By Group C
<ul><li>Pan-Slavism  was a movement in the mid-19th century aimed at unity of all the Slavic peoples. The main focus was i...
<ul><li>Extensive Pan-Slavism began much like Pan-Germanism, both of which grew from the sense of unity and nationalism ex...
 
<ul><li>The First Pan-Slav congress was held in Prague, Bohemia in June, 1848, during the revolutionary movement of 1848. ...
<ul><li>The authentic idea of unity of the Slavic people was all but gone after World War I when the maxim &quot;Versaille...
 
 
 
<ul><li>As a result of World War I, socialistic ideas experienced a boom as they spread not only in Germany and the Austri...
<ul><li>A second political effect of World War I centers solely on the treatment of Germany in the Treaty of Versailles of...
<ul><li>The Weimar government set up in Germany in 1918 was ill-liked by most of the citizens and maintained little power ...
<ul><li>World War I did not completely end with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles, for its political, economic and p...
<ul><li>Despite the advantages brought forth by developing technologies, the war mainly had a damaging effect on the econo...
 
<ul><li>Question </li></ul><ul><li>Pan-Slavism  was a movement in the mid-19th century aimed at_________. </li></ul><ul><l...
<ul><li>Questions </li></ul><ul><li>the most popular type of government to gain influence after World War I was the </li><...
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World war one

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  • ((((Describe)))) Akshay
  • Rahul
  • Pan-Slavism  was a movement in the mid-19th century aimed at unity of all the Slavic peoples. The main focus was in the Balkans where the South Slavs had been ruled for centuries by other empires, Byzantine(Bisantin) Empire, Austria-Hungary, the Ottoman Empire, and Venice. It was also used as a political tool by both the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union, which gained political-military influence and control over all Slavic-majority nations between 1945 and 1948. Jayanarayan
  • Extensive Pan-Slavism began much like Pan-Germanism, both of which grew from the sense of unity and nationalism experienced within ethnic groups under the domination of France during the Napoleonic Wars. Like other Romantic nationalist movements, Slavic intellectuals and scholars in the developing fields of history, philology, and folklore actively encouraged the passion of their shared identity and ancestry. Pan-Slavism also co-existed with the Southern Slavic independence. Commonly used symbols of the Pan-Slavic movement were the Pan-Slavic colours (blue, white and red) and the Pan-Slavic anthem,  Hey, Slavs . Akshay
  • Pan Slavic Flag This is the map of European Pan-Slavic Nations Hussain
  • The First Pan-Slav Congress, Prague, 1848 The First Pan-Slav congress was held in Prague, Bohemia in June, 1848, during the revolutionary movement of 1848. The Czechs had refused to send representatives to the Frankfurt Assembly feeling that Slavs had a distinct interest from the Germans.  Pan-Slavism in Central Europe The first Pan-Slavic convention was held in Prague in 1848 and was specifically both anti-Austrian and anti-Russian[citation needed]. Pan-Slavism has some supporters among Czech politicians but never gained dominant influence, possibly other than treating Czechs and Slovaks as branches of a single nation Rahul
  • The authentic idea of unity of the Slavic people was all but gone after World War I when the maxim &amp;quot;Versailles and Trianon have put an end to all Slavisms&amp;quot; and was finally put to rest with the fall of communism in Central and Eastern Europe in late 1980s. With the breakup of Pan-Slavic states such as Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia and the problem of Russian and Serbian dominance in any proposed all-Slavic organisation, [ citation needed ]  the idea of Pan-Slavic unity is mostly considered dead. Akshay
  • With this we conclude our presentation on Pan-Savism . Now we are going to the topic “Governmental and Political Changes” Farhan
  • Governmental and Political Changes after World War 1 Jayanarayan
  • These are some effects Ahras
  • As a result of World War I, socialistic ideas experienced a boom as they spread not only in Germany and the Austrian empire but also made advances in Britain (1923) and France (1924). However, the most popular type of government to gain influence after World War I was the republic. Before the war, Europe contained 19 monarchies and 3 republics, yet only a few years afterward, had 13 monarchies, 14 republics and 2 regencies. Evidently, revolution was in the air and people began to more ardently express their desires for a better way of life. Akshay
  • A second political effect of World War I centers solely on the treatment of Germany in the Treaty of Versailles of 1919. The Germans were forced to sign a humiliating treaty accepting responsibility for causing the war, as well as dole out large sums of money in order to compensate for war costs. In addition, the size of the German state was reduced, while that of Italy and France was enlarged. Jayanarayan
  • The Weimar government set up in Germany in 1918 was ill-liked by most of the citizens and maintained little power in controlling the German state. Rising hostilities toward the rest of Europe grew, and many German soldiers refused to give up fighting, even though Germany&apos;s military was ordered to be drastically reduced. Given such orders, numerous German ex-soldiers joined the Freikorps, an establishment of mercenaries available for street-fighting. The open hostility and simmering feelings of revenge exhibited by Germany foreshadowed the start of World War II. Rahul
  • World War I did not completely end with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles, for its political, economic and psychological effects influenced the lives of people long after the last shot was fired. Two main political changes rocked the world after the war: a greater number of countries began to adopt more liberal forms of government, and an angered Germany tried to cope with the punitions doled out to them by the victors, as its hostilities rose to the point where it provoked the second world war two decades later. Akshay
  • Despite the advantages brought forth by developing technologies, the war mainly had a damaging effect on the economies of European countries. People&apos;s hopes and spirits also floundered, as they grew distrustful of the government and tried to cope with the enormous death toll of the war. The turbulent period after World War I called for a major readjustment of politics, economic policies, and views on the world. Jayanarayan
  • Weapon Making is the first picture The other 2 are grave yards of soldiers who were victims of WWI Conditions of people
  • World war one

    1. 2. By Group C
    2. 3. <ul><li>Pan-Slavism  was a movement in the mid-19th century aimed at unity of all the Slavic peoples. The main focus was in the Balkans where the South Slavs had been ruled for centuries by other empires, Byzantine Empire, Austria-Hungary, the Ottoman Empire, and Venice. It was also used as a political tool by both the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union, which gained political-military influence and control over all Slavic-majority nations between 1945 and 1948. </li></ul>
    3. 4. <ul><li>Extensive Pan-Slavism began much like Pan-Germanism, both of which grew from the sense of unity and nationalism experienced within ethnic groups under the domination of France during the Napoleonic Wars. Like other Romantic nationalist movements, Slavic intellectuals and scholars in the developing fields of history, philology, and folklore actively encouraged the passion of their shared identity and ancestry. Pan-Slavism also co-existed with the Southern Slavic independence. </li></ul><ul><li>Commonly used symbols of the Pan-Slavic movement were the Pan-Slavic colours (blue, white and red) and the Pan-Slavic anthem,  Hey, Slavs . </li></ul>
    4. 6. <ul><li>The First Pan-Slav congress was held in Prague, Bohemia in June, 1848, during the revolutionary movement of 1848. The Czechs had refused to send representatives to the Frankfurt Assembly feeling that Slavs had a distinct interest from the Germans.  </li></ul>The first Pan-Slavic convention was held in Prague in 1848 and was specifically both anti-Austrian and anti-Russian[citation needed]. Pan-Slavism has some supporters among Czech politicians but never gained dominant influence, possibly other than treating Czechs and Slovaks as branches of a single nation
    5. 7. <ul><li>The authentic idea of unity of the Slavic people was all but gone after World War I when the maxim &quot;Versailles and Trianon have put an end to all Slavisms&quot; and was finally put to rest with the fall of communism in Central and Eastern Europe in late 1980s. With the breakup of Pan-Slavic states such as Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia and the problem of Russian and Serbian dominance in any proposed all-Slavic organisation, the idea of Pan-Slavic unity is mostly considered dead. </li></ul>
    6. 11. <ul><li>As a result of World War I, socialistic ideas experienced a boom as they spread not only in Germany and the Austrian empire but also made advances in Britain (1923) and France (1924). However, the most popular type of government to gain influence after World War I was the republic. Before the war, Europe contained 19 monarchies and 3 republics, yet only a few years afterward, had 13 monarchies, 14 republics and 2 regencies. Evidently, revolution was in the air and people began to more ardently express their desires for a better way of life. </li></ul>
    7. 12. <ul><li>A second political effect of World War I centers solely on the treatment of Germany in the Treaty of Versailles of 1919. The Germans were forced to sign a humiliating treaty accepting responsibility for causing the war, as well as dole out large sums of money in order to compensate for war costs. In addition, the size of the German state was reduced, while that of Italy and France was enlarged. </li></ul>
    8. 13. <ul><li>The Weimar government set up in Germany in 1918 was ill-liked by most of the citizens and maintained little power in controlling the German state. Rising hostilities toward the rest of Europe grew, and many German soldiers refused to give up fighting, even though Germany's military was ordered to be drastically reduced. Given such orders, numerous German ex-soldiers joined the Freikorps, an establishment of mercenaries available for street-fighting. The open hostility and simmering feelings of revenge exhibited by Germany foreshadowed the start of World War II. </li></ul>
    9. 14. <ul><li>World War I did not completely end with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles, for its political, economic and psychological effects influenced the lives of people long after the last shot was fired. Two main political changes rocked the world after the war: a greater number of countries began to adopt more liberal forms of government, and an angered Germany tried to cope with the punitions doled out to them by the victors, as its hostilities rose to the point where it provoked the second world war two decades later. </li></ul>
    10. 15. <ul><li>Despite the advantages brought forth by developing technologies, the war mainly had a damaging effect on the economies of European countries. People's hopes and spirits also floundered, as they grew distrustful of the government and tried to cope with the enormous death toll of the war. The turbulent period after World War I called for a major readjustment of politics, economic policies, and views on the world. </li></ul>
    11. 17. <ul><li>Question </li></ul><ul><li>Pan-Slavism  was a movement in the mid-19th century aimed at_________. </li></ul><ul><li>The First Pan-Slav congress was held in ______. </li></ul><ul><li>Before the war, Europe contained __monarchies and 3 republics, yet only a few years afterward, had 13 monarchies, ____republics and 2 regencies. </li></ul><ul><li>Answer </li></ul><ul><li>unity of all the Slavic peoples </li></ul><ul><li>Prague, Bohemia in June, 1848 </li></ul><ul><li>19 </li></ul><ul><li>14 </li></ul>
    12. 18. <ul><li>Questions </li></ul><ul><li>the most popular type of government to gain influence after World War I was the </li></ul><ul><li>________________. </li></ul><ul><li>The turbulent period after World War I called for a major readjustment of </li></ul><ul><li>_____________, _________________, _____________. </li></ul><ul><li>Answers </li></ul><ul><li>republic </li></ul><ul><li>Politics </li></ul><ul><li>economic policies </li></ul><ul><li>views on the world. </li></ul>
    13. 19. THE END
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