Ch 5

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  • Your audience's response to every message you send depends heavily on their perception of your credibility , a measure of your believability based on how reliable you are and how much trust you evoke in others. With colleagues and long-term customers, you've already established some degree of credibility based on past communication efforts, and these people automatically lean toward accepting each new message from you because you haven't let them down in the past. With audiences who don't know you, however, you need to establish credibility before they'll listen fully to your message. Whether you're working to build credibility with a new audience, to maintain credibility with an existing audience, or even to restore credibility after a mistake, consider emphasizing the following characteristics: Honesty. Demonstrating honesty and integrity will earn you the respect of your colleagues and the trust of everyone you communicate with, even if they don't always agree with or welcome the messages you have to deliver. Objectivity. Audiences appreciate the ability to distance yourself from emotional situations and to look at all sides of an issue. They want to believe that you have their interests in mind, not just your own. Awareness of audience needs. Let your audience know that you understand what's important to them. If you've done a thorough audience analysis, you'll know what your audience cares about and their specific issues and concerns in a particular situation. Credentials, knowledge, and expertise. Every audience wants to be assured that the messages they receive come from people who know what they're talking about. To establish credibility with a new audience, put yourself in their shoes and identify the credentials that would be most important to them. Endorsements. If your audience doesn't know anything about you, you might be able to get assistance from someone they do know and trust. Performance. It's easy to say you can do something, but following through can be much harder. That’s why demonstrating impressive communication skills is not enough; people need to know they can count on you to get the job done. Communication style. If you support your points with evidence that can be confirmed through observation, research, experimentation, or measurement, audience members will recognize that you have the facts, and they'll respect you.
  • Ch 5

    1. 1. Writing Business Messages© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - 1 Chapter
    2. 2. Three-Step Writing Process• Planning• Writing• Completing© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - 2 Chapter
    3. 3. Adapt to the Audience• Sensitivity• Relationships• Style and tone© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - 3 Chapter
    4. 4. Audience Sensitivity• Adopt a “you” attitude• Demonstrate business etiquette• Emphasize the positive• Use bias-free language© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - 4 Chapter
    5. 5. The “You” Attitude• Instead of this: To help us process this order, we must ask for another copy of the requisition.• Use this: So that your order can be filled promptly, please send another copy of the requisition.© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - 5 Chapter
    6. 6. Business Etiquette• Practice courtesy• Be diplomatic• Respond promptly© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - 6 Chapter
    7. 7. Emphasize the Positive• Instead of this: • Use this: – Cheap merchandise – Bargain prices – Toilet paper – Bathroom tissue – Used cars – Resale cars – High-calorie foods – High-energy food – Elderly person – Senior citizen – Pimples and zits – Complexion problems © Business Communication Today 8e 5 - 7 Chapter
    8. 8. Bias-Free Language• Age• Gender• Disability• Race or ethnicity© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - 8 Chapter
    9. 9. A Strong Audience Relationship• Establish your credibility• Build the company’s image© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - 9 Chapter
    10. 10. Establish Your Credibility• Honesty and objectivity• Awareness of audience needs• Credentials, knowledge, expertise• Endorsements• Performance• Communication style© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - Chapter
    11. 11. Build the Company’s Image• Stay positive• Be a spokesperson• Minimize your views• Observe others• Ask for assistance• Support the company© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - Chapter
    12. 12. Controlling Style and Tone• Use a conversational tone• Write in plain English• Select active or passive voice© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - Chapter
    13. 13. Conversational Tone• Business messages – Avoid using pompous language – Avoid preaching or bragging – Control emotions and intimacy – Use humor carefully© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - Chapter
    14. 14. Writing in Plain English• Straightforward• Easily to understand• Conversational© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - Chapter
    15. 15. Using the Right Voice• Active voice – Subject + verb + object• Passive voice – Object + verb + subject© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - Chapter
    16. 16. Composing the Message• Word choice• Sentences• Paragraphs© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - Chapter
    17. 17. Choosing the Best Words• Correct grammar• Effectiveness – Function words and content words • Denotation and connotation • Abstraction and concreteness© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - Chapter
    18. 18. Finding Words that Communicate• Choose strong words• Prefer familiar words• Avoid clichés• Use jargon carefully© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - Chapter
    19. 19. Writing Effective Sentences• Types of sentences – Simple – Compound – Complex – Compound-complex© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - Chapter
    20. 20. Writing Coherent Paragraphs• Paragraph elements – Topic sentence – Related sentences – Transitions© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - Chapter
    21. 21. Effective Transitions Additional Detail •Moreover, furthermore, in additionCausal Relationship •Therefore, because, since, thus Comparison •Similarly, likewise, still, in comparison Contrast •Whereas, conversely, yet, however Illustration •For example, in particular, in this case Time Sequence •Formerly, after, meanwhile, sometimes Summary •In brief, in short, to sum up © Business Communication Today 8e 5 - Chapter
    22. 22. Paragraph Development• Illustration• Comparison and contrast• Cause and effect• Classification• Problem and solution© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - Chapter
    23. 23. Composing E-Mail• Keep content appropriate• Avoid personal messages• Respect the chain of command• Promote e-mail hygiene• Don’t send unnecessary messages• Avoid insensitive, insulting e-mail© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - Chapter
    24. 24. Arranging E-Mail• Arranging – Include the original question – State the desired response – Write a concise message© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - Chapter
    25. 25. Adapting E-Mail• Level of formality – Audience – Purpose • Informative subject line • Personalized message© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - Chapter
    26. 26. Formatting E-Mail• Prefer basic formatting• Use proper capitalization• Minimize acronyms• Avoid emoticons© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - Chapter
    27. 27. Word Processing Tools• Style sheets and templates• Auto completion or correction• File or mail merge• Endnotes and footnotes• Indexes and tables of contents• Wizards© Business Communication Today 8e 5 - Chapter

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