How to Tell a Story Visually (Litchfield)
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  • inspiring – awareness – informative – getting involved – time sensitive
  • inspiring – awareness – informative – getting involved – time sensitive
  • inspiring – awareness – informative – getting involved – time sensitive
  • inspiring – awareness – informative – getting involved – time sensitive
  • inspiring – awareness – informative – getting involved – time sensitive
  • inspiring – awareness – informative – getting involved – time sensitive
  • inspiring – awareness – informative – getting involved – time sensitive
  • inspiring – awareness – informative – getting involved – time sensitive
  • inspiring – awareness – informative – getting involved – time sensitive
  • inspiring – awareness – informative – getting involved – time sensitive
  • inspiring – awareness – informative – getting involved – time sensitive
  • inspiring – awareness – informative – getting involved – time sensitive
  • inspiring – awareness – informative – getting involved – time sensitive
  • inspiring – awareness – informative – getting involved – time sensitive
  • inspiring – awareness – informative – getting involved – time sensitive
  • Wide shot – you are establishing the environment where the events of your story will be taking place. This will help the audience orientate themselves within the story. Medium shot – engages the viewer to the characters of the story – shows who the story will be focusing on. Close-up shot – Shows the details of the story – pieces that make of the story elements.
  • I wanted to orientate the 4-H TV youth in the building at the fairgrounds. The story is not centered on the building, so I did not need a large establishing shot. This scene is just about one youth teach another how to use the camera.
  • The medium shot is not that different from the wide, but it does focus the viewer specifically on our two youths and what they are discussing.
  • The close up is simply the detail of what they are talking about. Notice, the camera is about as large as they were in the medium shot. A wider shot over the youths shoulder would not have illustrated that the camera is what they are discussing – that detail would have been lost in all of the information of the wider image.
  • Side by side.
  • The should in the right hand corner helps orientate the viewer.

Transcript

  • 1. How to Tell a Story Visually Jed Findlay
  • 2. How to tell a story visually• Knowing your audience• Determining the message• Deciding on a form• Pre, Production and Post• Technical tips
  • 3. Audience• WHO – Who are they? What do we know about them? What do we want them to think and do?
  • 4. Audience• HOW DO I APPLY THIS – Length of film - Age appropriate language – pacing – style – delivery – music – form – colors
  • 5. Determining the Message• What is the purpose?• What are the outcomes / call to action?• What will the audience think, know, feel, and do as a result?
  • 6. Choosing a Form• Documentary• Short Film• Abstract
  • 7. Documentary• Narrator• Interviews• What is your role as the filmmaker?• Watch
  • 8. Short Film• Script• Characters• Watch
  • 9. Abstract• Music video• Art piece• Watch
  • 10. PRE-PRODUCTION• Write out a script!!! – Regardless of form• Scout locations – Audio concerns
  • 11. PRE-PRODUCTION• Check equipment – Charge batteries• Make a checklist – Equipment – Script
  • 12. PRODUCTION• Be thorough – Re-shoot if you are unsure• Remember Message and Audience
  • 13. PRODUCTION• Be aware of AUDIO!!!!!!!!• Be aware of BACKGROUND!!!!!!!!
  • 14. PRODUCTION• PROTECT YOUR FOOTAGE!!!!
  • 15. POST-PRODUCTION• Transfer the footage – Immediately back it up on a separate drive – Steps are different for each editing software – Label folders appropriately
  • 16. POST-PRODUCTION• SAVE SAVE SAVE• Edit a rough cut – Don’t sweat the details yet – Find the entire story
  • 17. POST-PRODUCTION• Watch your audio levels• Balance music and natural sounds• Color time your shots• Watch – re-watch.. And watch again
  • 18. POST-PRODUCTION• Export a full HD version• Export more compressed versions for uploading• SAVE SAVE SAVE
  • 19. Technical Tips
  • 20. Shoot a variety of shots • Wide – Establish the events • Medium – More engaging • Close up – Show the details
  • 21. Wide Shot • Establish the event
  • 22. Medium Shot • Engage the viewer in the event
  • 23. Close-Up Shot • Show the details
  • 24. Camera Placement • Medium shot
  • 25. Camera Placement • Close-Up shot
  • 26. Get at the Eye level of subjects • Viewer identifies with subject through eye level • Often Youth are shot from Adult perspective • Use angles appropriately
  • 27. Get at the Eye level of subjects
  • 28. Youth Eye Level
  • 29. Composition • Compose each shot vs
  • 30. Composition • Story within composition
  • 31. Composition • Leading looks
  • 32. Composition • Leading looks
  • 33. Composition • Leading looks
  • 34. Composition • Leading looks
  • 35. Composition • Leading looks
  • 36. Shot composition• Framing Lead space
  • 37. Shot composition• Framing Lead space
  • 38. Shot composition• Framing Lead space
  • 39. Composition• Framing Head room
  • 40. Composition• Framing Head room
  • 41. Composition• Framing Head room
  • 42. Be in front of the action • Shoot faces, not the backs of heads • Only use if you are emphasizing what is ahead of the subject
  • 43. Lighting • Make sure the lighting is balanced • Use reflectors or white boards • Use lights
  • 44. Lighting vs Too hot Balanced
  • 45. Background • Background should not distract from the subject • Too bright • Moving images • Distracting people (picking nose)
  • 46. Background vs Bad Bad
  • 47. Background vs Bad Good
  • 48. Zoom• Use the zoom appropriately – don’t over-use• A zoom is done for a shot – not because of distance
  • 49. Use a Tripod • Purchase a tripod • It should be a choice between hand held or tripod
  • 50. Summary• Find out who the Audience is• Determine your message• Decide on a form• Pre, Production and Post
  • 51. Questions Jed Findlay jfindlay@iastate.edu