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Designing Next Generation Conference Education Sessions
 

Designing Next Generation Conference Education Sessions

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In the digital age, people are learning in new ways that are both communal and autonomous. They contribute to Wikipedia, comment on blogs and teach themselves programming. They follow links and ...

In the digital age, people are learning in new ways that are both communal and autonomous. They contribute to Wikipedia, comment on blogs and teach themselves programming. They follow links and discuss issues in online chats. All of these acts are collaborative and democratic, and all occur amid a worldwide community of voices.

So how does this affect the traditional conference or event? What about the typical lecture presentation with a sage on the stage and a passive listening audience?

After attending this session, participants will be able to:

1. Identify sixprinciples of designing next generation conference education sessions.
2. Discover new ways to integrate and structure horizontal, collaborative, networked learning opportunities in your conference or event.
3. Compare and contrast how room environments and traditional setups affect learning.

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  • What is education? Is there a difference between education and information? Or are those words synonymous?
  • What is education? Is there a difference between education and information? Or are those words synonymous?
  • Information provides facts, figures or opinions about an issue.Education teaches individuals skills on: critical thinking to weigh various sides of an issueproblem solving decision making evaluation and analyzingEducation increases awareness and knowledge and provides skills to help people make informed decisions.What type of education are you providing at your conferences, events and meetings? Information sharing or ability to practice these skills?
  • cloned learning, cloning knowledge, clone peopleNo attendee left behind : Follows a one-size-fits-all education modelCounter-productive, many attendees bored, frustrated & unmotivated to learn
  • Why do our education endeavors embrace a clone culture? How did we get here?
  • Oxford University founded in 12th century - traditional lecture still used todayMedieval UniversitySeparateDesignatedPhysical location where novices taught by more experiencedCommand - and -control authorized scholarsLecture only
  • US enters WWIINeeded to train thousands of civilians about combatMilitary created ADDIE Model (analyze, design, develop, implement and evaluate)Top down, command and control approachBrought thousands of novices to basic competenceCorp followed military's successADDIE best for novices, beginners in industryADDIE starts with needs analysis: experienced workers are better at defining own needs 
  • Industrial Revolution – we were being trained to enter a factor, work in an assembly line, everyone do the same thing and produce a product, take direction from a authority figure, command and control hierarchy,
  • US enters WWIINeeded to train thousands of civilians about combatMilitary created ADDIE Model (analyze, design, develop, implement and evaluate)Top down, command and control approachBrought thousands of novices to basic competenceCorp followed military's success
  • Historian Robert Darton suggests we live in 4th great Information AgeInvention of writing 4000 BCMove from scroll to codex (book format) in 3rd CenturyPrinting Press - Chinese in 1045 & West by Gutenberg in 1450Invention of Internet
  • Built into the structure and strategy of the Internet is collaborative, sharing models.Time Berners-Lee & other pioneers of Internet built into its structure, organization, model of governance & sustainability, a shared, interactive, participatory learning.MMOs – Massively multiplayer online role-playing require teamwork, collaboration, problem solving, evaluation, trial-and-errorMedian age of MMO player 33 yrs old; Median age of person today is 35 yrs oldPeople in 30s largest percentage of players – 6X more than teens; 3X more than college students26% of players over age of 501/3 are female60% of most active players femaleMean HHI is $85K2/3 are college gradsMost have full time job and play more than 25 hours per weekWomen play more than menOne of the major shifts in culture is participatory learning, everyone has a voice, sharing of ideas
  • Current generation of college students have no memory of life without InternetNot just about Millennials
  • Requires conference organizers to have basic literacy of how people learn
  • Communal - distinguishing good knowledge sources from questionable onesDemocratic - self-governing, open, unrestricted, uncensored
  • Older traditional environments put trust in knowledge authorities or certified expertsJohn Seely Brown has noted that it took professional astronomers many years to recognize benefits of having tens of thousands of amateur stargazers reporting on celestial activity outweighed disadvantages of unreliability
  • Traditional = authoritative, top-down, standardized, based on typical conference needs assessment
  • Move from focus on information to focus on judging reliable information
  • Traditional model emphasizes competition and hierarchy. We honor the highest grade, score, compete against each other. Its in best interest for one to get it right the fastest
  • Prisoner Dilemma is a fundamental problem in game theory that demonstrates why two people might not cooperate even if it is in both their best interests to do so. They put their own agenda and self-interest first and ultimately both fail. One of the players will defect to the other side for self-preservation but usually both defect and therefore both suffer. Networked learning rejects this and sees what’s best for the network, the group as a whole. It honors cooperation and collaboration.
  • facilitated conversations unconventional learning opps: Tweet-Ups, Tradeshow Scavenger Hunts With Mobile Devices, Speed Networking
  • Many-to-multitudes (engage those not present, those outside the conference walls that could not attendee whether due to financial restrictions or scheduling conflicts. Interchange with those in industry so that everyone benefits. [Darfur or Tibet are examples of social movements that embraced many-to-multitude]

Designing Next Generation Conference Education Sessions Designing Next Generation Conference Education Sessions Presentation Transcript

  • Designing Next Generation Conference Education Sessions
    Creating an Environment for
    Informal & Formal Learning
    in a Digital Age
    Part 1
  • Thank You!
  • Presenter – Attendee Agreement
  • Law of the Click
  • Texting, Typing Welcome#2010Connect
  • Tweet Unto Others As You Would Have Them TweetUnto You.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/ilse/3389565299/sizes/m/
  • Tweet Something Good Before You Tweet Something Bad
  • Seek First To Understand
  • Safe space to agree, disagree, ponder & question
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/donsolo/4227378751/sizes/l/
  • About Me
    • Coal Miner’s Grandson
    • West Virginia Hillbilly
    • Nonprofit Junkie
    • Environmental Advocate
    • Meeting & Event Professional
    • Education Evangelist
  • Director of Education & Engagement
  • @JeffHurt
  • 1) Identify six principles for designing next-gen conference education sessions
  • 2) Discover new ways to integrate horizontal, collaborative learning opps
  • 3) Discuss how room environments & traditional setups affect learning
  • What is education?
  • Is there a difference between education & information?
  • According to US EPA:
    Information provides facts, figures, opinions.
    Education teaches skills
    • critical thinking
    • problem solving
    • collaboration
    • decision making
    • evaluation
    • analysis
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/tinkerbots/4347648540/in/photostream/
  • Conference education often embraces a Clone Culture
  • Conference education often embraces a Clone Culture
    Cloned:
    • Learning
    • Knowledge
    • Ideas
  • Why
  • Our education endeavors built on outdated, traditional model
    • Oxford University
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/69691418@N00/4368951793/
  • Our education endeavors built on outdated, traditional model
    • Oxford University
    • WW II
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/69691418@N00/4368951793/
  • Our education endeavors built on outdated, traditional model
    • Oxford University
    • WW II
    • Industrial Revolution
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/69691418@N00/4368951793/
  • Anyone from the 1800’s could walk into most conference education sessions and feel right at home.
  • Traditional Conference Education uses a push method
    • Old
    • Training
    • Rigid
    • Program
    • Mandated
    • Formal
    LO #1
    LO #2
  • New Conference Education uses a push method
    • New
    • Learning
    • Flexible
    • Platform
    • Self-Service
    • Informal
    • Old
    • Training
    • Rigid
    • Program
    • Mandated
    • Formal
    LO #1
    LO #2
  • The Traditional Conference Push Method
    Conference & Event Organizers decide where bus going, attendees along for ride.
    (Good for newbies, bad for veterans)
    LO #1
    LO #2
  • The New Conference
    Pull Method
    Riders choose destination, speed, route & decide if they want to take detours or help others. (Best for veterans and experienced professionals)
    LO #1
    LO #2
  • Four Information Ages
    Writing
    Scroll to Codex
    Printing Press
    Internet
    Historian Robert Darton
  • Learning undergoing major change
    Internet
    MMOs
    Informal learning
    Work changes
    Culture changes
    Brain science
  • 1) Identify six principles for designing next-gen conference education sessions
  • #1: Conference ed sessions must transition to Participatory Learning
    • Internet changed how we all learn, play, socialize, engage in life
    LO #1
    LO #2
  • #1: Conference ed sessions must transition to Participatory Learning
    • Internet changed how we all learn, play, socialize, engage in life
    • Commonplace not exotic
    • About a process, not product
    LO #1
    LO #2
  • #1: Conference ed sessions must transition to Participatory Learning
    • Internet changed how we all learn, play, socialize, engage in life
    • Commonplace not exotic
    • About a process, not product
    • Not passive
    • Conversations and comments
    LO #1
    LO #2
  • #2: Conference ed sessions must transition from Presumed Authority to Collective Credibility
    • Communal
    • Democratic
    LO #1
    LO #2
  • #2: Conference ed sessions must transition from Presumed Authority to Collective Credibility
    • Problem solving through group processes
    • Interdisciplinary
    LO #1
    LO #2
  • #2: Conference ed sessions must transition from Presumed Authority to Collective Credibility
    • Requires helping attendees learn skills to address different points of views
    LO #1
    LO #2
  • #3: Conference ed sessions must transition to More Horizontal Structures
    • Traditional – authoritative, top-down
    • Knowledge gap between speaker & audience shrunk
    LO #1
    LO #2
  • #3: Conference ed sessions must transition to More Horizontal Structures
    • Corporate world emphasizing collaboration, teamwork, problem-solving
    • Knowledge making together
    LO #1
    LO #2
  • #3: Conference ed sessions must transition to More Horizontal Structures
    • Emphasis on Peer2Peer
    • Less monologues and panel dialogues
    LO #1
    LO #2
  • #4: Conference ed sessions must provide a variety Formal & Informal Learning
    • 80% of learning is from informal learning
    • Move from push to pull methods
    LO #1
    LO #2
  • #4: Conference ed sessions must provide a variety Formal & Informal Learning
    LO #1
    LO #2
    Source: Jay Cross’ Working Smarter
  • #4: Conference ed sessions must provide a variety Formal & Informal Learning
    LO #1
    LO #2
    Source: Jay Cross’ Working Smarter
  • #4: Conference ed sessions must provide a variety Formal & Informal Learning
    LO #1
    LO #2
    Source: Jay Cross’ Working Smarter
  • #5: Conference ed sessions must transition toNetworked Learning
    • Learning is social
    • Conversational and partnering
    • Developing mediation skills: Learning to… “Disagree without being disagreeable.”
    LO #1
    LO #2
  • #5: Conference sessions must transition toNetworked Learning
    • Rejects “Prisoner Dilemma”
    • Emphasizes flexibility & outcomes
    LO #1
    LO #2
  • #5: Conference sessions must transition toNetworked Learning
    • See’s learning as mobilizing networks
    • From assertive to enabling
    LO #1
    LO #2
  • #6: Conference ed sessions must beInteractive & Without Walls
    • Life-Long Learning
    • Venues with free Wi-Fi
    • Encourages sharing of social media experiences
    LO #1
    LO #2
  • #6: Conference ed sessions must beInteractive & Without Walls
    • Many-to-multitudes (engages those not present, extends messages to those restricted by $$ or schedule)Examples: Darfur, Tibet
    LO #1
    LO #2
  • #6: Conference ed sessions must beInteractive & Without Walls
    • Extending ideas, practices and even failures for betterment of the industry, profession
    LO #1
    LO #2
  • Sources: Digital Media & Learning funded by John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation from the University of Michigan & MIT
  • 2) Discover new ways to integrate horizontal, collaborative learning opps
  • Embrace Learnscaping For Conferences & Events
    • Remove barriers to learn & network
    LO #2
  • Embrace Learnscaping For Conferences & Events
    • Seed communities with content to discuss
    LO #2
  • Embrace Learnscaping For Conferences & Events
    • Increase the bandwidth of learning opps (provide informal seating areas, free charging stations)
    LO #2
  • Embrace Learnscaping For Conferences & Events
    • Plan structured, facilitated opps for peer discussion
    LO #2
  • Embrace Learnscaping For Conferences & Events
    • Give preference to facilitators more than presenters
    LO #2
  • Embrace Learnscaping For Conferences & Events
    • Be a conduit for facilitated conversations
    LO #2
  • Embrace Learnscaping For Conferences & Events
    • Conversations are the stem cells of learning: they create & transmit knowledge ~ Jay Cross
    LO #2
  • Embrace Learnscaping For Conferences & Events
    • Open conversations increase innovation
    LO #2
  • People usually forget 90% of what they learn in a class within 30 days. Majority of loss occurs within hours of class.
    German psychologist & memory researcher Hermann Ebbinghaus
    LO #3
  • LO #2
  • 3) Discuss how room environments & traditional setups affect learning
  • Traditional Theater & Classroom
    LO #3
  • Decreases
    • Peer Engagementlooking at back of heads & not eyes
    LO #3
  • Decreases
    • Attention & LearningThose sitting stage right & stage left must turn head and body up to 80 degrees to see presenter
    LO #3
  • Decreases
    • Blood Flow To BrainAny attendee that must turn neck 15 degrees or more to either side
    LO #3
  • Decreases
    • OxygenIf presenter moves around room or down aisles, turning bodies up to 180 degrees causes lower back & leg pain and the ability to breath deeply
    LO #3
  • How To Resolve
    • Set to the long wall
    Source: Dr. Paul Radde, Ph.D.
    Seating Matters
    LO #3
  • How To Resolve
    • Set to the long wall
    • Curve seating or use Chevron
    Source: Dr. Paul Radde, Ph.D.
    Seating Matters
    LO #3
  • How To Resolve
    • Set to the long wall
    • Curve seating or use Chevron
    • Face each chair directly
    Source: Dr. Paul Radde, Ph.D.
    Seating Matters
    LO #3
  • How To Resolve
    • Set outside chairs, still in straight rows, toward presentation
    Source: Dr. Paul Radde, Ph.D.
    Seating Matters
    LO #3
  • How To Resolve
    • Set outside chairs, still in straight rows, toward presentation
    • Provide multiple screens
    Source: Dr. Paul Radde, Ph.D.
    Seating Matters
    LO #3
  • Stimulate More Of The Senses
    LO #3
  • Visuals Trump Other Senses
    LO #3
  • 80% of the info the brain receives is visual
    Source: Dr. Robert LeamnsonUniversity of Massachusetts at Dartmouth
    LO #3
  • Light & Coloraffects how the brain learns
    Source: Dr. Robert LeamnsonUniversity of Massachusetts at Dartmouth
    LO #3
  • Long Wave Colors (red, orange, yellow) stimulate more active brain responses
    Source: V. Vuontela, 1999
    LO #3
  • Short Wave Length (green, blue, violet) more conduciveto relaxation
    Source: V. Vuontela, 1999
    LO #3
  • Combine Audio With Visual
    +
    LO #3
  • LO #3
    Source: Edgar Dale, Audio-Visual Methods in Teaching
  • Odors Help With Brain Recall
    LO #3
  • When tested on details of movie while smell of popcorn wafts into air, remember 10%-50% more
    LO #3
    Source: Proust Affect, Chue, S. & Downes, JJ (2002)
  • LO #3
    Source: Proust Affect, Chue, S. & Downes, JJ (2002)
  • Active Learning Increases Memory Retention & Stability
    LO #3
    Source: Edgar Dale, Audio-Visual Methods in Teaching
  • Active Learning: Discussions help recall
    LO #3
  • LO #2
  • 1) Identify six principles for designing next-gen conference education sessions
  • 2) Discover new ways to integrate horizontal, collaborative learning opps
  • 3) Discuss how room environments & traditional setups affect learning
  • Designing Next Generation Conference Education Sessions
    Continue The ConversationThursday, May 13, 12 pm ET, 9 am PT
    Twitter - #Eventprofs
  • Case Study: Unassociated – An Unconference for AssociationProfessionals
    Part IITuesday, May 25, 2 – 3 pm ET
    Lindy Dreyer & Maddie Grant
    • jhurt@velvetchainsaw.com
    • jeffhurtblog.com
    • @JeffHurt