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Smoky Mountain Secrets
Smoky Mountain Secrets
Smoky Mountain Secrets
Smoky Mountain Secrets
Smoky Mountain Secrets
Smoky Mountain Secrets
Smoky Mountain Secrets
Smoky Mountain Secrets
Smoky Mountain Secrets
Smoky Mountain Secrets
Smoky Mountain Secrets
Smoky Mountain Secrets
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Smoky Mountain Secrets

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A preview of "Smoky Mountain Secrets" - Folk Remedies for the Nature Lover, by author Jean Marlowe.

A preview of "Smoky Mountain Secrets" - Folk Remedies for the Nature Lover, by author Jean Marlowe.

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business
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  • 1. “Smoky Mountain Secrets”Folk Remedies for the Nature Lover<br />
  • 2. About the Author<br />Jean is a mother, grandmother, business-owner, entrepreneur, civil and human rights advocate and nature lover. She lives in the beautiful Smoky Mountains of NC with her dog, Foxy, and her cat, Silvey. She has been featured in numerous media sources including newspaper, film, radio, television (including CNN, Wolf Blitzer, MSNBC, Nancy Grace, WLOS, WSPA and WYFF) She was featured in a documentary produced by Open Democracy and directed by journalist, Charles Shaw, entitled “The Unheard Voices Project”. She has been in numerous magazines, is a featured speaker and instructor.<br />
  • 3. About Smoky Mtn. Secrets<br />Smoky Mountain Secrets gives readers an easy to follow tutorial of how, for generations, the Cherokee & Appalachian settlers used the plentiful natural plants of this great land for all kinds of ailments and treatments. Many of the medicines today, albeit chemical versions, are still derived from the knowledge of what our ancestors learned years ago. Many of the folks in western NC still use the remedies that Miss Marlowe has compiled into this concise book plus Jean takes it a step further and shares traditions that were passed down to her with instructions and guidance on how to best prepare, care for and transform these natural herbs into medicinal use.<br />
  • 4. Smoky Mountain Medicinal Plantsfeatured in the book<br />Boneset: <br />Boneset is known in many areas of the Appalachians by its folk name of Indian Sage. It was widely used in the treatment of influenza and the body aches that accompany high fever. Boneset Infusions were used to treat everything from cold and flu to rheumatism.<br />
  • 5. A few plants from the book<br />Elder<br />Elder is a beautiful shrub that grows up to 15 feet tall in open sunny areas. Although all parts of the elder shrub is medicinal, the flowers and berries are most commonly used in herbal medicine. Infused elder leaves are used topically as a wash for wounds and burns. <br />
  • 6. A few plants from the book<br />Ginseng<br />Ginseng nourishes all body fluids. It is a specific remedy for coughs and lung inflammation with fever. Ginseng helps restore flexibility in the ligaments and tendons, moistens the skin and mucus membranes, and nourishes the blood.<br />
  • 7. A few plants from the book<br />Pleurisy Root<br />Pleurisy Root was used to treat coughing, chest complaints, congestion and breathing difficulties. Herbalists still use it today as a bronchial dilator and stimulating expectorant. It breaks up and eliminates lung congestion.<br />
  • 8. A few plants from the book<br />Jewelweed<br />In today’s world, Jewelweed retains its place as one of the most effective remedies to relieve skin inflammation, rash, and itching caused by poison ivy. Appalachian women would rub their children with fresh jewelweed leaves to prevent a reaction to poison ivy.<br />
  • 9. A few plants from the book<br />Sassafras<br />Appalachian peoples used sassafras for rheumatism, hives, measles, skin eruptions and rashes. Infusions of the bark were used to treat diarrhea, worms and other parasites. Hot sassafras root tea is drunk to relieve fevers from colds and flu.<br />
  • 10. A few plants from the book<br />Turtlehead<br />During the Civil War, Turtlehead was used to treat “impure conditions of the blood” such as jaundice, hepatitis and constipation. It was also used as a remedy for indigestion, bloating and an appetite stimulator.<br />
  • 11. A few plants from the book<br />Yellowroot<br />Yellowroot was used to treat jaundice, hepatitis, and chronic liver problems and to heal ulcers. A decoction was used to cleanse wounds, as a gargle and mouthwash for sore throat, thrush and bleeding gums. Salves are used to treat sores, persistent ulcers, fungal infections and to heal wounds.<br />
  • 12. Get Your Copy Now!<br />“Smoky Mountain Secrets” – Folk Remedies for the Nature Lover <br />Now available though:<br />www.outskirtspress.com/JeanMarlowe<br />To contact author for a book signing, appearance, event, or interview, please contact us at:<br />Oldengreen Inc.<br />828-748-4876 or email: oldengreen@gmail.com<br />

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