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Art & Science ICCFA
 

Art & Science ICCFA

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Lecture given as guest professor at ICCFA University 2007, on the Art and Science of interviewing and selecting employees.

Lecture given as guest professor at ICCFA University 2007, on the Art and Science of interviewing and selecting employees.

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  • Introduction (By Presenter) Welcome to the 2007 ICCFA University. How is everybody doing today? Before we begin this afternoon's session, I would like to congratulate you all for taking the steps necessary to build upon your expertise in our industry. This really shows your dedication to your firms, and your families. My name is Mike Hays, and I hope the next 90 minutes will educate you on how to deal with one of the biggest challenges facing the operations of you firms and cemeteries - Recruiting and Hiring quality individuals. I have been with ICCFA for _____ years. My career in the funeral industry has been hard work but very exciting and extremely rewarding. Co-presenting with me today is Jason Widing. Co-Presenter introduction (By Co-Presenter) Brief outline of the presentation (Lots of information, implement a process approach to successful recruiting, walk away with the basic elements and/or methods to build future growth with regards to recruiting)
  • When you think of Art and Science, what are some words, phrases, or thoughts that come to your mind? Let me talk about a couple of more famous people in Science and Art. A little about Einstein’s creativity… In 1905 Einstein presented his Theory of Relativity, and is considered to be one of the most significant scientific advances of our time. Although the concept of relativity was not introduced by Einstein, his major contribution was that his theory could explain the phenomena of light bending around the sun, as well as could predict black holes. Later that same year, Einstein also derived the famous equation, E=mc2 , which reveals the equivalence of mass and energy. In 1921, Albert Einstein then went on to win the Nobel Prize. Can anyone tell me the name of this painting and who the artist is? There are only a handful of artist in art history that have the name recognition as Vincent Van Gogh. Van Gogh grew up the son of a Dutch Protestant Minister and was a student of theology, but dabbled, if you will, in painting and drawing. It was while he was during his evangelical ministries in Belgium in 1885 that he is acknowledged for painting one of his early masterpieces. In 1886, Van Gogh launched himself into the study of Impressionist and Japanese prints, sometimes going through a canvas per day. After two years, he emerged with a highly original palette that showed his love of light and color. His paintings increasingly showed a lack of brushwork as he, in his haste to capture it, spread the color he saw in life thickly in the canvas with his palette knife – and even straight from the tube. It was during this period of his life that he is quoted as saying, “I want to get to the point where people say of my work; that man feels deeply.” Vincent Van Gogh's work pioneered the Expressionistic style of painting. You may be asking yourself, “How do Albert Einstein or Vincent Van Gogh have any thing to do with the cemetery or funeral industry, let alone recruiting and interviewing?” On the surface, they don’t! However, if we look deeper as to the creative process that all scientists and all artist go through to produce a masterpiece or a Nobel Prize winning theory, I argue they are closely interconnected.
  • However, more often then not, this detailed, creative approach to Art and Science is not the same approach we take with regards to hiring our employees or representatives. Instead, we take a less creative approach which I am sure all of use have experienced either on the hiring or firing side of recruiting…… "The Revolving-Door Approach" By a show of hands, how many of us have felt like all we are doing in our recruiting and interviewing is having candidates walk in and out of our organizations….hiring one week, then letting go the next; only to start it all over again - hoping to find the "Right Fit" for our locations? Let me assure you…You're not alone.
  • There is a reported 50 Million active online resumes in circulation within the U.S. at any one time. However, these same reports say that: ½ Million people falsely claim to have a college degree. 68.7% fabricate reasons for leaving prior jobs. 45.2% enhance previous job responsibilities. Combine these statistics with the reality that most previous employers give little information about the candidate other than confirming dates of employment and salaries during reference checks.
  • When inviting a candidate to an interview, Competence is assumed, because you don't waste time talking to people don't meet the minimum qualification. These qualifications are typically found in resumes and phone screening. However, from the previous slide, we know how reliable resumes and screening can be. Ultimately, an employee is hired because of their skills and later fired because of their attitude and behaviors….that's Compatibility, and that's hard to surface; but don't worry we're going to talk later about how to do that. Probably one of the biggest causes for "Revolving-Door Recruiting" is "Trusting Your Gut" Predictability studies have consistently shown the reliability of hiring decisions made from "gut instinct" is just slightly better than flipping a coin. Unless you have been professionally trained, AND have conducted hundreds of interviews, I strongly suggest not hiring with your gut feel. What are some other reasons for "Revolving-Door Recruiting" How much do you think the wrong hire COSTS?
  • Reports from 2004 published that a cost-per-hire was $4,262, an increase of over $260 from the previous year, creating a 6% increase in costs. If increasing trends continue, it is projected that by 2010, just three years away, the cost-per-hire if the wrong individual will be $6,046. I don't know about you, but I don't have 6,000 dollars to give away. The U.S. Department of Labor places the cost at one-third or more of a new employee's annual salary for the hourly worker, and many times that amount for management, sales, and executive employees. However, what is the REAL COST of "Revolving-Door Recruiting"?
  • So, the question I'm sure every one is asking, now that we have created this bleak situation is, "How do we solve our "Revolving-Door Recruiting"? Step 1. Adopt the guiding philosophy of “Performance Excellence” "Performance Excellence" essentially means that everyone from the groundskeeper of the cemetery, to the at-need counselor, to the owner is responsible for doing whatever it takes to deliver the highest level of service. It's instilling a commitment to ensure every interaction with a family is met with both a professional and family-focused mind-set. Step 2. Evaluate and identify key improvement opportunities within recruiting Importantly, what you are wanting to identify are the key improvement opportunities where you can create an effective and efficient recruiting process. Ask yourself…. Where are the areas we are wasting time? Where are the areas that are costing us the most? How long is it taking us to locate a quality individual? How long are individuals staying with our location? Step 3. Make the Change - Create the Process After identifying improvement opportunities, it's time to step up to the challenge of making the change to improving the recruiting process. The two area where we will focus on making improvements, today, will be: The Pre-Hire and Application Process and the Interviewing and Hiring Process
  • There are 5 basic components within the Pre-Hire and Application Process. They are: 1- Defining the Organization and Position Objectives 2 - Sourcing Potential Candidate 3 - Prescreening and Information Gathering 4 - Building your Recruiting Database And…5 - Do We have a Match? We're going to discuss the first three major components in a little more detail, but taking you back to the theme of our session today, the Pre-Hire and Application Process is where you learn " The Science of Selection" This is where you become the Einstein's of your organization.
  • First and foremost…WHO ARE YOU? When trying to answer that question it's vital that you try to answer from both an internal and external view. Let me give you some examples of how to look at you and your organization. How do you describe your company’s “culture?” What role does your firm play in your community? What role does your company play in the larger corporate structure (if applicable)? Most importantly...Your hiring practices must be consistent with your Mission, Vision, and Management Philosophy. Now that you have looked at yourself and your organization, your next focus should be centered on the position and the type of candidate you want to add to your team.
  • You know who you are…WHERE IS YOUR TARGET? Have you analyzed your capacity relative to your production goal? – Do you really know how many people you need? Have you established the qualifications for the position? – Are the qualifications relevant? – Is there a job description? A current job description? As an example of what we are talking about, here is a sample job description outline with an example Candidate Success Profile. These can be created very easily with a little time and thought into what you are trying to target for a position. (Pass out sample Job Description and CSP handouts) Now we know what were looking for, but where do we find them?
  • Before we get into where the candidates are, let me share with you what most organizations are up against when recruiting. The U.S. Department of Labor demographic trends indicate that overall supply of skilled talent is declining, while the demand is increasing. What does that mean?...Basic supply and demand…not enough people to choose from; making it even more critical that a well defined organization and position be in place to attract quality candidates to the job. Recruiting expert, Lou Adler, said that companies face up to a 90% yield loss in the recruiting process when good candidates opt out of the hiring process, or when they don't see an ad. In a survey conducted in September 2006, 75% of 300 technical companies recently said they had lost qualified candidates in the last quarter because the recruiting process moved too slowly. So where are companies finding candidates?
  • A non-profit association of employers, in Washington D.C., surveyed 73 leading employers back in February 2006. Their purpose was to uncover where employers were sourcing their New Hires, and understand the value placed on the type of sourcing they utilized. Here are their findings: 1.Employment Web Site – 21% 2.Referrals – 19% 3.General Job Boards (Monster.com, CareerBuilders.com)– 15% 4.Search Firms – 10% 5.Campus Recruiting – 8% 6.“Other” – 6% 7.Niche Job Boards (Funeralstaff.com)– 6% 8.Social Network Web Sites (ICCFA.org)– 5% What is not surprising is that over 50% of New Hires were sourced from the internet. By a show of hands, How many here are using the internet at one of your chief sourcing tools for recruiting? Now that you’re using the internet for recruiting, would you like to know which of these eight recruiting sources are the most cost effective and yield the best candidates? This same survey uncovered source success. Here they are in order : Referrals Social Networking Websites Employment Websites Why do you think these recruiting sources have the greatest value? Mainly because the come from a direct relationship, but even more so…they’re mostly free! So, we've defined WHO WE ARE. We've defined WHAT WE WANT. We've sourced them. How do we know if they're the right candidate?
  • Remember some of the statistic I gave you about the causes of "Revolving-Door Recruiting"? Well...if there is any "One Thing" I hope you take away from this class today, it is that in all of your recruiting process you apply this principle… " Trust. But verify" Prescreen and Information gathering is not a time for you to check how you feel about the information being given to you, but rather a process of collecting and verifying the truth. There are three stages to the Prescreen and Information Gathering – they are the: Preliminary Stage Competency Stage Compatibility Stage We’re going to talk a little about each of these three stages.

Art & Science ICCFA Art & Science ICCFA Presentation Transcript

  • The Art of the Interview and The Science of Selection A Process Approach to Recruiting Quality Individuals Jason Widing Business Development Manager Lincoln Heritage Funeral Planning
  • The Processes of Art and Science— How are they Measured?
  • The most common Recruiting Process – A Miserable Measure
  • What is the Cause of “Revolving-Door Recruiting”?
    • 50 Million active online resumes in circulation within U.S.
    • ½ Million people falsely claim to have a college degree
    • 68.7% fabricate reasons for leaving prior jobs
    • 45.2% enhance previous job responsibilities
    • Source: Are You Using Best Practices in Hiring , www.hiresmart.com
    • Source: The Kern/Ferry International Executive Recruiter Index (Part IV)
  • Additional Causes of “Revolving-Door Recruiting”?
    • Harder to pinpoint compatibility than competence
    • The 21st Century has Created the “Professional” Candidate
    • “Trusting your gut”
  • What is the Cost of “Revolving-Door Recruiting”?
    • 2004 cost-per-hire = $4,262. An increase of $260 from 2003 (a 6% increase)
    • 6% Trend = Projected $6,046 Cost by 2010
    • U.S. DOL reported cost at 1/3 or more of annual salary for hourly
    • Source: Recruiting Metrics and Performance Benchmark Report, July 2004.
  • What is the Real Cost of “Revolving-Door Recruiting”?
    • Lost Opportunity
    • Lost Productivity
    • Training Costs
    • Additional Recruiting Costs
    • Severance Packages
    • Litigation
    • Others?
  • How do you break away from “Revolving-Door Recruiting”?
    • Step 1. Adopt the guiding philosophy of “Performance Excellence”
    • Step 2. Evaluate and identify key improvement opportunities within recruiting
    • Step 3. Make the Change – Create the Process
          • Pre-Hire and Application Process
          • Interviewing and Hiring Process
  • Creating the Selection Process – Opportunities for Improvements Pre-Hire and Application Processes Defining the Organization and Position Objectives Sourcing Potential Candidate Prescreening and Information Gathering Building your Recruiting Database Do We have a Match? The Science of Selection
  • Defining the Organization and Position Objectives
    • Who are you?
    • How do you describe your company’s “culture?”
    • What role does your firm play in your community?
    • What role does your company play in the larger corporate structure (if applicable)?
    Your hiring practices must be consistent with your Mission, Vision, and Management Philosophy.
  • Defining the Organization and Position Objectives (cont)
    • Where is your target?
    • Have you analyzed your capacity relative to your production goal?
      • Do you really know how many people you need?
    • Have you established the qualifications for the position?
      • Are the qualifications relevant?
      • Is there a job description? A current job description?
  • Sourcing Potential Candidates
    • Companies face up to a 90% yield loss in the recruiting process when good candidates opt out of the hiring process.
    • 75% of 300 companies recently said they had lost qualified candidates in the last quarter because the recruiting process moved too slowly.
    • Source: Growing Your Company, 3 Strategic Recruiting Practices
  • Sourcing Potential Candidates (cont)
    • Employment Web Site – 21%
    • Referrals – 19%
    • General Job Boards – 15%
    • Search Firms – 10%
    • Campus Recruiting – 8%
    • “ Other” – 6%
    • Niche Job Boards – 6%
    • Social Network Web Sites – 5%
    • Over 50% of New Hires were sourced from the internet
    • Source: 2006 Recruiting Trends Survey Summary, Direct Employers
  • Prescreen and Information Gathering
    • “ Trust. But verify”
    • - Anonymous
  • Three Stages of Prescreening and Information Gathering Impact on Performance Stages of Prescreening and Information Gathering (APPEAR TO…) (CAN DO…) (WILL DO…) PRELIMINARY Appearance Manner Expressiveness Interests Presence COMPETENCY Knowledge Acquired Skills Training Experience Education Credentials COMPATABILITY Attitudes and Beliefs Self Motivation Stability and Persistence Maturity and Judgment Aptitude/Temperament Behavior Patterns
  • Creating the Interviewing Process – Opportunities for Improvements Interviewing & Hiring Processes Candidate Invited for Interview Conditional Offer of Employment Drug & Alcohol, Reference Screening (Background Checks) Hired The Art of the Interview
  • Interview Preparation
    • Have you prepared and practiced your interview questions?
      • Are you consistent and do you have a “questioning strategy?” Your strategy depends on who you are and your goal.
    • Have you prepared the environment?
      • NO INTERRUPTIONS. Does your choice of time and place allow you and the prospect to “relax and focus?”
    • Have you studied all resumes?
      • You have control. Can you keep it?
  • Interview Preparation (cont)
    • Do you know all compliance requirements?
      • Do’s and Don’ts
      • Do you have enough money to burn a wet mule?
  • What is an Interview? Judgement Day
  • Conducting the Interview
    • Turn your ears on
      • Good interviewers employ the 80/20 rule; listening 80% of the time and speaking 20% of the time or less
    • Rephrase questions
      • Don’t let the superficial slide
    • Get comfortable with silence
      • Common courtesy demands it
  • Conducting the Interview (cont)
    • Follow up with and interject additional probing questions with “Professional Persistence”
      • Get the candidate to expand his/her answer
    • Take copious notes.
      • Not on the resume.
      • Your notes are a legal document.
    • Panning for Gold
      • Behaviors/Habits
      • Skills vs. Disciplines/Work Ethic
  • Behavioral Interview Questions … … ask for specific examples of how the candidate has demonstrated a job-related behavior in the past . Interviewing Candidates
      • Tell me about some of the obstacles that have threatened the success of your team. What steps have you taken to overcome those obstacles?
      • As a manager, what’s the most frustrating part of your current job?
      • Tell me about a time you had to use a persuasive approach to get one of your staff back on track?
      • Tell me about a decision you made within the last year that was not particularly well liked.
    Sample Behavioral Interviewing Questions
  • “ Flip the switch”… But, don’t oversell. Conducting the Interview (cont)
  • Follow Up
    • What “protection” or “security measures” do you insist upon?
      • Do you check references? Do you REQUIRE a list of references?
      • Do you get background checks?
    • What selection criteria, tools, and/or processes do you employ?
      • Objectivity is KEY
    • Is a second interview in order?
      • Think investment, capacity, and TEAM
  • Follow Up (cont)
    • How do you prepare the “offer?”
      • Leave nothing to guesswork.
    • Do you send “regrets” to everyone interviewed?
    • What does your “Welcome Wagon” look like?
  • A Scientific and Artistic Recruiting Process Pre-Hire and Application Processes Defining the Organization and Position Objectives Sourcing Potential Candidate Prescreening and Information Gathering Building your Recruiting Database Interviewing & Hiring Processes Do We have a Match? Candidate Invited for Interview Conditional Offer of Employment Drug & Alcohol Reference Screening (Background Checks) Hired
    • You Can Teach a Turkey to Climb a Tree, But It’s Easier to Hire a Squirrel.
    • Spenser & Spenser (1993)
    What Do You Want to Hire? -VS-