Solar energy market overview nov 25 2011_eng_final
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Solar energy market overview nov 25 2011_eng_final

on

  • 1,272 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,272
Views on SlideShare
1,272
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
15
Comments
1

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel

11 of 1

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • I will like to learn more about solar energy I know its from the sun I will like to know the science behind it
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Solar energy market overview nov 25 2011_eng_final Solar energy market overview nov 25 2011_eng_final Document Transcript

    •   European‐Ukrainian Energy Agency           Market Overview   Ukraine’s Solar Energy: Current Status      prepared with support of Rentechno Company      Kyiv, November 2011  www.euea‐energyagency.org 
    • Table of contents  BACKGROUND ....................................................................................................................................................    4CURRENT STATUS ...............................................................................................................................................    4LEGISLATION .......................................................................................................................................................    4Green tariff (GT): ................................................................................................................................................    4Local component: ...............................................................................................................................................    5Taxation: .............................................................................................................................................................    6Electricity grids: ..................................................................................................................................................    6Poor project development: .................................................................................................................................    6Infrastructure......................................................................................................................................................    7INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK ............................................................................................................................    7National Electricity Regulatory Commission of Ukraine (NERC) ........................................................................    7State Agency on energy efficiency and energy saving of Ukraine (NAER) .........................................................    8Energy Community Treaty ..................................................................................................................................    8KEY MARKET PLAYERS ........................................................................................................................................    9PJSC “Semiconductor Plant”  ..............................................................................................................................    . 9JSC Pillar  .............................................................................................................................................................    . 9Silicon  LLC ........................................................................................................................................................  0  1PJSC “KVAZAR” .................................................................................................................................................  0  1Activ Solar .........................................................................................................................................................  0  1RENTECHNO .....................................................................................................................................................  1  1MANAGESS AG .................................................................................................................................................  2  1SUNELECTRA .....................................................................................................................................................  3  1Schneider Electric .............................................................................................................................................  3  1Solarig ...............................................................................................................................................................  4  1 FUNDING FOR PV PLANTS ................................................................................................................. 14    1 
    • EXPERT OPINIONS ............................................................................................................................................  5  1 Appendix I .......................................................................................................................................... 19  Appendix II ......................................................................................................................................... 20                     2 
    •  Dear colleagues,  Given the rapid development of Ukraine’s renewable energy market in the past two years and high activity in the solar power market segment, we decided to share with all of you the brief overview of the Solar Energy Market in Ukraine. During the past months we have witnessed number of small and medium  size  players  establishing  activities  in  Ukraine  and  exploring  the  project  development opportunities.  Whereas  there  are  numerous  challenges  to  overcome,  European‐Ukrainian  Energy Agency  does  see  a  huge  potential  in  solar  PV  development  in  projects  between  1‐10  MW  and  will actively  contribute  to  market  growth,  promote  fair  rules  of  the  game  for  all  stakeholders, transparency in energy sector and more secure investment climate.  This overview highlights some of the most active players on the market at this stage, and even we have not been able to identify all of you yet, we will be happy to include the information about your plans and projects in our further updates of this market overview. Please, contact us any time!  Special thanks to Rentechno Company for support in the report preparations and we look forward to hearing more news from all you!  We hope you find this information useful!  Sincerely,  Dave Young Chairman, European‐Ukrainian Energy Agency      European‐Ukrainian  Energy  Agency  (EUEA)  ‐  is  a  non‐profit  Association  founded in Kyiv in 2009 with the goal to establish a solid platform for joint EU‐ Ukrainian  actions  to  create  sustainable  society,  support  the  efficient  use  of  energy resources as well as promote the energy friendly technology transfer.  EUEA  aims  to  address  the  issues  of  energy  efficiency  and  development  of  renewable energy sector at each stage of the energy chain, (from generation  to  consumption,  including  transport)  by  providing  up‐to‐date  information,  promoting  adoption  of  EU  legislation  and  standards  in  Ukraine  as  well  as  initiating  and  supporting  projects  at  the  initial  stages.  Today  EUEA  brings  together  the  key  stakeholders  within  the  areas  of  energy  efficiency  in  buildings  and  district  heating  systems,  biomass,  biogas,  wind  energy  and project financing. Among the priority issues for EUEA is also Ukraine’s fulfilment of the obligations in frames of the Energy Community Treaty.  www.euea‐energyagency.org    3 
    • BACKGROUND The geography of Ukraine shows a great potential for the solar energy market development, thus the potential  of  solar  energy  in  Ukraine  is  high  enough  for  the  wide  application  of  solar  equipment (please, see Appendix I and Appendix II). The incidence of solar radiation increases from northwest (1070 kW/m2) to southeast (1440 kW/m2) with the highest potential on the Crimean peninsula. The time period for the efficient usage of solar collectors in the southern regions of Ukraine is 7 months (from April to October), in the northern regions ‐ 5 months (from May to September). Photovoltaic equipment  can  operate  effectively  during  the  year.  Currently  solar  collectors  for  water  heating  are widely implemented in the southern part of Ukraine and their volume is growing.  According  to  National  Agency  for  Energy  Saving  and  Energy  Efficiency  (former  NAER)  the  solar potential of Ukraine is much higher than that of Germany and it is technically possible that the share of  solar  energy  will  reach  10%  of  Ukraine’s  energy  balance  till  2030.  Despite  the  fact  that  the equipment  for  generation  of  solar  energy  is  still  quite  expensive,  the  world  experiences  a  trend  of decreasing production costs of such equipment.     CURRENT STATUS According  to  EBRD,  Ukraine  appears  to  be  ready  to  become  a  leader  in  Europe’s  clean  energy economy soon, especially with regard to the solar energy market which seems to be one of the most perspective markets of the renewable energy. Currently, Ukraine became a host for the biggest solar‐power  plant  in  Europe  and  it  is  projected  that  solar  energy  market  of  Ukraine  will  grow  by  90% annually  until  2015.  Ukraine  has  all  the  prerequisites  for  the  successful  development  of  the  solar energy market: high indicator of DNI (Direct Normal Irradiance), high feed‐in “green” tariff, possibility to use JI under the Kyoto Protocol for solar power projects and favorable tax exemption provisions. Additionally, Ukrainian energy strategy aims to grow up to 20% of energy from renewable sources by 2020 and Ukrainian feed‐in tariff for alternative energy is nearly twice as of some G8 members.    LEGISLATION Over the last couple of years Ukraine has been quite ambitious about its alternative energy policies: Verkhovna  Rada  of  Ukraine  adopted  the  Law  “On  Introduction  of  the  Amendments  to  the  Law  of Ukraine “On Electric Energy” in Respect of the Incentives for Use of Alternative Sources of Energy” on April  1,  2009  and  in  August  2010  Viktor  Yanukovych,  President  of  Ukraine,  committed  that  the construction of wind and solar power plants will be among ten priority national projects. Such rapid changes and ambitious declarations should have caused aggressive development and Ukrainian solar market should have been flourishing by now. However, in practice, the legislature provisions appear to be not sufficient enough to make investors put their money in extremely capital‐intensive projects in  solar  energy.  Legislative  instability  is  the  first  and  the  most  striking  challenge  for  the  foreign investors.   Green  tariff  (GT):  Ukraine’s  renewable  energy  market  looks  very  promising,  especially  with  the adoption  of  feed‐in  tariff  as  incentive  for  solar  energy  which  is  among  highest  in  Europe.  It  was introduced to Ukraine in 2009 as the stimulation to use alternative energy sources and is designed to be  valid  till  2030.  During  this  time  period  the  state  made  it  mandatory  for  power  companies  to connect alternative energy facilities to the electricity grid. The tariff is tied to EUR currency in order to  secure  foreign  investors  from  local  currency  fluctuations.    The  green  tariff  is  regulated  on  a    4 
    • monthly  basis  by  the  National  Electricity  Regulatory  Commission  (NERC).  As  of  October  2011,  the tariff for solar power generation was 512.38 kopeeks/kWh (EUR  0.465 per kWh).   Ever  since  it’s  adoption,  the  law  has  been  actively  discussed,  and  often  criticized  by  the  local  and international  community.  Though,  it  has  always  been  clearly  stated  by  the  authorities,  that  the procedure  of  receiving  GT  is  established  by  law,  and  if  followed,  there  are  no  risks  of  receiving  a negative answer. As of May 2011, 45 companies in Ukraine were awarded green‐tariff preferences.  One of the key concerns of foreign investors that still remains is the absence of cost reimbursement procedure  when connecting to the grid. The wind project developers are mostly concerned with the stage  at  which  the  GT  is  awarded.  According  to  the  law,  it  is  established  when  the  object  is  being connected to the grid (after the finalization of construction), which obviously carries some risks for investors.  The  security  of  GT  being  guaranteed  until  2030  also  raises  several  concerns,  especially given the experience of Germany and Czech Republic.   One of the governments priorities in the electricity sector is to reform the market in order to exclude the  wholesale  market  from  electricity  transactions  between  generators  and  distributors,  thereby enabling  parties  to  enter  into  power  supply  transactions  directly.  However,  the  end  result  of  the electricity reform ‐ the liquidation of the wholesale market ‐ may be unattractive to companies that are  willing  to  operate  under  the  green  tariff,  as  presently  the  wholesale  market  provides  the  only mechanism  for  the  state  to  purchase  alternative  energy  on  this  green  tariff  basis.  In  order  to preserve  the  implementation  of  the  tariff,  the  law  declares  that  the  states  obligation  to  purchase alternative  energy  at  green  tariff  rates  will  survive  the  reform.  However,  if  the  wholesale  energy market is liquidated, it is unclear how the green tariff will be implemented.  In general, the “green” tariff was meant to become the main instrument for implementing the state target economic energy efficiency and renewable energy program in 2010–2015. The program was approved  by  the  Cabinet  of  Ministers  in  March  2010  and  originally  supposed  a  proportion  of renewable  energy  in  the  total  electricity  demand  to  be  no  less  than  5%  by  2015.  In  April  2011  the Program was revised, and the target increased to 10%. According to the new version of the program, the  projected  funding  will  amount  to  UAH  347.8  bln  ($43.5  bln),  including  28.8  bln  UAH  ($3.6  bln) from  various  levels  of  budgets.  Public  funds  will  be  spent  on  construction  and  reconstruction  of electric  grid  and  substations  for  connecting  new  power  facilities.    Despite  the  introduction  of  the "green" tariff, according to the Ministry of Energy, the share of renewable energy in total electricity production has been declining for the second year in a row. Thus, in January 2010, the share of the alternative electricity in total energy production in the country was 2.4% (including big hydropower plants),  by  September  of  this  year,  it  dropped  to  1.4%.  This  phenomenon  may  be  associated  with complexity of projects implementation.  Local component: Another challenge, , is the so‐called local component. Thus, according to the law, starting  January  1,  2012  the  share  of  raw  materials,  plant  and  equipment,  works  and  services  of Ukrainian  origin  in  the  construction  cost  of  the  corresponding  power  generation  facility  producing electricity  from  alternative  energy  sources  must  be  at  least  15%  ‐  starting  from  January  1,  30%  ‐ starting from January 1, 2013, and 50% ‐ starting from January 1, 2014, respectively. As of January 1, 2013, to obtain a “green tariff” for electricity generated with the use of solar radiation, solar modules must be used, with the share of raw materials of Ukrainian origin in the production cost making at least  30%  and  at  least  50%  starting  from  January  1,  2014.  However,  the  exact  procedure  of calculating  the  Ukrainian  component,  is  still  under  development  by  National  Electricity  Regulatory Commission  of  Ukraine  (NERC).  Moreover,  worldwide  experience  shows  that  before  such  “local component”  introduction,  the  local  environment  shall  provide  at  least  the  availability  of  large  and stable  domestic  market  and  functioning  of  clear  and  consistent  legislation  governing  this  sector. Otherwise, this condition can significantly slow down the progress in the construction of new stations    5 
    • due  to  the  shortage  of  Ukrainian  production  capacities.  Since  there  are  very  few  manufacturers  of such  equipment  in  Ukraine,  such  quotas  should  not  apply  at  all  in  order  not  to  stop  the  market development.  On  the  other  hand,  if  this  condition  is  kept,  it  may  bring  massive  investments  in photovoltaic production chain of Ukraine. There has been an on going debate between the market players in regards to how fair is the “local component requirement” and if it contradicts the WTO and Energy  Community  Treaty,  which  Ukraine  joined  in  February  2012.  So  far  the  local  content requirement  has  been  changed  and  once  postponed  due  to  inability  to  secure  the  local  supply  in needed  quantities,  and  relevant  stakeholders  are  continuously  brining  the  need  to  soften requirement to Ukrainian authorities.  Taxation: The New Tax Code that was adopted in December 2010 aims to create favorable conditions for the “green” energy boom.  It anticipates income tax (corporate profit tax) exemptions from the profits  of  electricity  produced  from  renewable  sources  up  to  2020.  Under  the  Act  158  of  the  Tax Code,  50%  of  profits  earned  from  the  energy  efficient  operations  and  implementation  of  energy efficient projects of companies included in the State Agency on Energy Efficiency and Energy Saving (NAER) registry, shall be exempt from the profit tax. However, this procedure has been ineffective so far as the NAER’s list contains only 2 companies: Semiconductor Plant OJSC (Active Solar subsidiary) and  Kvazar  PJSC  (Kyiv).  The  producers  shall  invest  the  funds,  saved  on  the  exemption,  for  target programs  that  is  rather  difficult  to  monitor.  Additionally,  in  July  2010  the  Parliament  adopted  the Law “On Land for Energy Facilities and Legal Regime of Special Zones of Energy Objects”, under which the land rent for renewable energy facilities is reduced by 70%. As  the  import  of  solar  power  equipment  is  the  most  feasible  and  less  expensive  way  to  construct solar power plants, it still makes investors face customs clearance problems.  According to the new Tax  Code  that  was  introduced  in  2011,  other  preferences  towards  renewable  energy  development include  duty‐free  imports  and  exemptions  from  value‐added  taxes  provided  that  the  relevant products are not manufactured in Ukraine. However, an importer should undergo the procedure of import approval with the Ministry of Economic Development and Trade, which upon proposals of the central  executive  authorities  shall  draft  the  resolution  to  be  made  by  the  Cabinet  of  Ministers  of Ukraine  on  introduction  of  the  relevant  amendments  into  the  List  of  Equipment,  which  shall  be exempt from the import duty and VAT and on inclusion of an individual batch of such equipment into the List and shall duly send the same for consideration to the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine, which shall make its special resolution to that effect then.  Electricity grids: Proper legislation is  missing yet in the part of solar power plants connecting to the grid.  The  pending  question  to  be  solved  in  the  nearest  future  is  the  development  of  a  single procedure for reimbursement by the state of expenses incurred by investor for the construction or modernization of those parts of the electric grid to be transferred to the grid operators. The 20‐25 year term, which is offered to offset  the costs of connection, is  not justified.  NERC should  develop and adopt a single procedure for connecting solar energy facilities to grid and include the expenses into  the  investment  programs  approval  for  local  operators.  Furthermore,  the  lack  of  practical experience in technical documentation preparation for grid‐connection of PV systems is an obstacle as well. Poor project development: Availability of well prepared projects is a priority condition precedent to market development; however another problem in Ukraine regarding renewable energy sector is the lack  of  Western  approach  to  project  preparation,  understanding  all  their  options.  As  EBRD experience says, around 30 % of local developers or projects submit unprepared projects or unable to provide proper funding. Also, there is little understanding of such parameters as cash flow, NPV, payback period and general project management. Many applications are based on unjustified, non‐commercial technologies.    6 
    • Infrastructure: When talking about investment and new sector development, it is worth mentioning the financial infrastructure to facilitate this process. So far, Ukrainian banks are not ready to support projects based on project finance schemes as they used to work with the corporate sector, making available simple loans mostly secured by pledges.  Therefore, time is needed for banks and project managers to reach understanding of this market. Nowadays, EBRD is helping to finance such projects, though  at  least  30%  of  the  project  has  to  be  financed  from  other  sources,  which  also  causes complications for local developers. The  other  challenge  that  may  be  faced  by  the  investors  is  the  absence  of  public  awareness  and interest in renewable energy prospects. The evidence of such attitude is the fact that 90% of solar modules  produced  in  Ukraine  are  exported  to  European  countries,  but  again  this  is  mostly  due  to nonexistent (until recently) solar energy market.   Moreover,  investors  hardly  believe  that  the  government  of  Ukraine  or  National  Commission  for Electricity Regulation (NERC), which is a local market regulator, clearly understands how the “green” tariff system  would function in the bilateral agreements environment and  market  balancing, which Ukraine has committed to transition by the end of 2014. Despite the laws giving financial breaks and preferences to the companies, Ukraine appears to be a high‐potential  emerging  market  with  an  extremely  high  investment  appeal  of  a  “green”  tariff  for solar  energy  that  makes  investors  risk  and  find  their  solutions  to  cope  with  all  mentioned  above complications.  While  this  segment  of  alternative  energy  is  at  the  initial  stage  of  development  in Ukraine, the country envisages a favorable situation for solar energy sector expansion. Beyond any doubts, the Ukrainian solar energy market is slowly, but successfully progressing further and will start showing positive developments very soon.    INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK In  August  2010,  President  Viktor  Yanukovych  assigned  a  decree  to  Prime‐Ministrer  Mykola  Azarov that supposes the Prime‐Minister to assure amendments to the State Target Economic Program on energy  efficiency  and  development  of  energy  production  from  renewable  energy  sources  and alternative  fuels.  The  government  is  expected  to  develop  additional  measures  to  stimulate production of energy from alternative sources, so that renewable energy share in the energy balance of  Ukraine  increases  to  10%  until  2015.  (Right  now,  if  omitting  hydropower,  the  renewable  energy sources amount to less than 1% in the energy balance).  There are two key governmental authorities influencing the solar energy sector and are important for any  incoming  investor:  National  Electricity  Regulatory  Commission  of  Ukraine  (NERC)  and  State Agency on energy efficiency and energy saving of Ukraine (NAER).  National Electricity Regulatory Commission of Ukraine (NERC) The main objectives of NERC are to participate in  the forming and implementation of unified state policy  for  development  and  operation  of  wholesale  electricity  markets  for  the  heat  produced  by cogeneration  plants  and  plants  using  alternative  or  renewable  energy  sources  and  promote competition  in  the  production  of  electricity  from  the  heat  produced  by  cogeneration  plants  and plants  using  alternative  or  renewable  energy.  It  also  provides  the  pricing  and  tariff  policy  for electricity  and  heat  produced  in  cogeneration  plants  and  plants  using  alternative  or  renewable    7 
    • energy  sources  and  issues  licenses  to  businesses  in  the  area  of  heat  if  the  heat  is  produced  for cogeneration,  cogeneration  plants  and  plants  using  alternative  or  renewable  energy  sources. National Commission on Regulation of the Utility Services Market of Ukraine is being established on the basis of NERC to create two separate independent regulators in the electricity and heating sector.  State Agency on energy efficiency and energy saving of Ukraine (NAER) NAER is the central governmental body responsible for State policy on energy efficiency and energy conservation in Ukraine. The main tasks of NAER are to carry out unified state policy in the sphere of efficient  use  of  energy  recourses  and  energy‐saving;  approve  energy  saving  and  energy  efficient projects which are requiring financing from state budget and monitor their implementation; create state  system  for  monitoring  production,  consumption,  export  and  import  of  energy  carriers, improvement  of  system  of  calculation  and  control  of  energy  carriers  consumption  and  provide functioning  of  unified  system  for  regulation  of  considerable  expenditures  of  energy  recourses  in budget sphere.  NAER is a central coordinating body for most of international relations in the energy sector, including representation to the Energy Community, cooperation with the EU delegation, cooperation with the EU  energy  agencies  and  business.  NAER  is  responsible  for  establishment  and  preparation  of proposals about attraction of foreign investments in the sphere of energy efficiency and renewable sources.  Also,  until  recently  NAER  was  one  of  the  key  government  bodies  for  initiating  the  legal initiatives  and  prior  to  administrative  reform  was  directly  supplying  draft  laws  to  the  Cabinet  of Ministers  of Ukraine.  Now,  it  is  part of  the  Ministry  of  Economy  and  legal  initiatives  are  subject  to approval by the Ministry first.   Energy Community Treaty  On February 1, 2011 Ukraine became a member of the Energy Community. Negotiations on Ukraine’s accession to the Energy Community lasted for about 2 years. Starting from November 2006, Ukraine was  an  observer  of  the  said  organization.  The  decision  on  acceptance  of  Ukraine  to  the  Energy Community  was  adopted  on  18  December  2009  at  the  meeting  of  the  Community’s  Council  of Ministers in Zagreb. The Countries of the Energy Community put forward a number of conditions for Ukraine’s  entry.  First,  Ukraine  was  to  improve  the  nuclear  safety  of  its  nuclear  power  plants  in accordance with the IAEA requirements, and, secondly, to conduct a series of legislative reforms in the gas sector, i.e. to bring them into conformity with the norms of EC directives. Ukraine performed two of the conditions and, thus, implemented a joint project of the European Commission and the IAEA  on  nuclear  safety  and  the  adoption  of  Law  of  Ukraine  “On  the  principles  of  the  natural  gas market functioning”, which complies with the European gas directives (Directive 2003/55/EC and EC Regulation 1775/2005).  For Ukraine, it means the must to implement the EC energy legislation with the boundary terms set for  that  purpose.  The  European  Commission  plans  to  evaluate  the  performance  of  Ukraine  of  its commitments  and  the  implementation  of  energy  legislation.  The  terms  set  for  implementation thereof  are  quite  short.  Ukraine  is  obliged  to  apply  eight  of  the  EC  acts  as  early  as  January  2012. These are, in the first place, the “Gas” Directive 2004/76/EC on measures to ensure the security of natural gas supply, and two directives on electricity (Directive 2003/54/EC on common rules for the functioning of the internal electricity market, Directive 2005/89/EС on activities to ensure the safety of investing in energy supply systems and infrastructure). To implement the directives in the field of environmental protection the Protocol of Accession to the agreement provides for a longer term.      8 
    • In summer 2011 Ukraine presented an action plant on implementation Directive 2001/77/EC of the European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  27  September  2011  on  the  promotion  of  electricity produced  from  renewable  energy  sources  in  the  internal  electricity  market.  The  road  map  for  the implementation is currently in process.     KEY MARKET PLAYERS Manufacturers The  introduction  of  “green”  tariff  became  a  powerful  stimulus  to  the  development  of  industrial photovoltaic  generation  in  Ukraine.  Solar  energy  production  chain  is  between  players:  monosilikon manufacturers,  polysilikon  manufacturers  and  producers  of  ingots,  wafers,  solar  cells,  modules. Active  Ukrainian  producers  of  monosilicon  ingots,  wafers,  solar  cells  and  solar  modules  are  CJSC Pillar, Prolog Semikor LLC and Silicon LLC.    PJSC “Semiconductor Plant”    Ukraine  used  to  be  a  major  semiconductor  market  producer  supplying up to 5% of world’s polysilikon demand. Though after the  collapse  of  Soviet  Union  only  Semiconductor  Plant  in  Zaporizhya  sustained and in 2008 the plant was bought by Activ Solar (Austria).  Since  then,  EUR  300  million  has  been  invested  into  the  modernization  of  the  equipment,  which  allowed  open  a  polysilicon  plant  with  a  capacity  of  2500  tons  per  year  in  October  2010.  Today  the  plant  is  the  only  polysilicon  production  facility  in  Ukraine.  Activ Solar has plans to expand the capacity to 3800 tonnes by the end of 2011. The total investment in the project until 2017 is estimated at UAH 11.2 billion ($1.4 billion).  The market of monosilicon and wafer production is represented among four companies: Kvazar PJSC, Pillar  CJSC,  Prolog  Semikor  LLC,  Silicon  LLC.  Due  to  the  absence  of  domestic  polysilicon,  these companies are forced to import silicon scrap as a raw material.  In 2010, import of silicon feedstock in the form of scrap and ingots was 902.1 tons to the total amount of $33.9 million.      JSC Pillar  www.pillar.kiev.ua    The  main  recipient  of  silicon  raw  materials  was  Pillar  CJSC, which  works  on  a  tolling  scheme  (simultaneously  the  largest  exporter  of  ingots  and  wafers).  The company  accounted  for  89%  of  supplies,  its  main  trading  partners  were  Hemlock  Semiconductors and Q‐Cells. Export of silicon feedstock in the form of scrap, ingots and wafers in 2010 amounted to 349.3 tons to the total amount of $18.3 million. The principal exporters of feedstock from Ukraine in 2010  were  Pillar  CJSC  ($16.0  million,  supplies  to  Germany  and  Spain,  work  using  customer  owned raw  materials)  and  Prolog  Semikor  LLC  ($2.3  million,  supplies  to  Japan,  Switzerland  and  other countries).       9 
    •    Silicon  LLC  www.sil.com.ua     Founded  in  April  2002  as  a  state‐owned  Plant  of  Pure  Metals  (JSC  "Pure  Metals").  Plant  of  Pure  Metals  was  founded  in  1962  as  a  specialized  company  for  manufacture  of  semiconductor  materials,  and  until  the  late  1990s the company took the place of one of the leading companies in the  semiconductor  industry  of  the  former  Soviet  Union.  It  produces  single  monosilicon used as a base material for various semiconductor devices, as well as the basic material for the manufacture of photovoltaic cells (solar cells).    PJSC “KVAZAR” www.kvazar.com  Is  the  largest  and  the  only  manufacturer  of  photovoltaic  cells,  solar  modules  and  solar  systems  in  Ukraine.  As  the  factory  of semi‐conductor devices it was established as far back as 1961. The enterprise used to be a part of the military‐industrial complex of the former Soviet Union. In March, 1994 it was transformed into PJSC “Kvazar”. The company possesses the complete infrastructure, beginning from research activities and technological  elaboration  up  to  industrial  manufacture.  The  structure  of  “Kvazar”  represents  a holding  company,  which  consists  of  the  several  subsidiaries:  manufacture  of  components  for  solar energy; elaboration and manufacture of solar systems and manufacture of integrated circuits.  The  potential  capacity  of  the  company  is  20  MW  of  solar  cells  and  10‐12  MW  of  modules.  The company’s modules are certified for use in the EU: in 2008 a station with a capacity of 2.88 MW was built in Cordoba (Spain) on the basis of these modules, a station with a capacity of 2.4 MW in Viterbo (Italy)  in  2010.  Kvazar  PJSC  accounted  for  99.6%  of  exports  of  solar  cells  and  modules  in  2010  for total of $13.3 million. The main recipient ($9.2 million) was Solar Swiss (Switzerland). Kvazar intends to expand the output  of solar cells to 60 MW. The new  market participants include the project of Misto Service, which in 2010 signed a thin‐film amorphous silicon module production line supply agreement with BudaSolar Technologies (Hungary). In early 2011, a delay in the supply of equipment was reported.  Technology Providers  ACTIV SOLAR  www.activsolar.com   Is  an  Austrian  company  focused  on  the  development  and  manufacture of solar based technology. The companys main business  areas  include  production  of  silicon  products  and  development  of  large‐scale  photovoltaic  installations.  Activ  Solar  develops  finances and realizes large‐scale solar energy projects combining world‐class expertise, strategic partnerships with  cutting  edge  technology  and  sustainably  grows  into  a  fully‐integrated  solar  energy  platform. This company is among the few to supply environmental‐friendly electricity at preferential prices.    10 
    • Having  successfully  completed  the  commissioning  of  solar  power  capacity  of  7.5  megawatts  in  the village Rodnikovoye (Crimea, Simferopol district), Activ Solar has announced the construction of an  80  megawatt  (MW)  solar  photovoltaic  (PV)  power  station  located  in  Ohotnikovo (Crimea, Ukraine).  The  plant  is  one  of  largest  on  the  European  continent.  It  is  the  largest  ground‐mounted installation ever built  in  the  region  and  ranks  4th  in  the  world  according  to  the  Large‐Scale  Photovoltaic  Power  Plants  rating  Top  50! The project is divided into four 20  MW  phases,  the  first  of  which  was  grid‐connected  in  July  2011  and  the  fourth  last  phase  was  completed  in October  2011.  The  solar  power  plant  now  consists  of  approximately  360,000  modules,  ground‐mounted  over  an  area  of  160  hectares,  approximately  the  size  of  207  football  fields.  The  plant  is estimated to produce 100,000 megawatt hours of electricity per annum – enough to supply 20,000 households  with  green  energy,  representing  savings  of  up  to  80,000  metric  tons  of  carbon  dioxide emissions per year.    In  November  2011  Activ  Solar  announced  the  completion  of  Phase  III  of  the  Perovo  Solar  Power  Station.  Just  weeks  after  the  launch  of  Phase  II,  the  latest  segment  adds  an  additional 20 megawatts (MW) to the  project  totalling  60  MW  to  date.  Phase  I,  II  &  III  are  estimated  to  produce  approximately  78,500  megawatt  hours  of  electricity  per  annum  ‐  enough  to  meet  the  electricity  needs  of  approximately  16,500  households  and  representing carbon emissions savings of up to 63,000 metric tons per year. The ground‐mounted arrays of all 3 phases  consist  of  over  264,000  mono  and  multicrystalline  photovoltaic  modules  and  80  central inverter stations. The project has created over 800 construction jobs in the region.      RENTECHNO www.rentechno.com.ua  Is one of the leaders in the implementation of integrated  engineering  solutions  using  energy‐efficient  technologies and renewable energy sources. The companys headquarters is located in Kiev (Ukraine). History of the  company  started  in  2009  by  initiation  of  some  investment  projects  in  Ukraine  related  to  the photovoltaic components manufacturing and solar power projects development under the SolarUA brand.     11 
    • In September 2011 Rentechno already announced about the successful completion and putting into operation  the  first  turn  of  solar  power  plant  in  the  southern  part  of  Vinnitsa  region.  The  installed equipment rated peak power amounts 250 kW; the PV panels used in the project were produced by the company which is among top 5 best manufacturers in the world, the inverters, combiner boxes and  cables  for  the  solar  power  plant  were  produced  in  Europe.  Rentechno  itself  developed engineering solution for the solar power plant, implemented the selection and organized delivery of the equipment. All the technical inspections of the installation process and commissioning works of the project were carried out by Rentechno LLC. The equipment supply was realized jointly with Israeli company Sunelectra. The implementation of solar power plant in the southern part of Vinnitsa region is divided into several stages. The first stage 250 kW power was constructed and put into operation in September 2011; the second stage 321.5 kW power installed in October; the last part has to be put into operation during 2012. Another three PV plants will be built in Vinnitsa region by Rentechno. Current status is engineering. Total capacity of that 2 projects is 2,6 MW. Third PV plant will be started soon. Expected capacity of it is 2 MW. Same  month  the  company  announced  about  the  intention  to  implement  ground  mounted  9  MWp solar  photovoltaic  power  plant  in  Kherson  region.  Current  status  is  engineering.  Company responsibilities are full EPC services. The preparation of technical documentation for the project was started in September, 2011. The project is divided into several stages, first of which will be 1 MW and it is planned to be put into operation till the end of March 2012.  The whole PV plant has to be put into operation till the end 2012. Another  PV  project  of  Rentechno  is  ground  mounted  15  MW  solar  photovoltaic  power  plant  in Odessa  region.  Current  status  is  pre‐feasibility  study.  Company  is  in  charge  for  preparation  of  the design  documentation  and  participation  in  the  construction  and  commissioning  works.  The installation of all PV plants has to be finished during 2012. The company is going to run nearly 11 MW overall  capacity  on  the  several  platforms  in  Skadovsk  and  Genichesk  regions  as  EPC‐contractor. Rentechno has several own solar power plants to be built together with Ukrainian and international investors  by  the  end  of  2012.  The  company  is  currently designing the  portfolio of  land in Crimea, Kherson, Nikolayev and Vinnitsa regions. Organization of solar module manufacturing in Ukraine with annual yield up to 25 MW is currently at the  stage  of  pre‐feasibility  study.  This  production  facility  will  be  built  in  order  to  meet  a  growing demand for solar modules in Ukraine and taking into account the fact that certain provisions of green tariff legislation for PV farms come into force from January 1, 2013, i.e. a requirement for a 30 per cent share of materials and components of local origin in solar modules.     MANAGESS AG www.managess.de  Is  part  of  MANAGESS  Energy  GmbH,  focuses  on  solar  energy  and covers  all  the  relevant  tasks  involved  in  photovoltaic  energy  production.  MANAGESS  Energy’s portfolio  encompasses  the  conceptual  design  and  construction  of  advanced  and  efficient photovoltaic systems as well as the wholesale with relevant components. In  August  2011  MANAGESS  Ukraine  LLC  proposed  to  install  solar  panels  in  one  of  the  buildings  in Zaporizhya at its own expense. German company is interested in the implementation of the project "Sunny  roof"  to  demonstrate  the  technological  possibilities  of  the  German  manufacturers.    The    12 
    • technical conditions for implementation of the project – 600 sq. m of the roof and one sq. m of the roof will bare a load of 12 kilos. “Sunny roof” will produce 36 thousand kW/hour. The total cost of the project is 90 thousand EUR, Managess Energy Group will cover around 55% of the costs.   Additionally,  Managess  Energy  Group  plans  to  start  the  construction  of  solar  power  plant  in Prymorske (Zaporizhya oblast), with the total capacity of 10 MW. The total amount of investmentsis projected at 30‐35 million EUR.    SUNELECTRA www.sunelectra.com.ua   Is  an  Israeli  company  focused  on  solar  energy  production  projects.  It  offers  EPC  services,  capital rising, and distribution services for solar projects. The total installed capacity is more than 14 MW. In 2011, Sunelectra has launched its operations in Ukraine, bringing extensive experience and a Russian speaking team.   SCHNEIDER  ELECTRIC www.schneider‐electric.com/ua  The leader in energy management, with more than 110,000 employees  in  over  100  countries,  a  business  of  almost  20  billion  euros  in  2010,  growing rapidly, changing constantly and facing the challenges of todays  markets, has unique positions to provide the Customer with innovative integrated solutions making energy safer, more reliable, more efficient and more productive. Combining  leading  edge  new  businesses  –  energy,  building  automation  and  security,  installation systems  and  control,  power  monitoring  and  control,  critical  power  and  cooling  services  –  to company’s  historical  strengths  of  power  and  control,  Schneider  Electric  provides  Customers  with comprehensive  unique  answers  for  residential,  building,  energy  and  infrastructure  and  data  and networks markets. Originating from France since 1836, Schneider Electric has set up a subsidiary in Ukraine in 2000. As global specialist in energy management Schneider Electric has focused on energy efficiency and has developed a unique worldwide capability to provide these solutions and transform the way people power & control their environment. Having  massive  experience  of  140  MW  peak  photovoltaic  power  plants  put  into  operation  only  in 2010,  including  electrical  solutions,  full  EPC  services  and  operation  and  maintenance  contracts, Schneider  Electric  has  brought  expertise  into  Ukraine  with  providing  inverter  stations  for  the  full‐scale  photovoltaic  plant  in  Ukraine.  As  a  leader  in  power  conversion  with  Xantrex  equipment, Schneider  Electric  is  investigating  opportunities  to  provide  solutions  for  photovoltaic  facilities  from micro‐power home backup systems up to hundred‐megawatt land PV farms.      13 
    • Solarig www.solarig.com  Is a multinational operator specialized in the generation of electricity  using  the  sun  as  the  source.  Since  it  was  founded  in  2005,  it  has developed and operated numerous large and small projects based on photovoltaic technologies. Its activities  are  focused  on  operating  a  portfolio  of  projects  that  are  both  technologically  and geographically  diversified  with  presence  in  Spain,  Italy,  France,  Belgium  or  China.  Up  to  date  has more  than  60  MW  of  installed  capacity,  has  also  developed  more  than  35  MW  for  third  party investors and a portfolio of more than 500 MW under development in different geographical areas. Solarig’s activities involve the entire photovoltaic value chain, from the production and distribution of  modules,  to  the  promotion  and  construction  of  photovoltaic  solar  parks. Company  also  includes their  operation  and  maintenance,  all  the  way  to  the  production  and  sale  of  energy  necessary  to maintain a high production of the park. Currently  and  with  a  stable  presence  in  the  mature  PV  markets,  the  company  is  starting  the development  of  activities  in  other  European  countries  with  a  portfolio  of  projects  in  development amounting to 300 MW. Due to the positive evolution that Ukraine is playing in the PV industry and thanks  to  the  interesting  and  attractive  policies  that  have  been  adopted  in  the  country  for  foreign investors, the Solarig wants to actively invest in Ukraine.     FUNDING FOR PV PLANTS The  commissioning  of  photovoltaic  facilities  in  Ukraine  is  mainly  funded  by  private  investment.  In addition, there are opportunities to raise international funds. At the end of 2010 a program of the European  Bank  for  Reconstruction  and  Development  called  USELF  (Ukraine  Sustainable  Energy Lending  Facility)  was  launched  in  the  country.  The  program  is  aimed  at  facilitating  the implementation  of  projects  with  the  use  of  renewable  energy  sources  in  Ukraine.  The  program volume  is  EUR  50  million,  which  is  sufficient  to  co‐finance  the  construction  of  stations  with  a  total capacity of 10–15 MW. Although this amount is not enough to have a global impact on the industry, the initiative of EBRD has an important symbolic nature. Small projects can also count on support in the amount of EUR50–350 thousand from the NEFCO (Nordic Environment Finance Corporation). In contrast to the industrial segment, the segment of small and medium‐sized installations in Ukraine develops less actively. The combined stock of such solar stations in the country is estimated at 1100 units with a total capacity of 1.1‐ 1.2 MW. Every year the country puts into operation 50‐100 kW of capacity,  80%  of  them  being  commercial  installations.  Low  level  of  private  and  commercial generation development is explained by the impossibility for individuals to obtain a green tariff, as well as by economical inexpediency of small projects with a  capacity of 30 kW amid low  prices for centrally supplied power.  Moreover, the process of obtaining permits for green tariff is completely identical for investors of commercial and industrial stations.    14 
    • EXPERT OPINIONS While conducting this overview EUEA asked members and some partners to share their views on the prospects of solar market development in Ukraine, comment the key measures that would boost the growth of solar energy market in Ukraine, outline key risks of the sector and share the views on the future of this industry.   Sunelectra Ukraine (www.sunelectra.com.ua) Anatoly Drobachevsky, CEO Our  vision  of  key  steps  to  help  Ukrainian  renewable  market  is  to  follow  the  success  of  similar programs  in  leading  European  countries  (Germany,  Italy  for  example).  From  our  point  of  view  the regulation  have  to  become  more  transparent  and  to  involve  less  bureaucratic  processes.    Foreign investors, who do not know all the local nuances, are looking for simple, understandable and logical steps within the regulatory framework. It is important to understand that the final investment into large renewable projects is done by major financial institutions. Those institutions require clear and transparent  regulatory  environment.  The  faster  the  regulation  become  simpler,  the  sooner companies will be ready to invest in Ukrainian alternative energy market.    Structure of green tariff has to be changed to become similar to feed‐in tariffs common in Western European  countries.  Investment  in  alternative  energy  involves  many  risks  in  the  development, construction  and  commissioning  stage.  The  risks  are  much  higher  when  the  green‐tariff  approved only after completion of the project, like it is happening in Ukraine. The foreign financiers, which we mentioned above are currently in position of standby regarding their investment decisions, until this part of regulation is clarified. NERC should come up with clear action plan for approving green tariff for everybody who are willing to invest into solar energy or other renewable projects. Currently, the investors are "sitting on the fence" and waiting to see if the projects are materializing and receiving the green tariff. Several big projects in Crimea area are not enough to convince investors that the law is applied efficiently for every player. The last and very important is a local content rules. Again, it has to become more transparent with clear timeframe. We all know that the local content launch time has already changed several times. In order to allow successful project and investment planning, the local content component has to be carefully planned and more connected to reality. Only in this case, investors will be willing to commit themselves  to  renewable  energy  market  and  invest  in  projects  and  even  establish  factories  in Ukraine.  ARZINGER (www.arzinger.ua) Wolfram Rehbock, Senior Partner The success of photovoltaic in Ukraine is heavily dependent on the further promotion. Thus Ukraine starts to compete with other states for investment. Here, the feed‐in tariff plays a crucial (but not the single) role. Whether the promotion of PV technology in these latitudes is generally appropriate or whether it is just a waste of economic resources should not be discussed at this point.    15 
    • Furthermore, the investor must be able to rely on the tariff rate, the duration of the payments and the  paying  capacity.  Not  least,  it  needs  a  guaranteed  and  privileged  access  not  just  on  paper. Therefore, Ukraine must first put all its efforts into the expansion and renovation of grids. This  will  be  possible  only  through  commercially  reasonable  grid  usage  fees.  In  this  respect,  the regulatory NERC is also required. Only then a framework will be there for an investment, which will pay off many years later. Unfavorable  in  this  context  is  the  local  content,  too.  The  very  uncertainty  as  to  whether  one  can achieve  it  in  Ukraine,  what  disputes  could  arise  over  it  and  whether  the  quality  of  locally manufactured  components  will  match  the  usual  quality  (which  is  essential  for  the  operating performance) could keep some investors in their risk assessment away from Ukraine. Currently,  the  legislation  grants  priority  to  ground‐mounted  systems  and  large  PV  systems  in  the building sector (over 100 KW) by means of the “green tariff”.  At that, it is the small PV systems on buildings that can contribute to the widest possible spread of PV installations.  Since  the  spending  is  much  higher  here,  investments  usually  make  sense  only  if  the yield  per  kW/h  is  above  that  of  ground‐mounted  systems.  Countries  like  Germany  have  already completed their shift away from open space facilities to counter the problem of acreage competition (“Bread  or  energy!?”).  Open  space  facilities  are  there  only  on  conversion  sites  (former  open‐cast mines, military training ground etc.). Such use should also be given priority in Ukraine; in this way, the lengthy reclassifications could be avoided, too. Moreover,  extending  the  support  system  to  solar  heating  is  worth  considering.  The  production  of thermal energy for building management may have a more beneficial impact on the Ukrainian energy industry than the production of electricity, which is anyway available in excess. Solar thermal systems can replace part of the heat and substitute gas imports.   REC Group (www.recgroup.com) Mrs. Silke Kriebel REC is a leading vertically integrated player in the solar energy industry. Ranked among the worlds largest producers of polysilicon and wafers for solar applications and a rapidly growing manufacturer of  solar  cells  and  modules,  REC  also  engages  in  project  development  activities  in  selected  PV segments. Founded in Norway in 1996, REC is an international solar company, employing more than 3,900 people worldwide with revenues close to NOK 14 billion in 2010.  REC is not active in the Ukrainian market so far, but we see a large potential for PV projects based on:   One of the most energy‐intensive economies in the industrialized world   Good natural conditions (solar radiation) & space for PV systems,   Feed‐in‐tariff  system  (“Green  tariff”)  is  very  generous  and  guaranteed  by  the  state  for  20  years   Legal framework is sufficiently developed   Increasing popularity of alternative energy sources due to rising prices for natural gas   Potential of approx. 40MW in 2012     16 
    •  SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC UKRAINE (www.schneider‐electric.com)  Andriy Prischenko, Projects & Services Director Feed‐in  tariff  for  renewable  power  sources  is  a  must  for  further  development  of  this  market  in Ukraine. Current government “green tariff” policy has enabled acceptable return on investment time which resulted in massive boost of land PV facilities market and brought appropriate equipment and expertise  to  Ukraine.  Still  there  is  lots  of  room  to  grow  in  this  field,  provided  the  government  will maintain high feed‐in tariff to make it interesting for investors. However, government‐imposed local content share (of equipment manufactured in Ukraine) for such projects limits growth of this market segment, so that further increasing of this share could collapse the market due to the fact that power conversion technology is not going to be of Ukrainian origin in one or two years. Today  we  face  growing  interest  of  enterprise  site  owners  and  commercial  building  investors  to implement  roof  PV  facilities.  Such  applications  can  generate  enough  power  to  make  selling  energy interesting along with providing a backup power for the site itself. High feed‐in tariff is still important here,  as  much  as  a  simple  procedure  to  obtain  it,  which  currently  is  not  the  case.  Should  the government  simplify  such  procedure  for  small  power  projects,  we  can  expect  much  more photovoltaic modules on the roofs of commercial centers and parking lots. Feasibility of home PV applications in Ukraine is still questionable. With obviously no point in selling energy to utilities, private owners aim mainly to create a backup power source in detached locations and/or to decrease their energy bill. Due to comparatively low price for electrical energy in Ukraine, the latter stays quite improbable, unless appropriate governmental incentive policy would be put in place to help lifting this market segment from zero.  Rentechno (www.rentechno.com)  Dmytro Lukomskiy, Managing Partner   Among the comparative advantages of Ukrainian PV market are the highest “green” tariff in Europe allowing for high IRR and fast payback period and very low saturation in terms of PV power capacity installed. We identify the following key success factors for Ukrainian solar energy market:  (1) Company’s experience in land allocation, solar power plants design and installation processes. (2)  Central  authorities  generate  great  attention  to  the  sector  in  terms  of  creating  development stimuli and investment attractiveness. Local authorities are hungry for new investments inflow and guarantee all the support. (3)  15  months  of  “green  corridor”  until  30%  share  of  local  materials  and  components  in  the  solar modules  installed  requirement  is  introduced;  and  27  months  until  first  reduction  of  the  “green” tariff.    17 
    • There are several options to enhance the solar energy market in Ukraine: 1) To cancel the limitations regarding the share of materials and components of Ukrainian origin in  solar  modules  which  are  used  in  PV  projects.  It  seems  that  another  limitation  on  the  share  of  materials,  components,  works  and  services  of  the  Ukrainian  origin  is  quite  acceptable  and  sufficient for encouragement of local manufacturers and service companies. This measure might  boost the development of new PV power plants. OR   To establish the precise procedure for identification of the components and materials share with  Ukrainian origin in solar modules, used in solar power plants provided with FIT. 2) To  simplify  the  procedure  of  green  tariff  obtaining  for  small  projects  and  private  owners.  The  current  situation leads  to  the potential  feasibility, but financially  inappropriate for  small  PV  projects.  The  first  step  is  to  enable individuals to  easily and  quickly  obtain  a  license  from the  producer of  electricity  and to  simplify the  procedure  for concluding  agreements  with owners  of  the electricity distribution networks. 3) To establish the precise procedure for incurred expenses for upgrading of electrical grids during  development  and  connection  of  the  solar  power  plant  to  the  grid  reimbursement  by  the  Government to the legal entity. 4) To  include  solar  power  plants  in  the  list  of  objects  which  construction  design  does  not  require  obtaining city‐planning conditions and limitations. It will simplify the land permits procedure.   Solarig Holding S.L. (www.solarig.com)         Tania Zurita, Business Development   Although our limited knowledge  of the Ukranian energy market, one of the first difficulties  we have found has been the strong bureaucracy that slows the obtaining of the constructions permits and the license for the connection to the grid, delaying the starting dates of the works in the PV parks  and therefore the growth of the renewable energy production. That is why, the first key measure should be accelerate the administration of permits and licenses through pre‐registration systems.  The  second  key  measure  should  be  supporting  local  PV  industries  so  they  can  be  cost‐competitive with foreign PV components, especially as the Ukrainian government requires Ukrainian equipment to be used in the PV projects located in the national territory. The support of Ukrainian PV industries will lead in new business opportunities and a more competitive market.    The  last  and  third  key  measure  we  would  like  to  propose  is  the  aim  of  the  government  to  the development  of  the  PV  plants.  This  measure  can  be  done  by  providing  to  independent  energy producers  public  spaces,  roofs  or  land,  in  areas  of  high  energetic  demand  to  install  photovoltaic energy plants and minimize the transportation cost.      18 
    • Appendix I             19 
    • Appendix II                20