Ranking verde de electrónica 15ª edición

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Ranking verde de electrónica 15ª edición

  1. 1. 5 6 P •PHILIPS 4 •SHAR •MOTOROLA ER •AC 7 3 E •LG MSUNG •DELL •APPLE •SO • SA •PANASONIC NY •NO 8 ER 2 VO •S O N Y ICS KIA NO SHIB A S 9 1 LE WH O N • O • T O JITSU •HP ND •FU ROSOFT BE O W 10 0 E INT IC F IL T IR L •N •M GR O G ST -- GUIDE TO EE O N? + GREENER ELECTRONICS VERSION 15 greenpeace.org/electronics This Guide ranks leading mobile phone, game console, TV and PC manufacturers on their global policies and practice on eliminating harmful chemicals, taking responsibility for their products MAY 2010 once they are discarded by consumers, and their impact on the climate. Companies are ranked on information that is publicly available and clarifications and communications with the companies. greenpeace.org/electronics NOKIA Ranking = 7.5/10 Nokia stays in 1st place with a slightly increased score of 7.5, up from 7.3. It gains points for achieving its goal of phasing out brominated compounds, chlorinated flame retardants and antimony trioxide in all new models of products and for its CEO’s statement in support of 30% cuts in greenhouse gas emissions in industrialised countries by 2020. However, despite Nokia’s support for further restrictions for chlorinated and brominated substances in legislation, it loses a point on its position on the RoHS (Restriction of Hazardous Substances in electronics) Directive, as it does not openly support restrictions on at least PVC vinyl plastic, chlorinated flame retardants (CFRs) and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in the next 3-5 years i.e. in RoHS 2.0. Overall, Nokia does best on the toxic chemicals criteria, followed by energy, and does least well on e-waste issues. Nokia scores very well on toxic chemical issues; all its new models have been free of PVC since the end of 2005, and all new models of mobile phones and accessories launched in 2010 are on track to be free of these substances. Nokia scores maximum points for its comprehensive voluntary take-back programme, which spans 85 countries providing almost 5,000 collection points for end-of-life mobile phones. It also scores top marks for the information it provides to customers on what to do with their discarded products. However, its recycling rate of 3 to 5 percent is very poor; more information is needed on how Nokia calculates these figures; it also needs to start using recycled plastics beyond just for packaging. Nokia is one of the top scorers on the energy criteria. Nokia scores points for sourcing 25 percent of its total energy needs from renewable sources in 2007 and has a target to increase its use of renewable energy to 50 percent by 2010. Top marks (doubled) are given for product energy efficiency as all but one of its mobile phone chargers exceed the Energy Star requirements by between 30 and 90 percent. It also scores full marks for committing to reduce its own absolute CO2 emissions by a minimum of 10 percent in 2009 and 18 percent in 2010, from a baseline year of 2006. Nokia provides a third party verification certificate for its disclosed CO2 emissions. NOKIA Overall Score BAD (0) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) GOOD (3+) Precautionary Principle and support for revision of RoHS Directive. Chemicals Management Timeline for PVC & BFR phaseout Timeline for additional substances phaseout PVC-free and/or BFR-free models (companies score double on this criterion) Individual producer responsibility Voluntary take-back Information to individual customers Amounts recycled Use of recycled plastic content Global GHG emissions reduction support Carbon Footprint disclosure Own GHG emissions reduction commitment Amounts of renewable energy used Energy efficiency of new models (companies score double on this criterion)
  2. 2. NOKIA Detailed Scoring Chemicals Precautionary Principle PVC-free and/or Chemicals Timeline for Timeline for additional and support for revision of BFR-free models RoHS Directive. Management PVC & BFR phaseout substances phaseout (double points) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) GOOD (3+) GOOD (3+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) GOOD (3+) Nokia’s definition of the Nokia has already phased out Nokia has eliminated remaining Nokia has banned the use of Nokia gets maximum points as precautionary principle supports some harmful chemicals and uses of PVC. See PVC elimination beryllium oxide since 2004 and it has achieved its goal to phase taking voluntary steps to eliminate identified future substances for case study. More information. it is working to restrict beryllium out brominated compounds, potential hazardous substances elimination. More information. Nokia states that all new mobile and its compounds in the near chlorinated flame retardants and despite lack of full scientific New version (2010) of Nokia’s phones and accessories to be future with the exemption of use antimony trioxide; since the end certainty. More information. substance list. launched during 2010 are on as gold dopant. The intentional of 2009, 25 new Nokia products Nokia states that it supports track to become fully free of addition of 8 types of phthalates are free from these substances; a methodology for further bromine, chlorine and antimony is also banned in new products. all new models of mobile phones restrictions in RoHS, where trioxide. More information here More information. and accessories launched in restriction criteria are based on and here. All products from 2010 will 2010 are on track to be free of potential risk in the full product be free of antimony trioxide. these substances. life cycle. Nokia loses a point However, there is no target More information. as although it supports further to phase out other antimony Eco-declarations provided for restrictions for chlorinated and compounds. all Nokia products. brominated substances it does More information. All new models of mobile not openly support restrictions on phones are free of PVC, at least PVC, CFRs and BFRs in brominated and chlorinated the next 3-5 years in RoHS 2.0. compounds and antimony trioxide. E-Waste Provides info for Use of recycled plastic Provides voluntary Reports on amount of Support for Individual individual customers on content in products - and take-back where e-waste collected and Producer Responsibility take-back in all countries timelines for increasing no EPR laws exist recycled where products are sold content PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) GOOD (3+) GOOD (3+) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) BAD (0) Nokia supports and lobbies for Take-back is offered in 85 The information provided is very Nokia states that it gets back just Nokia is still actively researching IPR. To regain top marks, Nokia countries, including in Africa and good, with addresses, phone 3 percent of redundant phones. the use of recycled plastics, will need to explore options for Latin America, with almost 5000 numbers and directions to Nokia But it is unclear if this is as a which are currently used only in operationalising IPR. It also needs Nokia collection points globally. Care Centres and updates about percentage of all Nokia sales, or packaging. It’s about time Nokia to continue to lobby for IPR, More information here and the development of new take- all brands of mobiles returned started using recycled plastics inter alia to ensure the revised here. Although Nokia has a back programmes, most recently – and over which period and in its mobile phones, as its WEEE legislation sets clearer programme in Argentina this isn’t those launched in 10 Middle geography. More information. competitors are doing. requirements (enforcement listed on its global website. Eastern countries and 11 African Nokia reports on its collection and More information. criteria) for the implementation of More information. countries. More information. recycling achievements in China, IPR by enforcing: differentiated Take-back points. Finland, North America, Chile & financing for own-brand real Peru and Malaysia. end-of-life costs (e.g. no longer More information. collective financing such as market share but individual financing such as return share) for WEEE and preventing the indefinite use of the Visible Fee. More information. Energy Support for global Company Commitment to Amount of Energy efficiency of mandatory reduction of carbon footprint reduce own direct renewable energy New Models GHG emissions disclosure GHG emissions used (double points) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) GOOD (3+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) GOOD (3+) Nokia has signed the Bali Nokia reports on 2008 energy Nokia is committed to reducing In 2008, Nokia satisfied 25% All Nokia’s new models of Communiqué and its CEO states consumption, as well as CO2 emissions by a minimum of of its electricity demand with chargers meet or exceed the that ‘By working together even direct (231,000 tonnes of CO2 10% in 2009 and 18% in 2010, renewables by buying renewable EPA’s Energy Star requirements. the goal of achieving 30% cuts in emissions) and indirect CO2 from a baseline year of 2006. electricity certificates in Finland All except one of the currently CO2 emissions from 1990 levels emissions. More details are Nokia is to ensure that its key (RES-E Guarantee of Origin) and available chargers exceed the in industrialized countries by needed on what comprises these suppliers set energy efficiency Americas (Green-e wind). With its requirements in no load mode by 2020 is possible’. For full marks, indirect emissions. and CO2 emission reduction purchase of 30,000 wind RECs between 30 and 90%. Nokia needs to call for global GHG More information here and targets. More information. in the USA, Nokia joined the US More information. emissions to peak by 2015. here. Details of the various measures EPA’s Green Power Partnership. Nokia has published a and targets that Nokia is taking Nokia’s target for renewable verification statement. are given. More information. electricity is to increase its Nokia provides a life cycle use to cover 50% of its total analysis of a typical Nokia needs in 2010. See p.49 here. device. Although Nokia provides details of the various renewable energy certificates that it purchases, it remains on two points because it fails to address concerns about additionality and to provide more information about the EU RECs it is buying. More information here and here.
  3. 3. 5 6 P •PHILIPS 4 •SHAR •MOTOROLA ER •AC 7 3 E •LG MSUNG •DELL •APPLE •SO • SA •PANASONIC NY •NO 8 ER 2 VO •S O N Y ICS KIA NO SHIB A S 9 1 LE WH O N • O • T O JITSU •HP ND •FU ROSOFT BE O W 10 0 E INT IC F IL T IR L •N •M GR O G ST -- GUIDE TO EE O N? + GREENER ELECTRONICS VERSION 15 greenpeace.org/electronics This Guide ranks leading mobile phone, game console, TV and PC manufacturers on their global policies and practice on eliminating harmful chemicals, taking responsibility for their products MAY 2010 once they are discarded by consumers, and their impact on the climate. Companies are ranked on information that is publicly available and clarifications and communications with the companies. greenpeace.org/electronics SONY ERICSSON Ranking = 6.9/10 Sony Ericsson remains in 2nd place, with the same score of 6.9. It is the best performer on the toxic chemicals criteria of all the ranked brands, being the first to score full marks on all chemicals criteria. It also does well on energy. All Sony Ericsson products are already free from PVC vinyl plastic and brominated flame retardants (BFRs), with the exception of a few components that are still being phased out. Sony Ericsson has already met the challenge of the new criterion on chemicals by banning antimony, beryllium and phthalates from new models launched since January 2008. Moreover, Sony Ericsson is one of only two companies so far (the other is Acer) that is proactively lobbying in the EU for the revision of the RoHS (Restriction of Hazardous Substances in electronics) Directive to adopt a 3 to 5 year timeline for further restrictions on organo-chlorine and bromine substances. It is weakest on waste and recycling issues, scoring nothing on use of recycled plastic. It earns a point for reporting that, in 2008, around 5 percent of its mobile phones (based on sales volume) had been collected and recycled through European recycling schemes; figures are also given for programmes in the US, Australia and Canada. Sony Ericsson scores points on its information to consumers about its take-back programme. For more points on e-waste, it needs to continue to increase its lobbying for Individual Producer Responsibility, extend its take-back and recycling programmes, and use recycled plastic across all its products – not just a few models. On energy, Sony Ericsson scores points for committing to reduce absolute greenhouse gas emissions from its internal activities by 20 percent by 2015 (2008 baseline) and reports that 40 percent of its electricity use globally comes from renewable sources, although it needs to address concerns about the additionality of its renewable energy purchases by providing more information about its RECs (Renewable Energy Credits), details of hydro and other renewable energy (RE) sourced and clarify if this is in addition to RE sourced via the Swedish grid. Sony Ericsson has signed the Copenhagen Communiqué, which calls for global emissions to peak and begin to decline rapidly within the next decade; this scenario will require a reduction of 50-85 percent by 2050. It also states that developed countries need to take on immediate and deep emission reduction commitments that are much higher than the global average, but provides no concrete numbers. All of its products meet and exceed the Energy Star standard. It reports CO2 emissions from its own manufacturing and product transportation, but fails to have these emissions verified by a third party. SONY ERICSSON Overall Score BAD (0) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) GOOD (3+) Precautionary Principle and support for revision of RoHS Directive. Chemicals Management Timeline for PVC & BFR phaseout Timeline for additional substances phaseout PVC-free and/or BFR-free models (companies score double on this criterion) Individual producer responsibility Voluntary take-back Information to individual customers Amounts recycled Use of recycled plastic content Global GHG emissions reduction support Carbon Footprint disclosure Own GHG emissions reduction commitment Amounts of renewable energy used Energy efficiency of new models (companies score double on this criterion)
  4. 4. SONY ERICSSON Detailed Scoring Chemicals Precautionary Principle PVC-free and/or Chemicals Timeline for Timeline for additional and support for revision of BFR-free models RoHS Directive. Management PVC & BFR phaseout substances phaseout (double points) GOOD (3+) GOOD (3+) GOOD (3+) GOOD (3+) GOOD (3+) Sony Ericsson supports the Sony Ericsson is ahead of many Since 2007 all SE products have All new SE products are now SE scores maximum points Precautionary Principle as defined companies by already eliminating been PVC free and in 2009 all beryllium free and phthalate (doubled) on this criterion. by the Rio Declaration and is substances from its new products charger cables except one legacy free. Antimony is also banned All SE products are PVC-free, implementing it. It also states that that others have only identified for charger, became completely free apart from two minor remaining with the exception of cables in it supports the inclusion of BFRs future action. More information. of PVC. All models placed on the applications where antimony is early models of chargers. Since and PVC in the revision of the RoHS SE’s pdf List of Banned & market after 1 January 2008 used; alternatives have been January 2008, all new SE models Directive, together with a relevant Restricted Substances. are BFR free in circuit boards, developed for moisture protection are BFR-free with the exception of exemption process as well as an casings and cables, older models and antimony is being phased a few components whose phase improved methodology for further may still contain BFRs in circuit out, but the use of antimony in out is on-going. At present, new substance restrictions. More boards and substrates. varistors has been exempted Sony Ericsson products are 99.9% information. Evidence of Sony More information. from the phase out plan until free from all halogenated flame Ericsson’s position and lobbying Banned & Restricted replacement materials have been retardant. More information. on RoHS 2.0. More information Substances. identified. More information. Environmental product here and here. SE stated at a See also p. 7-8 Sustainability There are also a few exemptions declarations for phones and Chemsec conference held at Report. for products placed on the market mobile broadband devices. the EU Parliament, attended by before 1 January 2008. Greenpeace, that it supports a 3-5 More information. year timeline for further restrictions on organo-chlorine and bromine substances. E-Waste Provides info for Use of recycled plastic Provides voluntary Reports on amount of Support for Individual individual customers on content in products - and take-back where e-waste collected and Producer Responsibility take-back in all countries timelines for increasing no EPR laws exist recycled where products are sold content PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) BAD (0) Sony Ericsson has launched an Sony Ericsson has initiated its Sony Ericsson intends to provide Sony Ericsson estimates that in Sony Ericsson’s new ‘GreenHeart’ individual product ’environmental new ‘environmental warranty’ information to customers in all 2008 around 5% of SE phones pioneer phones use a minimum warranty’ as part of its commitment programme that includes take- the countries in which it operates. (based on sales volume) have been of 50% recycled plastics. The to Individual Producer Responsibility, back and recycling in Taiwan, More information. collected and recycled through MH300 Green Heart ™ headset by which it commits to recycle its China, Thailand, Singapore, Sony Ericsson provides links from European recycling schemes. includes 100% recycled plastics products in an environmentally Malaysia, Philippines, New its ‘support’ page to customers This figure is estimated based in most plastic parts. sound way when any SE product is Zealand, India, Australia, Israel, in Taiwan, China, Thailand, on the quantities of categories More information. taken to any designated collection USA and Canada. Sony Ericsson Singapore, Malaysia, Philippines, and products recorded by some Also p.13 2008 Sustainability point globally, regardless of intended to complete this rollout by New Zealand, India, Australia, European countries. Figures are Report. where the product was originally 2009 in all the countries in which Israel, USA, Canada and Europe. also given for programmes in the Sony Ericsson is looking to use purchased. More information. it operates, however, customers Customers in other countries are US, Australia and Canada, but it post consumer recycled plastics Also p.14 of 2008 Sustainability in Central and South America, informed that SE take-back is is not clear whether the figures further in its products. To score Report. SE also states that it Africa and the Middle East, as well coming soon. More information. given represent Sony Ericsson points, SE needs to use recycled supports legislation and participates as Russia, Turkey, Ukraine and phones or overall totals. Hundreds plastics across all its products in the process of putting legislation several South East Asian countries of thousands of obsolete mobile and report the amount of recycled in place. For full marks, SE needs are informed that take-back is phones have been collected since plastic sourced as a % of all to clarify that this means supporting ‘coming soon’. More information the start of SE’s own service plastics used. More information. differentiated/ individualised and here. operations. More information. financing for own-brand real end- of-life costs (e.g. no longer collective financing) for WEEE, and provide details of operationalisation of IPR. Energy Support for global Company Commitment to Amount of Energy efficiency of mandatory reduction of carbon footprint reduce own direct renewable energy New Models GHG emissions disclosure GHG emissions used (double points) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) GOOD (3+) Sony Ericsson signed up in Sony Ericsson reports its total Sony Ericsson has absolute From 2008 all Sony Ericsson All new models after 2005 meet support of the Bali Communiqué, GHG emissions reduced from targets to reduce its total GHG sites in Sweden purchase the requirements of Energy Star, the Poznań Communiqué and 64,426,057 kg CO2 equivalents in emissions. By 2015 it aims to: renewable energy (wind, solar and “…67% are better than the most recently the Copenhagen 2007 to 57,390,998 kg in 2008; - reduce emissions from the full and hydro), making up about EU CoC power requirements. The Communiqué, which calls for global a large part of this reduction is due life cycle of its products by 15%; 40% of the total electricity used standby power is not more than emissions to peak and begin to to a drop in business travel. For - reduce emissions from its at all Sony Ericsson sites. To 0.1 W for all new charger models decline rapidly within the next more points Sony Ericsson needs internal activities by 20%. Both regain top marks SE needs to after 2005.” More information. decade; this scenario will require to provide evidence of external targets are based on 2008 levels. address concerns about the Also p.10 2008 Sustainability a reduction of 50-85% by 2050. It verification. More information. additionality of its renewable Report . also states that developed countries More information. During 2007-2008 Sony energy purchases by providing need to take on immediate See p.11-13 & 18 of Ericsson’s CO2 emissions more information about its RECs, and deep emission reduction Sustainability Report. dropped by 11% in absolute details of hydro and other RE commitments that are much terms. See p.3 and p 12 of sourced and clarify if this is in higher than the global average, but 2008 Sustainability Report. addition to RE sourced via the provides no concrete numbers. More information. Swedish grid. More information. More information here and here.
  5. 5. 5 6 P •PHILIPS 4 •SHAR •MOTOROLA ER •AC 7 3 E •LG MSUNG •DELL •APPLE •SO •SA •PANASONIC NY •NO ER 8 2 VO •S O N Y ICS KIA NO SHIB A S 9 1 LE WH O N • O • T O JITSU •HP ND •FU ROSOFT BE O W 10 0 E INT IC F IL T IR L •N •M GR O G ST -- GUIDE TO EE O N? + GREENER ELECTRONICS VERSION 15 greenpeace.org/electronics This Guide ranks leading mobile phone, game console, TV and PC manufacturers on their global policies and practice on eliminating harmful chemicals, taking responsibility for their products MAY 2010 once they are discarded by consumers, and their impact on the climate. Companies are ranked on information that is publicly available and clarifications and communications with the companies. greenpeace.org/electronics PHILIPS Ranking = 5.1/10 Philips moves up to 3 place from 4 with a reduced score of 5.1, as a result of other companies moving down the ranking. rd th Philips scores well on toxic chemical issues; it has committed to eliminating PVC vinyl plastic and all brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in all its new product models by the end of 2010, and six types of phthalates and antimony by 31 December 2010. Beryllium and its compounds are already restricted; arsenic has been eliminated from TV glass and other display products from 2008. Philips has had TVs with PVC/BFR-free housings on the market (EU market only so far) for nearly 2 years, with little progress during this time, other than adding PVC/BFR-free Senseo and oral healthcare products and a PVC-free remote control, but these are insufficient to score one point (doubled). It also fails to support the need for the RoHS 2.0 Directive (Restriction of Hazardous Substances in electronics, currently being revised) to adopt an end-of-life focussed methodology for adding new substances and an immediate ban on organo-chlorine and bromine compounds. Philips is weakest on e-waste and recycling, scoring zero on use of recycled plastic and for no longer reporting on recycling rates based on past sales. It also scores no points for voluntary take-back and recycling as it has failed to expand its take-back programme beyond India and the pilots in Brazil and Argentina. Philips now supports Individual Producer Responsibility (IPR), is engaging in a European NGO and industry coalition in support of IPR, and is committed to actively working towards developing IPR-based recycling systems and their supporting financial mechanisms. Philips is one of the top scorers on energy, and earns full marks for supporting the levels of cuts in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions needed to abate dangerous climate change and for committing to absolute cuts in its operational carbon footprint of 25 percent by 2012 (using a baseline year of 2007). Its overall CO2 emissions dropped 10% in 2009 compared to 2008, with emissions from manufacturing decreasing by 6%. It also scores points for disclosing carbon dioxide equivalent emissions from its own operations, for sourcing 15 percent of all electricity used in 2009 from renewables and for reporting to the latest Energy Star standard. All TVs sold in the US and 90 percent of European models meet Energy Star v.3. PHILIPS Overall Score BAD (0) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) GOOD (3+) Precautionary Principle and support for revision of RoHS Directive. Chemicals Management Timeline for PVC & BFR phaseout Timeline for additional substances phaseout PVC-free and/or BFR-free models (companies score double on this criterion) Individual producer responsibility Voluntary take-back Information to individual customers Amounts recycled Use of recycled plastic content Global GHG emissions reduction support Carbon Footprint disclosure Own GHG emissions reduction commitment Amounts of renewable energy used Energy efficiency of new models (companies score double on this criterion)
  6. 6. PHILIPS Detailed Scoring Chemicals Precautionary Principle PVC-free and/or Chemicals Timeline for Timeline for additional and support for revision of BFR-free models RoHS Directive. Management PVC & BFR phaseout substances phaseout (double points) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) GOOD (3+) GOOD (3+) GOOD (3+) BAD (0) Philips’ definition of the Philips scores top marks for Philips had a goal to have certain Six types of phthalates and Philips has put on the market TVs Precautionary Principle identifies providing Product and Process models of consumer products antimony will be eliminated by with PVC/BFR-free housings (EU the need to take preventative Specs, criteria for identifying free of PVC and BFRs by the December 31 2010. Arsenic has market only so far), PBV/BFR- measures without full scientific ‘future substances’ for elimination end of 2008 and aims to phase been eliminated from TV glass free Senseo and oral healthcare certainty. More information. and examples, namely ‘reported’ out PVC and all BFRs in all new and other displays from 2008. products and a PVC-free remote However, Philips states no substances. More information. models by the end of 2010. More information. control. More information. support for the need for RoHS 2.0 Restricted substances in Philips has eliminated BFRs Beryllium and its compounds are to adopt a ban on organo-chlorine Products list. and PVC in TV housings for the already restricted with a threshold and bromine substances (at least Restricted substances in EU market, in Senseo and oral of 1000 ppm, but include PVC, CFRs and BFRs within 3 – 5 Processes list. healthcare products. exemptions. More information. years), as well as an end-of-life Criteria for identifying ‘future’ More information. Philips needs to provide a timeline focused methodology for adding substances for phase out. for overcoming the exemptions on future substance restrictions. List of “relevant” substances. beryllium and to clarify why other Philips statement on RoHS types of phthalates (beyond the Recast. More information. six specified) are not scheduled for elimination. E-Waste Provides info for Use of recycled plastic Provides voluntary Reports on amount of Support for Individual individual customers on content in products - and take-back where e-waste collected and Producer Responsibility take-back in all countries timelines for increasing no EPR laws exist recycled where products are sold content PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) BAD (0) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) BAD (0) BAD (0) Philips supports the principle of It is Philips’ intention to help Philips provides general advice to Philips aims to double the Philips introduced a vacuum Individual Producer Responsibility establish global collection and customers on recycling, contacts collection and recycling of its cleaner which is made with (IPR) at least as far as differentiation recycling systems. for recyclers in most of the EU end-of-life products by 2015. 50% post industrial plastics and is concerned but not as far as More information. (excluding some New Member More information. 25% bio based plastic; the use provisions that avoid the costs Philips has a voluntary take-back States), and a search tool to Philips reports that in 2008 of post consumer plastics is not falling on others. Philips has signed programme in India encompassing locate recyclers courtesy of the the total amount of WEEE mentioned. Philips aims to double the IPR coalition statement and has 8 cities with 27 service centres. Consumer Electronics Association recycled waste in EU countries the amount of recycled materials pledged to actively work towards More information. in the US. was 69,818 tons. It no longer used in Philips products by 2015, developing IPR based recycling Pilot projects have started in More information here and provides details of its recycling however, this is for all materials, systems and their supporting Brazil and Argentina, otherwise, here. rate as a % of past sales. not only plastics. In addition, financial mechanisms. there is no voluntary take-back Good information for More information. as Philips does not report on its More information. For full marks offered by Philips, although in the customers in India. existing use of recycled plastic on IPR Philips needs to document US Philips lists local recyclers for it’s not clear what this target its operationalising of IPR and customers to contact. represents. More information. continue to lobby for IPR, inter More information. alia by ensuring that the revised To regain the lost point, Philips WEEE legislation sets clearer needs to institutionalise the pilot requirements (enforcement criteria) projects and expand its take-back for the implementation of IPR. programme to other countries. It also needs to reject Art 14.2. (continued use of the Visible Fee) of the EC proposal for a revised WEEE Directive. Energy Support for global Company Commitment to Amount of Energy efficiency of mandatory reduction of carbon footprint reduce own direct renewable energy New Models GHG emissions disclosure GHG emissions used (double points) GOOD (3+) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) GOOD (3+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) Philips believes that global Philips discloses its CO2 equivalent Philips is committed to reducing In 2008, Philips doubled its All TVs sold in the US and 90% emissions should peak in 2015 emissions to be 1,920 kt in 2009 its operational carbon footprint by purchase of green electricity from of European models meet Energy and decline thereafter to achieve in its Annual 2009 Report. Some 25% by 2012, using 2007 as a 7% in 2007 to 15% currently. Star v.3. In 2008 all Philips TV a 50-80% cut in 2050. It supports of these emissions are from supply baseline. Overall CO2 emissions By 2012, the number of sites models exceeded the requirement mandatory cuts in domestic chain inbound logistics. However, dropped 10% in 2009 compared that use green electricity should for standby power consumption by emissions in industrialised Philips loses a point as its verification to 2008, with emissions from be raised to the level needed to at least 70%. More information. countries of at least 30% by 2020. is for its Sustainability performance manufacturing decreasing by 6%. achieve the 25% carbon footprint 10% of Philips current battery More information. as a whole and only provides limited More information. reduction target by 2012. For charger models fulfil the Energy assurance; it does not provide See Annual Report for maximum points Philips needs Star v.2 requirements. These external verification using the baseline year (see ‘Improving to increase its purchasing of models exceed the technical methodology for GHG emissions our Footprint’). renewable energy. Philips has Energy Star requirements by according to the GHG protocol. asked its suppliers to introduce 5-15%. Philips could also score more points procedures to avoid double More information. by reporting emissions from a counting of renewable energy second stage of the product supply certificates. More information. chain (scope 3). More information. Data definitions and scope. KPMG verification.
  7. 7. 5 6 P •PHILIPS 4 •SHAR •MOTOROLA ER •AC 7 3 E •LG MSUNG •DELL •APPLE •SO •SA •PANASONIC NY •NO ER 8 2 VO •S O N Y ICS KIA NO SHIB A S 9 1 LE WH O N • O • T O JITSU •HP ND •FU ROSOFT BE O W 10 0 E INT IC F IL T IR L •N •M GR O G ST -- GUIDE TO EE O N? + GREENER ELECTRONICS VERSION 15 greenpeace.org/electronics This Guide ranks leading mobile phone, game console, TV and PC manufacturers on their global policies and practice on eliminating harmful chemicals, taking responsibility for their products MAY 2010 once they are discarded by consumers, and their impact on the climate. Companies are ranked on information that is publicly available and clarifications and communications with the companies. greenpeace.org/electronics MOTOROLA Ranking = 5.1/10 Motorola rises from 7 place to 4 , with the same score of 5.1, as a result of other companies dropping down the ranking. th th Motorola scores relatively well on the chemicals criteria and has a goal to eliminate PVC vinyl plastic and brominated flame retardants (BFRs), though only in mobile devices and not all its products introduced after 2010, despite the fact that Sony Ericsson and Nokia are already there. All of its mobile phones are now PVC-free and it has one PVC and BFR-free mobile phone, the A45 ECO and a couple of models of chargers; for more points Motorola needs to complete the phase out of BFRs in mobile phones and start working on the phase out of PVC and BFRs in its other products. It also fails to support the need for RoHS 2.0 (EU Directive on the Restriction of Hazardous Substances in electronics, currently being revised) to adopt an end-of-life focussed methodology for adding new substances and an immediate ban on organo-chlorine and bromine compounds. Motorola needs to clarify its stance regarding the position of the trade federation TechAmerica on further restrictions and in particular PVC, chlorinated flame retardants (CFRs) and (BFRs) within 3-5 years. Motorola scores fewer points on waste issues, with weak support for the principle of Individual Producer Responsibility for e-waste and no reporting on use of recycled plastic. Motorola scores well for its take-back and recycling service in 72 countries, representing over 90 percent of global mobile phone unit sales, and for providing good information to its individual customers. It reports a global take-back rate of 3 percent of total handsets sold in 2005 but it needs to explain how its EU figures are calculated. The company does relatively well on the energy criteria, scoring points on all the criteria with the exception of support for strict global and industrialised country cuts in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Its reporting of its GHG emissions has external verification, and it gets maximum points on the energy efficiency of its products, reporting that from 1 November 2008, all newly designed Motorola mobile phone chargers meet and exceed by 67 percent the new Energy Star v.2.0 requirements for standby/ no-load modes. It reports that 15 percent of the energy it purchases is from renewable sources, but it includes 5 percent of renewable energy available by default in the power grid in 2009 in this figure. It has a goal to increase the proportion of renewables used, to 20 percent by 2010 and 30 percent by 2020 and commits to absolute cuts of 6 percent in its GHG emissions by 2010, compared with 2000. Note: Motorola has updated some of the information on its website since this assessment was done. MOTOROLA Overall Score BAD (0) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) GOOD (3+) Precautionary Principle and support for revision of RoHS Directive. Chemicals Management Timeline for PVC & BFR phaseout Timeline for additional substances phaseout PVC-free and/or BFR-free models (companies score double on this criterion) Individual producer responsibility Voluntary take-back Information to individual customers Amounts recycled Use of recycled plastic content Global GHG emissions reduction support Carbon Footprint disclosure Own GHG emissions reduction commitment Amounts of renewable energy used Energy efficiency of new models (companies score double on this criterion)
  8. 8. MOTOROLA Detailed Scoring Chemicals Precautionary Principle PVC-free and/or Chemicals Timeline for Timeline for additional and support for revision of BFR-free models RoHS Directive. Management PVC & BFR phaseout substances phaseout (double points) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) GOOD (3+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) Motorola has a definition of the Motorola provides a list of banned Motorola has set a goal to Motorola has set a goal to All mobile phones launched since precautionary principle that and reportable substances in its eliminate PVC and BFRs in all eliminate phthalates in all new 1 January 2009 are now PVC-free. identifies the preventive measures Global Common Specification No. new designs of mobile products designs of mobile phones only, In addition the majority of phones to be taken to eliminate the use 12G02897W18 (updated 15 May only, (not all products) introduced introduced after 2010, with such have rigid printed wiring boards of hazardous substances even 2008) More information. after 2010, with such products products available in 2010. that are BFR-free. In 2009 Motorola when scientific evidence is limited As a pdf. available in 2010. More information. launched its first PVC and BFR free or conflicting. However, Motorola More information. Antimony and compounds and mobile phone, the A45 ECO and makes no mention of the need Beryllium and compounds are chargers. For more points Motorola for RoHS 2.0 to adopt a ban on listed as reportable in Motorola’s needs to complete the phase out organo- chlorine and bromine list of banned and reportable of BFRs in mobile phones. It also compounds (at least PVC, CFRs, substances. More information. needs to start working on the phase and BFRs within 3-5 years), as out of PVC and BFRs in its other well as an end-of-life focused products, including home network methodology for adding future equipment (e.g. set top boxes, substance restrictions. wireless routers). More information. Motorola More information. also needs to clarify its stance in Product Eco Facts for the MOTO relation to the position of the trade W233 Renew are here. federation TechAmerica on further restrictions and in particular PVC, CFRs and BFRs within 3-5 years. E-Waste Provides info for Use of recycled plastic Provides voluntary Reports on amount of Support for Individual individual customers on content in products - and take-back where e-waste collected and Producer Responsibility take-back in all countries timelines for increasing no EPR laws exist recycled where products are sold content PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) BAD (0) Motorola supports Individual Motorola offers recycling services Information is provided to Motorola’s global take-back rate Motorola is increasing the Producer Responsibility, but in 72 countries, representing over individual customers in the for 2008 was an estimated 2.5% proportion of recycled materials there is no reference to the need 90% of global mobile phone unit countries where Motorola offers of mobile phones sold in 2006 used in its products, although no for brand differentiation and no sales. Motorola also operates voluntary programmes. However, (compared to 3% in 2007); it did quantities are given. evidence of active lobbying for take-back services for network information for customers in not achieve its goal to increase the More information. IPR. Motorola needs to clarify equipment, on request. In the US countries such as Singapore collection of e-waste by 5%. 25% of the housing of the MOTO that its support of IPR means it is now taking back modems, could be improved. For some Although Motorola provides the W233 Renew is made using it supports differentiated/ routers and cordless phones. countries, e.g. Nigeria, South source of data for calculation, there plastics comprised of recycled individualised financing for More information here Africa, Motorola provides only is no explanation of how EU figures water bottles. own-brand real end-of-life costs and here. one to three drop off locations, were calculated. To increase its More information. (e.g. no longer collective financing Motorola has established a with no telephone or email score Motorola has to provide EU such as market share but instead take-back programme for US information. Motorola also takes figures from own brand sampling more real and individualised business customers for radios, back network equipment if of return rate, undertaken in at financing such as return share) mobile computers, barcode requested by customers. least one Northern EU country, for new WEEE. scanners, imagers, in-vehicle More information. one Southern EU country and one More information. mobile workstations, accessories, Motorola’s take-back programme new Member State country – and network infrastructure equipment for modems and routers, which provide indications of how it intends and computers, laptops and also links to cordless phones. to expand this sampling in the monitors. More information. More information. future. More information. Energy Support for global Company Commitment to Amount of Energy efficiency of mandatory reduction of carbon footprint reduce own direct renewable energy New Models GHG emissions disclosure GHG emissions used (double points) BAD (0) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) GOOD (3+) Motorola supports global Motorola calculates that in 2008, As a founding member of the Currently about 15 percent of From 1 November 2008, 100% of mandatory greenhouse gas its carbon footprint (scope 1 and Chicago Climate Exchange Motorola’s electricity is purchased newly designed Motorola mobile emission reductions by at 2 emissions from the Greenhouse (CCX), a voluntary emissions- from renewable sources, with a phone chargers meet the new ES2 least 50 percent below 1990 Gas Protocol) totalled 531,661 reduction program, Motorola goal to increase this to 20% by requirements and exceed by 67% levels by 2050. Motorola needs tonnes CO2 equivalent, compared has committed to a 6 percent 2010 and 30% by 2020. Currently, the requirements for standby/no- commitments to short term to 671,791 tonnes in 2005. But reduction in its absolute 20% of its U.S. electricity is from load modes. All of Motorola’s newly targets: to call for global GHG there is no data about product greenhouse gas emissions by renewable sources; renewable designed chargers meet the new emissions to peak by 2015 and supply chain emissions. 2010, compared with 2000. energy certificates are purchased EU CoC target of 0.25 watts for for industrialised countries as a More information. More information. from NativeEnergy. Its 15% figure standby power. group to accept mandatory cuts Motorola’s 2007 emissions are includes 5% RE from the power More information. of at least 30% by 2020. reported annually, audited and grid, with about 10% from voluntary More information. verified by the Financial Industry purchases, including renewable Regulatory Authority, through the energy certificates from wind Chicago Climate Exchange. power in the US and hydro power in More information. Germany. More information. Information on fuel cell base stations, wind and solar powered base stations.
  9. 9. 5 6 P •PHILIPS 4 •SHAR •MOTOROLA ER •AC 7 3 E •LG MSUNG •DELL •APPLE •SO • SA •PANASONIC NY •NO 8 ER 2 VO •S O N Y ICS KIA NO SHIB A S 9 1 LE WH O N • O • T O JITSU •HP ND •FU ROSOFT BE O W 10 0 E INT IC F IL T IR L •N •M GR O G ST -- GUIDE TO EE O N? + GREENER ELECTRONICS VERSION 15 greenpeace.org/electronics This Guide ranks leading mobile phone, game console, TV and PC manufacturers on their global policies and practice on eliminating harmful chemicals, taking responsibility for their products MAY 2010 once they are discarded by consumers, and their impact on the climate. Companies are ranked on information that is publicly available and clarifications and communications with the companies. greenpeace.org/electronics APPLE Ranking = 4.9/10 Apple remains in 5th place, with a slightly reduced score of 4.9, down from 5.1 points in version 14. It loses a point for lack of transparency in its reporting on its use of renewable energy. Apple does best on the toxic chemicals criteria, where it scores most of its points. All Apple products are now free of PVC vinyl plastic and brominated flame retardants (BFRs), with the exception of PVC-free power cords in countries where their safety certification process is still ongoing. For this Apple continues to score full marks (doubled). Apple scores points for its chemicals policy informed by the precautionary principle and for lobbying the EU institutions for a ban on PVC, chlorinated flame retardants and BFRs during the current revision of the EU’s RoHS Directive (Restriction of Hazardous Substances in electronics), but for full marks it needs to provide a public position on its support for immediate restrictions in RoHS 2.0 on organo- chlorine and bromine compounds. It also needs to clarify its stance regarding the position of the trade federation TechAmerica on further immediate restrictions and in particular PVC and BFRs. Apple scores only one point on information about its management of chemicals and its supply chain communications; this criterion evaluates disclosure of information flow in the supply chain. Apple also continues to score poorly for the minimal information it provides about its future toxic chemical phase-out plans. It scores substantially less on the e-waste criteria than on toxic chemicals. Apple has improved coverage of its take-back programme with take-back and recycling services now extended to the Asia-Pacific region, including India, China, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore, New Zealand, Korea and Australia. It reports a 2008 recycling rate (as a percentage of sales seven years ago) of 41.9 percent, up from 38 percent in 2007 and 18 percent in 2006; however, it needs to provide details on how this is calculated. Apple has set a goal of achieving a 50 percent recycling rate by 2010. On the energy criteria, Apple discloses full product lifecycle emissions, including supply chain and reports on the amount of CO2-equivalent emissions saved through use of renewable energy (RE) in 2008. However, Apple loses a point as this provides no indication of the amount of RE used as a portion of Apple’s electricity use, which depends on the fossil fuel source displaced by this RE use. Apple scores a point for reporting that its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions were reduced by 3 percent year over year from 2006 to 2007. Despite having left the US Chamber of Commerce over differences in climate policy, it is disappointing that Apple has yet to make a statement on the need for mandatory reduction of GHG emissions. Its score on the energy efficiency of its products would improve if it provided data on what proportion of its products exceeds the latest Energy Star standards and by how much. APPLE Overall Score BAD (0) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) GOOD (3+) Precautionary Principle and support for revision of RoHS Directive. Chemicals Management Timeline for PVC & BFR phaseout Timeline for additional substances phaseout PVC-free and/or BFR-free models (companies score double on this criterion) Individual producer responsibility Voluntary take-back Information to individual customers Amounts recycled Use of recycled plastic content Global GHG emissions reduction support Carbon Footprint disclosure Own GHG emissions reduction commitment Amounts of renewable energy used Energy efficiency of new models (companies score double on this criterion)

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