service design
   What
   Why
   How
What is ServiceDesign?
DESIGN

                           1) Producing stuffs
by understanding the relationships between form and function, aesth...
DESIGN

2) Problem-solving
plus form-giving and usability
DESIGN

              3) Thinking and process
Looking at the world and respond, make things visible, and prototype
DESIGN

4) Creating solutions starting from users


     SERVICE DESIGN

1. Design 'in a broader social context’
          than mere product creation


SERVICE DESIGN

 2. Nebulous, intangible


SERVICE DESIGN

   3. Collaboration
       …Systematic


                  SERVICE DESIGN

The
design
of
intangible
experiences
that
reach
people
through
   
many
different
touch...


                    Design Areas


          User
experience
design





                                               ...
(Tradi:onal)
design

                       Industrially
manufactured

                       and
consumed
separately

   ...
Why ServiceDesign?
Service design approach


                                        1)
User‐centric

To
find
ways
to
re‐engage
people
in
the
...
What are
       The Goals of
Good Service Design?
         A
proposal
of
13
tac:cs
from
Iain
Bordin

1) Temporalities
     The
city
that
never
sleeps.

• 
     quot;
.
.
.
capitalism
and
the
modern
city
have
increasingly
ma...
2) Performance
     quot;The
good
life
of
the
city
should
incorporate
all
manner
of
spaces
where
people

• 
     can
gyrat...
3) Media
     quot;
.
.
.
poten:al
mee:ng
places,
where
glances,
touches,
smiles,
words,
gossip,

• 
     observa:ons
and
...
4) Remembering
     quot;
.
.
.
a
testa‐ment
to
the
struggles,


• 
     remarkable
spirit,
and
las:ng
achievements


    ...
5) Quietude
     quot;[Quiet
aspects
of
the
city]
that
do
not
seek
to
proclaim
their
presences
with
an

• 
     immediate
...
6) Uncertainty and Risk
     quot;We
need
a
city
which
we
do
not
know,
which
we
not
understand,
which
we
have
not

• 
    ...
7) Provisional Identities
     quot;

.
.
.
people
are
constantly
being
reconstructed
and
reimagined
in
ci:es
today,

• 
 ...
8) Fluidity
     quot;Although
undoubtedly
necessary
to
demarcate
our
private
homes
and
places
of

• 
     work
.
.
.
boun...
9) Interventions
     quot;
.
.
.
we
need
the
security
of
hospitals,
homes,
and
schools,
offices,
factories,
and

• 
     ai...
10) Play
     quot;[Play]
tells
us
that
aggression
in
ci:es
is
latent
and
not
always
detrimental,
that

• 
     being
ridi...
1 Active Health
                        1)
     quot;
.
.
.
too
oben
healthy
ac:vity
is
solely
confined
to
the
self‐conscio...
12) Active Thinking
     quot;
.
.
.
a
place
where
we
are
asked
about
poli:cs,
ethics,
and
morality,
about
the

• 
     en...
13) Emotions
     “Without
a
full
range
of
emo:ons‐that
is,
without
a
full
range
of
the
meanings
and

• 
     possibili:es...
Questions for Discussion

•  Is
this
a
service?

•  Where
is
the
boundary
drawn
between
object

   and
objec:ve?

•  What
...
A service
How to design
Service design process


                                  1)
Service
ecology

                 To
map
out
the
actors,
rel...
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Transcript of "Service Design"

  1. 1. service design What Why How
  2. 2. What is ServiceDesign?
  3. 3. DESIGN 1) Producing stuffs by understanding the relationships between form and function, aesthetics and usefulness
  4. 4. DESIGN 2) Problem-solving plus form-giving and usability
  5. 5. DESIGN 3) Thinking and process Looking at the world and respond, make things visible, and prototype
  6. 6. DESIGN 4) Creating solutions starting from users
  7. 7. 
 SERVICE DESIGN 1. Design 'in a broader social context’ than mere product creation
  8. 8. 
 SERVICE DESIGN 2. Nebulous, intangible
  9. 9. 
 SERVICE DESIGN 3. Collaboration …Systematic
  10. 10. 
 SERVICE DESIGN The
design
of
intangible
experiences
that
reach
people
through 
many
different
touch
points,
and
that
happen
over
:me. 
 ‐
Live|Work
 Any
ac:vity
or
benefit
that
one
party
can
give
to
another,
that
is 
essen:ally
intangible
and
does
not
result
in
the
ownership
of 
anything.
Its
produc:on
may
or
may
not
be
:ed
to
a
physical 
product
 ‐
<What
is
service
design?>
by
Bill
Hollins 

  11. 11. 
 Design Areas User
experience
design
 Industrial
 design
 Informa:on
 Interac:on
 Architecture
 design
 Communica:on
 Design
 Human
 User
Interface
 Factors
 Engineering
 Usability
 Engineering
 Human‐Computer
 Interac:on
 ‐
<Designing
for
interac:on>
by
Dan
Saffer 

  12. 12. (Tradi:onal)
design
 Industrially
manufactured
 and
consumed
separately
 Object
 Own
 Product
design
 Experience
design
 Service design User
par:cipa:ng

 in
produc:on
process
 Objec:ve
 Use
 Tangible
 Intangible
 Intangible
 Authorship
 Collabora:on
 Collabora:on
 Individual
(social)
 Social
 Individual
(social)

  13. 13. Why ServiceDesign?
  14. 14. Service design approach
 1)
User‐centric
 To
find
ways
to
re‐engage
people
in
the
services
they
use
and
make
them
par:cipate
to
service
produc:on.
 2)
Network
 To
create
networks
that
enable
services
ei.
Social
networks,
technological
systems

 3)
Sustainability
 To
be
economically,
socially
and
environmentally
sustainable

  15. 15. What are The Goals of Good Service Design? A
proposal
of
13
tac:cs
from
Iain
Bordin

  16. 16. 1) Temporalities The
city
that
never
sleeps.
 •  quot;
.
.
.
capitalism
and
the
modern
city
have
increasingly
marshaled
us
into
various
 •  forms
of
schedule,
appointemnts,
mee:n
gslots,
diaries,
calendar
dates,
and
 windows
of
opportunty
.
.
.yet
other
:mes
are
also
possible
‐
:mes
of
the
body
and
 nature,
:mes
of
moments,
circularity,
indeterminate
length
and
movement.”

  17. 17. 2) Performance quot;The
good
life
of
the
city
should
incorporate
all
manner
of
spaces
where
people
 •  can
gyrate,
glide,
and
rotate,
mime,
perform,
and
declaim,
climb,
descend,
and
 traverse,
and
act
out
opinions

  18. 18. 3) Media quot;
.
.
.
poten:al
mee:ng
places,
where
glances,
touches,
smiles,
words,
gossip,
 •  observa:ons
and
opinions
all
have
the
possibility
of
being
transferredquot;

  19. 19. 4) Remembering quot;
.
.
.
a
testa‐ment
to
the
struggles,

 •  remarkable
spirit,
and
las:ng
achievements

 of
everyday
urban
ci:zens.quot;

  20. 20. 5) Quietude quot;[Quiet
aspects
of
the
city]
that
do
not
seek
to
proclaim
their
presences
with
an
 •  immediate
and
unaviodable
declama:on.

Compared
to
the
architecture
of
 shou:ng,
these
other,
more
re:ring
designs
are
like
asides,
off‐stage
whispers
.
.
.quot;

  21. 21. 6) Uncertainty and Risk quot;We
need
a
city
which
we
do
not
know,
which
we
not
understand,
which
we
have
not
 •  yet
encountered,
which
is
simultaneously
strange,
familiar,
and
unknown
to
us.quot;

  22. 22. 7) Provisional Identities quot;

.
.
.
people
are
constantly
being
reconstructed
and
reimagined
in
ci:es
today,
 •  and
this
is
the
way
that
ci:es
must
then
be
design
‐
not
for
predictable,
monolithic
 sectors
of
the
popula:on

.
.
.
but
for
various
different
and
compe:ng
tastes,
 opinions,
and
outlooks.quot;

  23. 23. 8) Fluidity quot;Although
undoubtedly
necessary
to
demarcate
our
private
homes
and
places
of
 •  work
.
.
.
boundaries
do
not
always
have
to
be
frontal
and
brutal
in
their
 expression,
not
always
challenging
and
confronta:onal
to
those
who
nego:ate
 them.quot;

  24. 24. 9) Interventions quot;
.
.
.
we
need
the
security
of
hospitals,
homes,
and
schools,
offices,
factories,
and
 •  airports.

And
at
other
:mes
we
need
different
kinds
of
architecture,
those
which
 appropriate
rather
than
dominate,
and
those
which
intervene
and
a`ach
rather
 than
impose
and
replace.quot;

  25. 25. 10) Play quot;[Play]
tells
us
that
aggression
in
ci:es
is
latent
and
not
always
detrimental,
that
 •  being
ridiculous
is
okay,
that
all
of
us
are
in
some
way
children
at
heart
.
.
.”
 Is
this
too
relegated
to
bars
in
NYC?
 • 
  26. 26. 1 Active Health 1) quot;
.
.
.
too
oben
healthy
ac:vity
is
solely
confined
to
the
self‐conscious
gym
or
 •  regimented
sports
field.

Ac:ve
health
means
being
energe:c
in
all
parts
of
our
 lives
.
.
.quot;

  27. 27. 12) Active Thinking quot;
.
.
.
a
place
where
we
are
asked
about
poli:cs,
ethics,
and
morality,
about
the
 •  environment,
nature,
and
climate,
about
friend,
families
and
desires
.
.
.quot;

  28. 28. 13) Emotions “Without
a
full
range
of
emo:ons‐that
is,
without
a
full
range
of
the
meanings
and
 •  possibili:es
of
how
it
feels
to
be
human
we
are
as
yet
unfulfilled,
and
the
good
life
 is
yet
to
be
achieved.”

  29. 29. Questions for Discussion •  Is
this
a
service?
 •  Where
is
the
boundary
drawn
between
object
 and
objec:ve?
 •  What
tac:cs
does
it
seem
to
employ?
 •  Does
the
employment
of
certain
tac:cs
come
 at
the
cost
of
others?

  30. 30. A service How to design
  31. 31. Service design process
 1)
Service
ecology
 To
map
out
the
actors,
rela:onships,
and
values!
–
sustainability
 2)
Touch
points
 To
make
up
the
total
experience
by
managing
all
touch
points
mul:dimensional
as
well
as
consistent
 3)
Service
envy
 To
create
expressive
and
communica:ve
values
 4)
Evidencing
 To
make
early
qualita:ve
judgments
about
the
implica:ons
of
a
design
 5)
Experience
prototyping
 To
get
an
in:mate
and
subject
idea
beforehand
 6)
Service
experience
model
 To
set
up
a
proposal
for
the
new
service
design
for
the
evalua:on
and
further
development
 7)
Service
blueprin:ng
 To
provide
details
about
from
the
new
service’s
implementa:on
to
maintenance

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