say in anything. Lower classcitizens like my family are starving out here, and we still get taxedmore than the nobles. Some of the clergies don’t get taxed at all!
    • 5. Earlier today, the King held a meeting to discuss reforming theeconomy of France. Since the votes on both sides were even, themeeting didn’t have a final conclusion. I heard the Third Estatedeputies were fed up, and exited the meeting hall to create their ownNational Assembly, to speak against the King. Then, King LouisXVI locked them out of the meeting hall! If the King thinks thats all ittakes to stop the voices of the Third Estate, then he is foolish. Thenew National Assembly just went behind his back and met in atennis court. There, they created the Tennis Court Oath, whichdeclares the Third Estate to never break up and to meet until theestablishment of the Constitution of France. Apparently, a fewnobles also joined the National Assembly to start an uprising againstthe King. I guess they aren’t all stuck up and self-absorbed.
    • 6. With the new National Assembly, I believe peasants can finally havesome power in France. Hopefully, the National Assembly can makea change within the rule of the government. I believe the TennisCourt Oath represents a new beginning with the Third Estate; thatwe would stay with each other to go against the harsh conditionsKing Louis forced us to live with. As a young, 27-year-old femaleshopkeeper, I can’t do much to help now, but when the time comes,I will do anything to protect my kids from suffering under the rule ofthe monarch.Will we ever be free from hunger and starvation? Would thepeasants really revolt in order to take down the King? Can theNational Assembly save us from continuing to live like this?I think we need to start something; anything that would get theattention of the King. Then, we might be able to get back for all theinnocent people that were killed in starvation.(534 words)
    • 7. July 14th, 1789:Storming Of The BastilleMy fellow civilians attacking the Bastille.
    • 8. Camille Roux’s Story:Hooray! Today we revolted against the government! The stormingof the Bastille was legendary! I was slightly saddened that Icouldn’t participate in the rebellion, but I had to stay and take care ofAlexandre and Angelina at the shop. However, I still supported myfellow civilians in the attack. Many of my neighboring storekeeperswere part of the mob, charging to the Bastille and stealingammunition.They said there were several guards at the prison, but our attackingcrowd greatly outnumbered them. Civilians besieged the prison, butwere blocked from entering by a large gate. The peasantsdemanded the gates of the prison to be opened, but the Bastillegovernor, Marquis de Launay, refused. Of course, the peasantsdidn’t back down. They demanded again and again until thegovernor surrendered, then attacked and killed every guard andsoldier, including Marquis de Launay. Even if he was an official, weno longer cared about authority. We could take control with our ownhands!
    • 9. Just a few hours earlier, my fellow peasants paraded around thestreets with hundreds of guards’ heads on pikes! I looked out of myshop window, laughing at the sight of bloody and mutilated heads. Ifully believe the soldiers of the King deserve this kind of treatment.Imagine the shame and humiliation of having your head on a stick! Itserves them right.Storming the Bastille was a great idea for a revolt. I admire themilitia members that organized the revolt. The aim was to scare theKing while obtaining weapons at the same time. Also, we managedto take over an important role in the government: control. Isn’t aprison supposed to be guarded and controlled? Ha! The civilianseasily brought it down. The government lost its control on theBastille.I believe the revolt served its purpose: to send a message to KingLouis XVI. We don’t want any more starvation and pain. We don’twant any more injustice. We want change.
    • 10. I wish all the citizens of France, both nobles and commoners, couldlive equally among each other. If only there was no monarch tocontrol us all…I hope our attack at the Bastille terrified the King. I hope he sees it tobe more than just a revolt; it is the start of a revolution.I now have great confidence in the Third Estate and NationalAssembly. If we could easily revolt like this, then a revolution againstthe monarch should also be easy! Who knows? Maybe we canmarch straight to Versailles and capture King Louis XVI and MarieAntoinette and end the monarch for good! Even though us peasantshave small jobs and little money, together we can start somethingextraordinary for the better of France.(458 Words)
    • 11. August 10th, 1792:Overthrowing TheMonarchyRevolutionaries, including myself,storming to the Palace.
    • 12. Camille Roux’s StoryIt’s been four very long years since the start of the revolution. Somuch has changed; I have changed. I joined the Robespierre andthe Jacobins in striving to rid the monarch. And we finallysucceeded.I believe King Louis XVI was a weak leader who easily swayedwith his opinions. He couldn’t control France when it needed theleadership the most. France was in great debt from wars, whichresulted in greater taxes for peasants, which resulted in peasantsrebelling. We did have a good reason for hating the King: heavytaxes, no profit, and especially, no food.After us revolutionaries forced King Louis and Marie Antoinette tolive in Paris, he knew he had to regain his authority. During the warwith Austria and Prussia, he and Marie Antoinette pretended to sidewith France, but they were really siding with Austria. Imagine, andKing double-crossing against his own country! Of course we were feltbetrayed!
    • 13. Just earlier today, when I found out he was a traitor and a liar, I feltanger and abhorrence for the King. Outraged, I joined my fellow20,000 revolutionaries in attacking the Palace, where the royalswere staying. I remember crying out words of hatred towards theroyals. It was just like the women’s march and attack back in 1789.“I want an arm!” “I want a leg!” However, this revolt was different.We actually overthrew the King!The weak royals fled the palace, but the Assembly found them andimprisoned King Louis and Marie Antoinette at last. We finally gotwhat we wanted: The abolishment of the monarch.The situation was almost surreal. I screamed and cheered andrejoiced at the time, but now, as I rethink the situation, I can onlythink of one thing: What is going to happen next?
    • 14. The Assembly renamed itself the National Convention, and establisheda republic for France. The reason I joined the assault was to protect mychildren from the rule of the King. Now that he is gone, I hope to go back tomy usual life as a shopkeeper.I really hope a republic could help improve the living conditions of France,especially for people of the Third Estate. Would Angelina and Alexandre –now 10 and 11 respectively – live a better life now that the monarchy isgone? Will we live up to our cries of “liberty, equality, fraternity”?Everything horrible the monarch has done to us, the republic will change. Iam sure of it.(414 Words)
    • 15. January 21st, 1793:Death Of King Louis XVIMe, in the crowd, cheering King Louis’ death.
    • 16. Camille Roux’s Story:The backstabbing, uncaring, traitorous King finally got what hedeserved! On this day, January 21stof 1793, King Louis XVI wasto be killed by the guillotine. After the monarch was abolished andthe royals were imprisoned, Robespierre, one of the leaders of theNational Convention, declared King Louis guilty for high treason,and scheduled his execution. Oh, how the mighty have fallen.I joined many other revolutionaries in watching the execution ofthe King. Of course, I left Alexandre and Angelina in the shop, forthey were too young to watch the beheading of a person, even if itwas the King.As I watched the King’s condemnation, I believed the King waslessened to someone no better than a peasant. The guillotine wasmeant to kill equally, peasant and King the same. Equality. It wassomething King Louis never gave us.
    • 17. During the execution, I heard King Louis’s last words through thebeating of the drums. “I die innocent of all crimes laid to my charge…” Igrew angrier and angrier at each word. How dare he think he wasinnocent?! He betrayed all of France, by siding with Austria when wewere starving and heavily in debt. Does he not care for the wellbeingof his citizens? Of course not, he was a selfish noble.Just as I was lost in my thoughts, I heard the swish of the bladecoming down to behead the King. At first, all was silent. Then, ayoung guard, who was no older than 20, seized King Louis’ head atgestured towards the masses. Even though I hate the King with apassion, I grew slightly discontent at the expressions of my fellowcitizens. Some eyed the bloody head with such sadistic looks that Ihad to glance away.A tumultuous cry of victory roused from the crowd, cheering for theforever fallen King. I too, joined the rejoicing. Then, I heard severalcries of “Long live the Republic!” and I shuddered in excitement.Several cries multiplied to thousands; soon everyone wasscreaming: “Long live the Republic”. I hope the National Conventionwould improve France’s economy drastically, and make up for allwrongdoings of the monarch.
    • 18. However, I suddenly remembered a critical factor. With the Kinggone, how would the war with Austria and Prussia turn out? After all,King Louis XVI did side with the opponent… He should’ve ended thewar before it even started. Now, other kingdoms might join Austriaand Prussia in the war against us, since our old leader has beenkilled.Other revolutionaries around me screamed for joy along with thecheers for the republic. Some were crying, singing, dancing; allforms of triumph.But I could only stand here with my gut feeling: that this was only thefirst in the series of bloodshed and terror that would destroy France.(475 Words)
    • 19. July 28th, 1794:The Reign Of TerrorMe and my children (at the right).I will do anything to keep them safe.
    • 20. Camille Roux’s Story:I sit quietly at my bedside, watching the moon cast an eerie glowonto the dusty floor. The gloomy, silent nighttime is the best toreview my thoughts. Thoughts about the changes in our country.I feel like I am emotionally caught between two sides of a war. Oneside, I am supporting Robespierre and the National Conventionin improving France. But so far, nothing great has happened. Franceis still in debt from wars, and prices are continually rising. Otherkingdoms in Europe have allied with Austria and Prussia, so wemust protect our country for foreign enemies. More money is usedfor war; less is given for food. Famine has occurred around thecountry; how is it different than when King Louis XVI ruled?!I glance solemnly towards two sleeping figures, Angelina andAlexandre. Both of them were growing up beautifully, and maturingquickly. All I want is a good life for them; what else does a motherwant? In spite of the food shortages, I continue to root for therepublic, in hopes of a better future for my children.
    • 21. On the other hand, I dont want to keep living in a state of fear.Robespierre may be trying to equalize France, but beheadinganyone who opposes him is not the best way for leadership. At leastthe horrible King is gone, right?Robespierre and other members of the Committee of PublicSafety, who are part of the National Convention, wanted arevolutionary dictatorship. I am uneducated in all of these politicalaffairs, but isn’t establishing a dictatorship giving us civilians lesscontrol over France? I am confused to where France is heading.I know I must be careful in expressing my suspicions, for anyonewho doubts the revolution will be convicted to the guillotine.Robespierre, being the cautious man he is, sentenced 30,000people to the guillotine. The device has killed so many in France,that it is now called the National Razor. Some men who onlymuttered words against the revolution have been killed, and I hopeto keep my family and myself safe. After all, I quit being part of theJacobins, which could be seen as a defying act.
    • 22. During the rule of the Committee of Public Safety, many peasantsfeel powerful, because they have some control over the nobles. Theupper-class citizens were the ones in great fear, for anyone could becaptured and killed. The execution of King Louis has started the eraof killing and horror, called the Reign Of Terror. Robespierresimply removed whoever went against him in the war, friend and foealike.Just to further prove my opinion, even Robespierre himself wassentenced to the guillotine recently! And by other Jacobins, too!Betrayal seems to be quite common among leaders.Now that one of the key leaders was removed from the Committee,how will France survive through all the problems? When will theReign of Terror end? Massive bloodshed has occurred in France,and no one is safe.(501 Words)
    • 23. ConclusionThe French Revolution had a great effect on France and the rest of theworld. First, France abolished the monarchy, with led to forming smallergroups of constitutions. Also, it led to the rise of Napoleon, who defeatedmany opposing countries in the war. Many Frenchmen were killed during theRevolution because of the wars. The French Revolution took down the King,but Napoleon ended up establishing an absolute monarch anyways.The nobles and clergies lost their power during the Revolution, but eventuallyregain some of their power, but not very much. Even though therevolutionaries worked hard to rid the monarch, France still restored themonarchy in later years. The French Revolution enlightened people withknowledge they didn’t have before.Now, people don’t use the guillotines to execute, and countries don’t havehuge revolutions anymore. France is no longer ruled by a King, and citizensare given enough food to live.
    • 24. Citations• "The Tennis Court Oath." ThinkQuest. Oracle Foundation, n.d. Web. 14 May2013.• Plain, Nancy. ""Long Live the Nation!"" Louis XVI, Marie-Antoinette, andthe French Revolution. New York: Benchmark, 2002. 28-29. Print.• "Storming of the Bastille." ThinkQuest. Oracle Foundation, n.d. Web. 14 May2013.• Crashcourse. "The French Revolution: Crash Course World History #29."YouTube. YouTube, 10 Aug. 2012. Web. 14 May 2013.• "The Trial and Execution of Louis XVI." ThinkQuest. Oracle Foundation, n.d.Web. 14 May 2013.• "The Execution of Louis XVI, 1793." The Execution of Louis XVI, 1793. IbsCommunications, Inc., 1999. Web. 14 May 2013.• "Roles of Women in the French Revolution." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation,14 May 2013. Web. 14 May 2013.• "The Committee of Public Safety." ThinkQuest. Oracle Foundation, n.d. Web.14 May 2013.• "The Reign Of Terror." The Reign Of Terror - HistoryWiz French Revolution.HistoryWiz, n.d. Web. 14 May 2013.