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Service Design

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  • 1. service design What Why How
  • 2. What is ServiceDesign?
  • 3. DESIGN 1) Producing stuffs by understanding the relationships between form and function, aesthetics and usefulness
  • 4. DESIGN 2) Problem-solving plus form-giving and usability
  • 5. DESIGN 3) Thinking and process Looking at the world and respond, make things visible, and prototype
  • 6. DESIGN 4) Creating solutions starting from users
  • 7. 
 SERVICE DESIGN 1. Design 'in a broader social context’ than mere product creation
  • 8. 
 SERVICE DESIGN 2. Nebulous, intangible
  • 9. 
 SERVICE DESIGN 3. Collaboration …Systematic
  • 10. 
 SERVICE DESIGN The
design
of
intangible
experiences
that
reach
people
through 
many
different
touch
points,
and
that
happen
over
:me. 
 ‐
Live|Work
 Any
ac:vity
or
benefit
that
one
party
can
give
to
another,
that
is 
essen:ally
intangible
and
does
not
result
in
the
ownership
of 
anything.
Its
produc:on
may
or
may
not
be
:ed
to
a
physical 
product
 ‐
<What
is
service
design?>
by
Bill
Hollins 

  • 11. 
 Design Areas User
experience
design
 Industrial
 design
 Informa:on
 Interac:on
 Architecture
 design
 Communica:on
 Design
 Human
 User
Interface
 Factors
 Engineering
 Usability
 Engineering
 Human‐Computer
 Interac:on
 ‐
<Designing
for
interac:on>
by
Dan
Saffer 

  • 12. (Tradi:onal)
design
 Industrially
manufactured
 and
consumed
separately
 Object
 Own
 Product
design
 Experience
design
 Service design User
par:cipa:ng

 in
produc:on
process
 Objec:ve
 Use
 Tangible
 Intangible
 Intangible
 Authorship
 Collabora:on
 Collabora:on
 Individual
(social)
 Social
 Individual
(social)

  • 13. Why ServiceDesign?
  • 14. Service design approach
 1)
User‐centric
 To
find
ways
to
re‐engage
people
in
the
services
they
use
and
make
them
par:cipate
to
service
produc:on.
 2)
Network
 To
create
networks
that
enable
services
ei.
Social
networks,
technological
systems

 3)
Sustainability
 To
be
economically,
socially
and
environmentally
sustainable

  • 15. What are The Goals of Good Service Design? A
proposal
of
13
tac:cs
from
Iain
Bordin

  • 16. 1) Temporalities The
city
that
never
sleeps.
 •  quot;
.
.
.
capitalism
and
the
modern
city
have
increasingly
marshaled
us
into
various
 •  forms
of
schedule,
appointemnts,
mee:n
gslots,
diaries,
calendar
dates,
and
 windows
of
opportunty
.
.
.yet
other
:mes
are
also
possible
‐
:mes
of
the
body
and
 nature,
:mes
of
moments,
circularity,
indeterminate
length
and
movement.”

  • 17. 2) Performance quot;The
good
life
of
the
city
should
incorporate
all
manner
of
spaces
where
people
 •  can
gyrate,
glide,
and
rotate,
mime,
perform,
and
declaim,
climb,
descend,
and
 traverse,
and
act
out
opinions

  • 18. 3) Media quot;
.
.
.
poten:al
mee:ng
places,
where
glances,
touches,
smiles,
words,
gossip,
 •  observa:ons
and
opinions
all
have
the
possibility
of
being
transferredquot;

  • 19. 4) Remembering quot;
.
.
.
a
testa‐ment
to
the
struggles,

 •  remarkable
spirit,
and
las:ng
achievements

 of
everyday
urban
ci:zens.quot;

  • 20. 5) Quietude quot;[Quiet
aspects
of
the
city]
that
do
not
seek
to
proclaim
their
presences
with
an
 •  immediate
and
unaviodable
declama:on.

Compared
to
the
architecture
of
 shou:ng,
these
other,
more
re:ring
designs
are
like
asides,
off‐stage
whispers
.
.
.quot;

  • 21. 6) Uncertainty and Risk quot;We
need
a
city
which
we
do
not
know,
which
we
not
understand,
which
we
have
not
 •  yet
encountered,
which
is
simultaneously
strange,
familiar,
and
unknown
to
us.quot;

  • 22. 7) Provisional Identities quot;

.
.
.
people
are
constantly
being
reconstructed
and
reimagined
in
ci:es
today,
 •  and
this
is
the
way
that
ci:es
must
then
be
design
‐
not
for
predictable,
monolithic
 sectors
of
the
popula:on

.
.
.
but
for
various
different
and
compe:ng
tastes,
 opinions,
and
outlooks.quot;

  • 23. 8) Fluidity quot;Although
undoubtedly
necessary
to
demarcate
our
private
homes
and
places
of
 •  work
.
.
.
boundaries
do
not
always
have
to
be
frontal
and
brutal
in
their
 expression,
not
always
challenging
and
confronta:onal
to
those
who
nego:ate
 them.quot;

  • 24. 9) Interventions quot;
.
.
.
we
need
the
security
of
hospitals,
homes,
and
schools,
offices,
factories,
and
 •  airports.

And
at
other
:mes
we
need
different
kinds
of
architecture,
those
which
 appropriate
rather
than
dominate,
and
those
which
intervene
and
a`ach
rather
 than
impose
and
replace.quot;

  • 25. 10) Play quot;[Play]
tells
us
that
aggression
in
ci:es
is
latent
and
not
always
detrimental,
that
 •  being
ridiculous
is
okay,
that
all
of
us
are
in
some
way
children
at
heart
.
.
.”
 Is
this
too
relegated
to
bars
in
NYC?
 • 
  • 26. 1 Active Health 1) quot;
.
.
.
too
oben
healthy
ac:vity
is
solely
confined
to
the
self‐conscious
gym
or
 •  regimented
sports
field.

Ac:ve
health
means
being
energe:c
in
all
parts
of
our
 lives
.
.
.quot;

  • 27. 12) Active Thinking quot;
.
.
.
a
place
where
we
are
asked
about
poli:cs,
ethics,
and
morality,
about
the
 •  environment,
nature,
and
climate,
about
friend,
families
and
desires
.
.
.quot;

  • 28. 13) Emotions “Without
a
full
range
of
emo:ons‐that
is,
without
a
full
range
of
the
meanings
and
 •  possibili:es
of
how
it
feels
to
be
human
we
are
as
yet
unfulfilled,
and
the
good
life
 is
yet
to
be
achieved.”

  • 29. Questions for Discussion •  Is
this
a
service?
 •  Where
is
the
boundary
drawn
between
object
 and
objec:ve?
 •  What
tac:cs
does
it
seem
to
employ?
 •  Does
the
employment
of
certain
tac:cs
come
 at
the
cost
of
others?

  • 30. A service How to design
  • 31. Service design process
 1)
Service
ecology
 To
map
out
the
actors,
rela:onships,
and
values!
–
sustainability
 2)
Touch
points
 To
make
up
the
total
experience
by
managing
all
touch
points
mul:dimensional
as
well
as
consistent
 3)
Service
envy
 To
create
expressive
and
communica:ve
values
 4)
Evidencing
 To
make
early
qualita:ve
judgments
about
the
implica:ons
of
a
design
 5)
Experience
prototyping
 To
get
an
in:mate
and
subject
idea
beforehand
 6)
Service
experience
model
 To
set
up
a
proposal
for
the
new
service
design
for
the
evalua:on
and
further
development
 7)
Service
blueprin:ng
 To
provide
details
about
from
the
new
service’s
implementa:on
to
maintenance


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