Working Together to Ensure Healthier Families
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
236
On Slideshare
236
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • “ Working Together to Ensure Healthier Families.” [alternate title – “It Begins with Trust” Every year 500,000 children are born to first-time mothers who are from low-income households. [Presentation note: If applicable… Here in [state/community in which presentation is being made] that number is __________. I’m here today to talk with you about a unique community health program, Nurse-Family Partnership, that has been developed specifically to transform the lives of these first-time mothers and their children. These are tough times and we are all facing hard choices. As a result, we are all looking to invest in programs that work. I’m proud to say that Nurse-Family Partnership works - more than 30 years of randomized controlled clinical trials prove that it works, and a number of independent studies also show that the program can more than pay for itself.
  • Nurse-Family Partnership was developed over 30 years ago. Our founder, David Olds, was a young man who taught in an inner-city day-care center in the late 1970’s. That experience caused him to suspect that by age four or five some children who come from disadvantaged homes were already in trouble. He began to think hard about when to get involved to help these children and his investigation led him to develop a program for women like the one pictured here – first time mothers. I think you may have read the quote by now, which helps you to understand why Dr. Olds and our program are so committed to first-time mothers.
  • It’s important to know that this is a proven opportunity for you and your community. Before I go into the presentation, I want to start with four important points: We are an evidence-based community health program. This is important. We are in tough times and you need to know that with Nurse-Family Partnership you will invest in a program with more than 30 years of evidence that shows it WORKS! We transform the lives of our clients – first-time, low-income mothers. Mothers who work with their nurse will do better in school, improve their economic well-being and become an active and involved parent who is present for her child. We are unique in that each mother is partnered with a registered nurse who is trained in the exacting standards of NFP by the National Service Office. This unique relationship between nurse and mother begins early in her pregnancy and each mother receives ongoing visits that continue through her child’s second birthday. Finally, independent research shows that every dollar invested in Nurse-Family Partnership can yield as much as five dollars in return. (RAND corp. 2005)
  • This is a quote from an NFP in Pennsylvania. For those of us in the room who are mothers, and for any of us who are parents, I think this resonates. Having a first child is a remarkable experience, but it is not without anxiety. Women in the high-risk population we serve already face enormous challenges – including poverty, a dangerous physical environment, isolation, being young and lacking education. For them, the anxiety is even greater and the generational risk even more profound… What is remarkable about our nurses is that they establish a powerful relationship with each young mother that helps them transform their lives and connect with their children.
  • But why start during the first trimester when the mother is still pregnant with her first child? As this chart shows, during the first 30 months of a child’s life – the period in which Nurse-Family Partnership works with our clients – basic functions related to vision, hearing, and language develop, and it is during this time period that trained registered nurses can have a huge impact on both mother and child. Women can enroll in Nurse-Family Partnership as early in their pregnancy as they wish, but no later than their 28th week. By starting early in pregnancy, the nurse has time to develop a strong relationship with the mother and has time to work on improving the mother’s own health, and therefore the health of the newborn. Our program is intense – with up to 64 visits over the course of 30 months. Planned visits include: 14 visits during pregnancy; 28 visits during infancy; and 22 visits during toddlerhood.
  • Nurse-Family Partnership is a disciplined program. Every nurse receives extensive training to ensure that they focus on three goals: 1. Improve pregnancy outcomes: Help women practice sound health-related behaviors, including: obtaining good prenatal care from their healthcare provider; improving their diet; and reducing personal health behaviors that can affect a child such as the use of cigarettes, alcohol and illegal drugs.   2. Improve the child’s health and development: Help parents provide responsible and competent care for their children.   3. Improve families’ economic self-sufficiency: Help parents develop a vision for their own future, plan future pregnancies, continue their education and find jobs. The program features five program components essential to the successful implementation of the program: It begins with the clients we serve – first-time, low-income mothers. We focus on families with limited resources because they are more likely to experience increased risk factors. As I have noted, nurses are a central component and the intensive services they provide helps women to learn skills as well as acquire knowledge. Why nurses? Pregnant women have many questions and concerns about their health and the baby's health, and highly value the expertise that nurses can bring to them during this critical life transition. One nurse who works with us noted that many times our clients don’t understand what’s going on and they can be intimidated by a doctor. Working with their nurse on a continual basis allows them the time they need to build trust and ask questions. This relationship is an important part of our program’s success. Nurse-Family Partnership is a rigorous program. During each visit, a nurse collects information which is fed into a database that our national office in Denver maintains. This enables your local agency to monitor the program, using the information to ensure the same results that we have seen during the first 30 years are realized in your community. Visit-by-visit guidelines are also provided to help our nurses structure each engagement so that it adheres to key components of our program but remains adaptable to each family’s needs.
  • Home visits focus on six core areas beginning with the mother’s personal health and the maternal role. Nurses also work with mothers on issues that can affect their development and their child including environmental health issues and the influence of family and friends. Life course development focuses on the mother’s future, and nurses also help their clients navigate the health and human services system to take advantage of resources that can benefit both mother and child.
  • You have heard me talk a lot about the importance of evidence, and I think it’s worth taking time to make clear why evidence-based community health programs are important. 30 years of evidence from randomized, controlled trials prove that Nurse-Family Partnership works. The process that our founder David Olds followed is the same process used in the field of medicine. Well-designed randomized, controlled trials are an accepted research practice in medicine and are essential in producing valid, actionable evidence about what does and does not work. Medical breakthroughs that are the result of randomized, controlled trials include vaccines for polio, measles, and hepatitis B, as well as cancer treatments that have dramatically improved survival rates from leukemia, Hodgkin’s disease and breast cancer.   For public health programs, evidence from clinical trials often is not required. This is changing as policymakers, public health officials and the communities they serve increasingly demand proven approaches for addressing public health. I’m here to tell you that if you invest in Nurse-Family Partnership, you can be assured of the value of your investment. With results from three randomized, controlled trials over three decades with diverse groups in Elmira, NY, Memphis, TN, and Denver, CO, Nurse-Family Partnership has set itself apart as one of the leading evidence-based programs in the country. In fact, NFP was just named one of only two “Top Tier” early childhood programs identified by the nonprofit, nonpartisan Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy as meeting the highest standards of scientific evidence [in case asked, the other progam is Success for All for grades K-2 (a school-wide reform program, primarily for high-poverty elementary schools, with a strong emphasis on reading instruction).]
  • This slide provides an overview of the three locations – Elmira, NY, Memphis, TN, and Denver, CO – where Dr. Olds conducted the randomized, controlled trials. The Elmira study was conducted through a community non-profit agency focused on promoting child development. This was a poor impoverished community with high rates of child abuse, and a mostly white population. The Memphis study was conducted through a county health department with African-American women. The Denver study included over 40% Hispanic women through a University outreach program in a highly fragmented health care system. Varied setting and populations were important to test the program carefully and assure replicability. Follow-up studies with participants from all three trials continue today - many of the children are now parents and grandparents themselves. Please see the website, Proven Results section for access to the published research.
  • We believe this slide helps to make clear why 30 years of evidence is important to you. Nurse-Family Partnership’s evidence and track record of successful replication of the program are why so many communities across the nation are confident that investing in NFP makes sense!
  • Let’s look at some specific outcomes from the trials: The first graph shows the results of children born to mothers in Memphis who had low psychological resources. The children had better reading and math achievement at age 9 than their counterparts who were not in the program. The graph on the right shows results from the Denver trial of children born to mothers who had low psychological resources – the children in the Denver trial who participated in the program showed better language development at age 4, making them better prepared to start school.
  • The children of mothers participating in the Memphis trial had fewer healthcare encounters for injuries and ingestions, including fewer days hospitalized in their first two years of life. The mothers also had greater intervals between births of first child and second child. The reduction in unplanned, closely-spaced pregnancies is extremely important in reducing risks for other negative outcomes such as child maltreatment and injuries, and enmeshment in poverty.
  • Nurse-visited mothers in the Memphis trial also spent fewer months using welfare and food stamps. Each study has been reevaluated and participants have undergone subsequent interviews and follow-ups to find out if the program effects seen while families were receiving home visits faded out once the program ended, or were sustained over time. The good news is that Nurse-Family Partnership is a program with lasting impact – the results of each follow-up study continue to show positive outcomes [Note to presenter: At the time of Memphis study, the assistance program was called “Aid to Families with Dependant Children” (AFDC); today it is known as TANF.]
  • These are indeed difficult times and we all need to make careful choices. As we consider how and where we should invest, I’d like to take some time to talk about the return on investment you can realize when you invest in Nurse-Family Partnership and bring the program to your community.
  • Nurse-Family Partnership benefits don’t end at the family-level. This slide shows the return on investment for communities that invest in NFP – and it shows why we serve the most vulnerable families. You can see that for lower risk families – those who are middle class, married and have other resources – NFP provides benefit. But look at the second group –higher risk families. An analysis conducted in 2005 by the Rand Corporation found a net benefit to society of $34,148 per higher-risk family served (high risk=low socioeconomic status and unmarried). That’s a return of $5.70 for each dollar spent on the program. For those higher-risk families, the analysis found that communities recovered the cost of the program by the time the child reached the age of four. And there were additional savings through the lives of both mother and child.
  • A study conducted by the Washington State Institute of Public Policy estimated a return on investment of more than $18,000 for each family enrolled, and a 1998 study by the Rand Corporation found that savings accrue in areas such as health care delivery, child protection, education, criminal justice, mental health and welfare and public assistance. In addition, communities also realize a benefit through increased taxes paid by employed parents. [Note to presenter: Various cost-benefit analyses have been conducted, and they often-times vary on the amount of total return estimated depending on which outcomes were monetized and included in the calculation.]
  • This information is from a 2008 report by the Pennsylvania State University that shows savings to Fayette County, as well as the entire state of Pennsylvania. The study estimates that the 25 Nurse-Family Partnership sites in operation in 2005 were collectively saving the state $119 million. The pie chart shows where those savings come from -- 74% from reductions in crime -- and another 24% of the savings come from the prevention of child abuse and neglect, and from education savings due to improvements in the children’s school readiness. It should be noted that this particular study focuses on criminal justice-related savings so it does not include savings from health care.
  • In a 2004 report the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, examined the cost savings they could reasonably project if they were to implement Nurse-Family Partnership at large scale. Using local statistics on health indicator and local costs, they concluded the program would be highly cost-effective and are now in a multi-year effort to bring Nurse-Family Partnership to thousands of New York City women living in poverty.
  • While Nurse-Family Partnership remains focused on the mothers we serve and the communities and agencies that partner with us, we are gaining increased attention at the national level. We believe this interest is part of an ongoing trend to identify and invest in community health programs that work and we welcome the chance to talk with you about how we can work together to benefit mothers and our community. Or as some might say – Nurse-Family Partnership is real change.
  • It’s important to note that one of the primary reasons we are successful is because of the agencies we work with. They are exceptional and all of our agency partners across the country share eight common characteristics: They have a strong reputation for serving low-income families They have excellent working relationships with referral sources and early childhood programs They are committed to innovation and to evidence-based programs They are committed to growing and expanding the program They are effective at recruiting and retaining nurses They are flexible and focused on enabling nurses to succeed They are financially strong and stable Finally, we work together well and share a strong alignment with mission and priorities
  • During the past 15 years, Nurse-Family Partnership has successfully expanded to communities throughout the U.S. In doing so, our National Service Office staff work with agencies to identify funding sources. That’s because public funding is essential if we are to reach every eligible mother. As this slide shows, states rely on highly varied funding streams from public and private organizations. We can get funding from many sources because we are an innovative community health program with profound broad benefits. While our most common funding stream is Medicaid – Nurse-Family Partnership has so much potential for positive impacts as children grow older, that we can tap a variety of public funding sources to support the program. In 2010, the National Service Office successfully advocated for federal funding with the help of NFP champions across the country, resulting in the historic Federal Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program created by Congress.
  • Our local agencies benefit from a close relationship with the National Service Office of Nurse-Family Partnership and its partners. This is a unique element of our program. Because we are evidence-based and feature a program that require rigorous and disciplined training, Nurse-Family Partnership has an office in Denver, Colorado with full-time staff that work to train and educate nurses, provide ongoing clinical support, and also provide operations support to agency partners. Support from the national service office includes a national database that allows us to ensure that the results in your community match up with the results we have documented from 30 years of randomized, controlled trials. This is important in that it helps the communities we serve to make clear to residents the benefit of a Nurse-Family Partnership.
  • Nurse-Family Partnership has had tremendous growth since the National Service Office was founded in 2003 with a mission of replicating the program in communities across the country.  As of February 2013, Nurse-Family Partnership programs are in 42 states, the U.S. Virgin Islands and in more than 500 counties. But we have much work to do – approximately 600,000 children are born to eligible mothers every year. And while we have accomplished a lot, we still have a long way to go to make this program available to all eligible mothers.
  • So, here in [NAME GOES HERE] we currently serve… enter data as needed. Characteristics of our population include: LIST AS NEEDED
  • We are seeing tremendous success here in [COMMUNITY NAME]… Outcomes we have observed to date include: LIST AS NEEDED
  • In closing, I wanted to provide you with examples of other voices that endorse Nurse-Family Partnership. These include U.S. Senators and mayors… [we will create several versions of this slide with people of interest in specific areas of the country…]
  • They also include national and local media that have covered our success across the country. Samples of these articles, and other stories, are included in the packet I will give to you today. Also, we provide a News Center on our Web site that lists media coverage from around the country.
  • Finally, many agencies, organizations and independent “think tanks” have strongly endorsed Nurse-Family Partnership in recent years. Each of these organizations recommends Nurse-Family-Partnership because of our strong scientific foundation and our published findings. In short – they endorse Nurse-Family Partnership because it works.
  • Thank you for your time today – I welcome the chance to answer any questions you may have.

Transcript

  • 1. Working Together to Ensure Healthier Families Nurse-Family Partnership Overview
  • 2. 2 "There is a magic window during pregnancy…it’s a time when the desire to be a good mother and raise a healthy, happy child creates motivation to overcome incredible obstacles including poverty, instability or abuse with the help of a well-trained nurse." David Olds, PhD, Founder, Nurse-Family Partnership
  • 3. Cover this gray area with one of the 8 provided filmstrip photo JPG files. © Copyright 2011 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved. • An evidence-based, community health program • Transforming lives of vulnerable first-time mothers living in poverty • Improving prenatal care, quality of parenting and life prospects for mothers by partnering them with a registered nurse Every dollar invested in Nurse-Family Partnership can yield up to five dollars in return. 3 Nurse-Family Partnership is… Overview © Copyright 2013 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved.
  • 4. 4 "They always say babies don’t come with instruction manuals, but if there was one, the Nurse-Family Partnership would be it." Andrea, Mom from Pennsylvania
  • 5. Cover this gray area with one of the 8 provided filmstrip photo JPG files. © Copyright 2011 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved. 5Overview © Copyright 2012 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved.© Copyright 2013 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved.
  • 6. Cover this gray area with one of the 8 provided filmstrip photo JPG files. © Copyright 2011 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved. 6 Program Goals •Improve pregnancy outcomes •Improve child health and development •Improve parents’ economic self- sufficiency • First-time, at-risk mothers • Registered nurses • Intensive services (intensity, duration) • Focus on behavior • Program fidelity (performance management system) • Knowledge, judgment and skills • High level of trust, low stigma • Credibility and perceived authority • Nursing theory and practice at core of original model Overview Key Program Components Why Nurses? © Copyright 2013 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved.
  • 7. © Copyright 2011 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved. Home Visit Overview 7Overview Personal Health Health Maintenance Practices Nutrition and Exercise Substance Use Mental Health Functioning Environmental Health Home Work, School, and Neighborhood Life Course Development Family Planning Education and Livelihood Maternal Role Mothering Role Physical Care Behavioral and Emotional Care Family and Friends Personal network Relationships Assistance with Childcare Health and Human Services Service Utilization © Copyright 2013 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved.
  • 8. © Copyright 2011 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved. Evidence-Based Policy 8 Research The Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy has cited Nurse-Family Partnership - “as one of only two interventions meeting the Top Tier, and if implemented more broadly, could help spark rapid progress against major national problems.” © Copyright 2013 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved.
  • 9. © Copyright 2011 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved. Trials of the Program 1977 Elmira, NY Participants: 400 Population: Low-income whites Studied: Semi-rural area 9 1988 Memphis, TN Participants: 1,139 Population: Low-income blacks Studied: Urban area 1994 Denver, CO Participants: 735 Population: Large portion of Hispanics Studied: Nurse and paraprofessionals Dr. Olds’ research & development of NFP continues today… Research © Copyright 2013 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved.
  • 10. "The great thing about Nurse-Family Partnership is that it works. To put it simply…it decreases about everything you want to decrease and increases about everything you’d want it to increase." Dr. Thomas R. Frieden, former New York City Health Commissioner (now Director, CDC, and Administrator, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry)
  • 11. Cover this gray area with one of the 8 provided filmstrip photo JPG files. © Copyright 2011 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved. 11Research © Copyright 2013 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved.
  • 12. Cover this gray area with one of the 8 provided filmstrip photo JPG files. © Copyright 2011 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved. 12Research © Copyright 2013 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved.
  • 13. Cover this gray area with one of the 8 provided filmstrip photo JPG files. © Copyright 2011 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved. 13Research © Copyright 2013 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved.
  • 14. "If communities are truly interested in making sound investments that will yield high public and private gains in both the long and short run, they would fare far better by investing in evidence-based, early child development initiatives like Nurse-Family Partnership than in professional sports stadiums or office towers." Rob Grunewald, Associate Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis
  • 15. Cover this gray area with one of the 8 provided filmstrip photo JPG files. © Copyright 2011 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved. 15Monetary Benefits to Society Monetary Savings © Copyright 2013 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved.
  • 16. Cover this gray area with one of the 8 provided filmstrip photo JPG files. © Copyright 2011 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved. 16 Nurse-Family Partnership is Cost-Effective • The RAND Corporation estimates Nurse-Family Partnership can return up to $5.70 for each $1 spent on the program.* Savings accrue to government from decreased spending on: health care criminal justice child protection mental health education public assistance And increased taxes paid by employed parents • Nurse-Family Partnership ranked among the highest programs reviewed in terms of net benefit to society among pre-K, child welfare, youth development, mentoring, youth substance prevention and teen pregnancy prevention programs. A 2012 cost-benefit update by WSIPP estimated long-term benefits of almost $23,000 per participant.** (Washington State Institute for Public Policy 2012) Monetary Benefits to Society * RAND Corporation 1998, 2005; return for highest risk families ** Savings related to low birth weight, child injuries and immunizations not included © Copyright 2013 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved.
  • 17. Cover this gray area with one of the 8 provided filmstrip photo JPG files. © Copyright 2011 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved. 17Monetary Benefits to Society Used with permission from the Prevention Research Center for the Promotion of Human Development/2005 data Fayette County, PA Number of families served 280 Benefit minus cost per family $37,367 Per dollar return on investment $3.59 Total economic benefit for Fayette County $10,462,707 State of PA Estimated number of NFP programs statewide 25 Estimated number of families served statewide 3200 Total potential economic benefit statewide $119,574, 400 © Copyright 2013 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved.
  • 18. Cover this gray area with one of the 8 provided filmstrip photo JPG files. © Copyright 2011 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved. 18 Anticipated program effects per 100 participating families •50% decrease in language delays at 21 months resulting in a savings of $133,000-$440,000* •50% reduction in child abuse and neglect among children from birth to two years, resulting in a savings of $38,500* •29% reduction in subsequent births within two years after the birth of the first child and a 14% increase in time between first and second births, reducing risk of premature delivery and saving $80,933 for every premature birth that was prevented* *Source: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene 2004 Monetary Benefits to Society © Copyright 2012 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved.
  • 19. "This program saves money. It raises healthy babies and creates better parents. It reduced childhood injuries and unintended pregnancies, increased father involvement and women's employment, reduced use of welfare and food stamps, and increased children's school readiness." Barack Obama, U.S. Senator (now President)
  • 20. Cover this gray area with one of the 8 provided filmstrip photo JPG files. © Copyright 2011 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved. 20 Characteristics of Nurse-Family Partnership Implementing Agencies •Strong reputation •Excellent working relationships •Committed •Flexible and supportive of nursing staff •Financially stable •Effective •Mission driven •Focused on success How It Works © Copyright 2012 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved.
  • 21. Cover this gray area with one of the 8 provided filmstrip photo JPG files. © Copyright 2011 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved. 21 Sources of Nurse-Family Partnership Funding • Medicaid • TANF/Public Welfare • Title V/Maternal and Child Health Initiatives • Child Abuse Prevention • Juvenile Justice/Delinquency Prevention • Substance Abuse and Mental Health • Tobacco Settlement • United Way • State, City and County General Funds • Private Philanthropy • School Readiness • Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (federal) How It Works © Copyright 2012 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved.
  • 22. Cover this gray area with one of the 8 provided filmstrip photo JPG files. © Copyright 2011 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved. 22 The National Service Office How It Works Insert photos from office not nurse and mom • Prepares communities and agencies to implement Nurse-Family Partnership model with fidelity • Educates nurse home visitors and nurse supervisors • Provides ongoing clinical support • Provides ongoing agency management and operations support • Advocates for local political support and long-term resources • Provides resources/training for marketing and community outreach • Collects and evaluates data to ensure quality services and to guide quality improvement © Copyright 2013 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved.
  • 23. Cover this gray area with one of the 8 provided filmstrip photo JPG files. © Copyright 2011 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved. 23 Nurse-Family Partnership is a growing, national program 42 States that NFP serves Number of counties NFP is serving Where we work 505 Tribal agencies are denoted by Band Map does not include program in U.S. Virgin Islands © Copyright 2013 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved.
  • 24. Cover this gray area with one of the 8 provided filmstrip photo JPG files. © Copyright 2011 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved. 24 Jefferson County, CO NFP Client Demographics • A total of 1148 women have been enrolled in the program since inception in 2000 with an average of 88 per year • Approximately 525 infants have been born to NFP mothers • There have been 333 Graduations from the program Data as of (insert date) Where we work © Copyright 2013 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved.
  • 25. Cover this gray area with one of the 8 provided filmstrip photo JPG files. © Copyright 2011 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved. 25 (Any town) NFP Outcomes Where we work © Copyright 2013 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved.
  • 26. 26 "The Nurse-Family Partnership empowers first-time mothers with the resources and knowledge to provide an environment in which children can reach their full potential." Former U.S. Senator Arlen Specter (R-PA) "The success of the Nurse-Family Partnership is undeniable: this program should be expanded to every community in this country, not just a select few." Ken Salazar, former U.S. Senator (now Interior Secretary) "I am very proud that Milwaukee was chosen to be a Nurse-Family Partnership site because this is a proven cost- effective investment in the well-being of children and families." Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett
  • 27. 2727 “If there is any hope that Congress' new health care bill will put some restraints around the growth in medical costs, it rests in the part of the proposal that calls for rewarding programs that reshape how medicine gets practiced…the Administration has the chance to invest in one such program – the Nurse-Family Partnership – when it starts giving out $1.5 billion in home health care grants...” 5.25.10 Full coverage: www.nursefamilypartnership.org > About > News “Infant development strategies, like other forms of social capital, are perversely distributed in America - fetishized in places where babies are fundamentally secure and likely to prosper, undervalued in places where babies are not. The NFP aims, in a fashion, at equalization.” Katherine Boo 2.6.06 “If you want to invest societal resources where they will have the biggest benefit for all of us, clearly the evidence is there now that protecting children from the worst kinds of deprivation in their youngest years will result in more functional, capable, prosocial citizens.” Martha Farah, director of the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of PA 3.2.09 “ We're all better off if we make the investment upfront. I would rather see us be involved early and have it be an educational situation, as opposed to no involvement and then become part of the criminal justice system.” Patrick Perez, sheriff of Kane County, IL and member of Fight Crime: Invest in Kids 4.14.10
  • 28. © Copyright 2011 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved. 28 Nurse-Family Partnership is Endorsed as a Model Program by National Institute on Early Education Research World Health Organization Office of Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Prevention © Copyright 2012 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved.
  • 29. Cover this gray area with one of the 8 provided filmstrip photo JPG files. © Copyright 2011 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved. 29 For More Information Nurse-Family Partnership National Service Office 1900 Grant Street, Ste 400 Denver, Colorado 80203 www.nursefamilypartnership.org © Copyright 2013 Nurse-Family Partnership. All rights reserved.