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Aup

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  • 1. AGILE UNIFIED PROCESS<br />
  • 2. Agile UP Disciplines<br />Disciplines are performed in an iterative manner, defining the activities which development team members perform to build, validate, and deliver working software which meets the needs of their stakeholders. The disciplines are:<br />Model<br />Implementation<br />Test<br />Deployment<br />Configuration Management<br />Project Management<br />Environment<br />
  • 3. Agile UP Phases<br />Phases are performed in a serial manner throughout an Agile UP project. The phases are:InceptionElaborationConstructionTransition<br />
  • 4. Inception<br />Define project scope. This includes defining, at a high level, what the system will do. Equally important is to define what the system will not do. This establishes the boundaries within which the team will operate. This usually tales the form of a list of high-level features and/or point form use cases.<br />Estimate cost and schedule. At a high level, the schedule and cost for the project are estimated. General estimates are used for iterations in later phases, more specificity is used for the early iterations in Elaboration.<br />Define risks. The risks to the project are first defined here. Risk management is important an AUP project. The list of risks is a living compilation that will change over time as risks are identified, mitigated, avoided and/or materialize and dealt with. <br />Determine project feasibility.  Your project must make sense from technical, operational, and business perspectives. In other words, you should be able to build it, once it's deployed you should be able to run it, and it should make economic sense to do these things.. <br />Prepare the project environment. This includes reserving workspace for the team, requesting the people that will be needed, obtaining hardware and software that are needed immediately, and compiling a list of anticipated hardware and software that will be needed later<br />
  • 5. Elaboration<br />The primary goal of the Elaboration phase is to prove the architecture for the system to be developed. The point is to ensure that the team can actually develop a system that satisfies the requirements, and the best way to do that is to build a end-to-end, working skeleton of the system called an "architectural prototype". <br />It is important to note that the requirements are not specified completely at this point. They are detailed only enough to understand architectural risks and to ensure that there is an understanding of the scope of each requirement so that subsequent planning can be carried out.  Architectural risks are identified and prioritized; the significant ones are addressed during Elaboration. <br />
  • 6. Construction<br />The focus of the Construction phase is to develop the system to the point where it is ready for pre-production testing.<br />Emphasis shifts now to prioritizing and understanding the requirements, model storming a solution, and then coding and testing the software.<br />
  • 7. Transition Phase<br />The Transition phase focuses on delivering the system into production. There may be extensive testing that takes place during this phase. <br />Fine-tuning of the product takes place here as well as rework to address significant defects.<br />
  • 8. Milestones<br />
  • 9. Phases Overview<br />

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