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Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
Unit 3
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Unit 3

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  • 1. UNIT 3 Constructing Arguments Please Get a Copy of the DA
  • 2. CLAIMS Any belief the source wishes the receiver to accept.
  • 3. It is the Focal Point of Persuasion -- The point we want to get across
  • 4. TYPES of CLAIMS
  • 5. Designative They are concerned with fact – “Is it?” They get at a belief or what something is or is not.
  • 6. Did the person driving exceed the posted speed limit? Did the bookstore make money during the last quarter?
  • 7. Definitive They answer the question “what is it” or “what do we call it?” They get at what something should be called.
  • 8. Is a 6-win and 5-loss football season a winning season? Is the taking of a life by Mr. Smith “first degree murder?”
  • 9. Evaluative They are concerned with “what is its quality?” It’s judgment based – is something good or bad
  • 10. Cheating on an exam is an evil thing. All politicians are treacherous slime.
  • 11. Advocative They are concerned with policy – “What should be done about that?” They advocate a course of action that should be taken.
  • 12. How should someone who commits first-degree murder be dealt? Should the US government meddle in other country’s affairs?
  • 13. ACTIVITY
  • 14. SUPPORT/DATA This is any belief held by a receiver which may be used to support the claim. Support is useless if the receiver does not believe it.
  • 15. Types of Support
  • 16. Receiver Belief Something the receiver already believes IDEAL DATA
  • 17. Source Credibility If the receiver sees the sources as being credible, then the source can make claims that function as assertions by a credible source.
  • 18. Evidence from others Opinions and facts attest to by others Depends on source’s credibility and on the credibility of the source of the evidence. Easiest for Receiver to Reject
  • 19. REASONING Receiver’s judgment of the extent to which the claim is supported by the types of support
  • 20. SUPPORT CLAIM REASON
  • 21. Audience Analysis
  • 22. Where Am I From? 61% Somewhere in West Virginia -- Morgantown the most Popular answer What do I drive? 8.7 % -- Honda or Toyota
  • 23. My Age? Average = 27.185 What is my political affiliation? 53% Republican 33.84 % Democrat
  • 24. My Favorite Movie? 6.9% Forest Gump 3.84% Matrix My Past Jobs? 23.84% Worked at McDonalds 6.92% Waiter or Pizza Shop Delivery
  • 25. My favorite Drink? 30.769% Pepsi 36.15% Coke My Religious Affiliation? 39.23% Catholic 18.46% Christian - Protestant
  • 26. RESERVATIONS These are weaknesses in or exceptions to our argument. – the source knows that the claim might not hold true under all circumstances.
  • 27. USING ARGUMENTS
  • 28. Main Argument Start with a main claim or point you want to make. Supporting Arguments From that initial argument, others should follow which support it.
  • 29. Have Enough Arguments Have enough arguments to overcome reservations. If you can’t overcome reservations – then the argument is too weak.

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