Alliance program overview june 2012

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Alliance program overview june 2012

  1. 1. Mission StatementFederation’s Alliance for Jewish Education serves as thecommunity’s central address for Jewish education andidentity development, planning and advocacy.Its mission is to ensure that the community provides thehighest quality Jewish education and identity formationservices to the largest possible number of people throughouttheir lives.
  2. 2. Alliance for Jewish Education and Service Areas FedEd Adult Jewish Education Opening the Jewish Doors Total Alliance BudgetExperiencesfor Families Alliance Special Needs 2012-2013: $2,271,880 for Jewish Education Direct Service: Students, Teachers, Families: Education 9,000 people Policy, Planning Educational and Services Innovation for Change
  3. 3. Federation Allocation to Alliance for Jewish Education | 2012-2013 $ Millions1.4 1.3 1.29 1.24 1.24 1.21 1.16 0.98 0.97 0.952004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
  4. 4. Alliance for Jewish Education Budget | 2012-2013 | $2,271,880 REVENUE Contributions Campaign & $136,980 6% Other Allocations Tuition/ $947,500Program Fees 42%$321,550 14%Millennium Funds $575,642 Other Grants 25% & Income $290,208 13%
  5. 5. Listing of Endowment Income Sources Anita Naftaly Fund $ 2,200 Barron Millennium Fund $ 45,000 Berkowitz Fund $ 29,150 Berman Millennium Fund $109,292 Endowment Revenue $ 82,500 Hermelin Davidson Fund $286,750 Schulman Millennium Fund $ 10,750 Total $575,642
  6. 6. Alliance for Jewish Education Budget | 2012-2013 | $2,271,880 BY DEPARTMENT Special Projects, $143, 0 Administration 0 100 6% 0% (Fundraising, Offic 0% e, Compensation & Benefits) $361,200 16% FamilyEducation, $3 92,600 17% Special Education, $3 26,950 15% School Adult Education Education $569,025, 25% $479,005 21%
  7. 7. Special Needs Jewish Education - Service Overview• Opening the Doors 980 students• Doors to the Future 23 students• Efshar Circle 20 students• Madrichim Leadership Institute 20 teens• February Jewish Disability Month 800 participants• Anita Naftaly Family Circle Conference 320 participants• Day School Conference 230 teachersProgram Budget: $326,950Direct Service (students, teachers, adults ): 2,400
  8. 8. Adult Jewish Education – Service Overview• FedEd 1,600 registrants (900 individuals)• Florence Melton Adult Mini-school 128 students• Sh’ma Detroit Learning Together 1,500 participants• Co-sponsored Programs 1,500 participantsProgram Budget: $479,005Direct Service: 2,000 adult learners
  9. 9. School Education – Service Overview• Policy and Planning with Education Division• Professional Development Nirim Teacher Training 150 participants Day School Conference 230 Early Childhood Conference 240 Moreh L’Morim Conference 150• CSI2- Congregational School Improvement Congregations 9 Teachers 140 Lay leaders 175 Students 3,150 Hebrew Immersion 438Program Budget $569,025Direct Service: 6,556 students, 450 teachers
  10. 10. Jewish Family Education – Service Overview Jewish Family Educators 7 educators, 7,828 families Berman Jewish Family Education Grants $25,000 Community Jewish Family Education Programs 1,700 children & parents PJ Library 1,200 families (400 on waiting list)Program Budget: $392,600Direct Service: 8,000 families
  11. 11. Special Programs Congregational School Tuition Assistance Jewish Youth Professional Training Teacher Awards David Hermelin Scholarship Award BackStage Pass Witness Theater
  12. 12. Thoughts from “Conversations” Program• It’s time to reinvent Jewish education. That isn’t because Jewish education today is bad; it’s because it can be much, much better than it is. It’s a bit like Jewish education today is using a Walkman, while the world is listening to iPods. The music is playing, but it’s a lot more cumbersome and limited than it needs to be. (Jonathan Woocher, JESNAs Chief Ideas Officer and Director, Lippman Kanfer Institute: An Action-Oriented Think Tank for Innovation in Jewish Learning and Engagement )• There is a need for positive disruptions – creative disruptions. There is a dramatic need for innovation. We need to innovate or else. (David Bryfman, Director of the New Center for Collaborative Leadership at The Jewish Education Project)
  13. 13. Thoughts from “Conversations” Program• Express Innovation – Just pick something and go out and do it! (Cyd Weissman, Director, Innovation in Congregational Learning for Greater New York, for The Jewish Education Project )• Though change is risky, in today’s change environment it will be riskier to stay the same. We are currently at a tipping point. It will become harder and harder for organizations who stay the same now, to change later. (Lisa Colton, CEO Darim Online)
  14. 14. Jewish Education Challenges and/or Opportunities  Radically changing Jewish world  Digital and social media  Student enrollment  Membership and definitions of community  Funding of Jewish education

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